Clinical evaluations of plaque removal efficacy: An advanced rotating-oscillating power toothbrush versus a sonic toothbrush

Procter & Gamble Company Mason, OH, USA.
The Journal of clinical dentistry 01/2007; 18(4):106-11.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the safety and plaque removal efficacy of an advanced rotating-oscillating power toothbrush relative to a sonic toothbrush with either a standard or compact brush head.
Two studies used a randomized, examiner-blind, two-treatment, crossover design. In Study 1, subjects were instructed to use their first randomly assigned toothbrush for five to seven days and then, after abstaining from all oral hygiene for 24 hours, were assessed with the Rustogi, et al. Modified Navy Plaque Index. They then brushed for two minutes and post-brushing plaque scores were recorded. Subjects were assigned to the alternate toothbrush and the procedures were repeated. In Study 2, subjects alternated using both brushes for approximately 10 days, then had four study visits three to four days apart (some variability based on patient scheduling). In Study 1, Oral-B Triumph with a FlossAction brush head and Sonicare Elite 7300 with a full-size, standard head were compared in a two-treatment, two-period crossover study. Study 2 compared Oral-B Triumph with a FlossAction brush head and Sonicare Elite 7300 with a compact head in a two-treatment, four-period crossover study.
Fifty subjects completed Study 1 and 48 completed Study 2. All brushes were found to be safe and significantly reduced plaque after a single brushing. In Study 1, Oral-B Triumph was statistically significantly (p < 0.001) more effective in plaque removal than Sonicare Elite 7300 with the full-size brush head: whole mouth = 24% better, marginal = 31% better, approximal = 21% better. In Study 2, Oral-B Triumph was statistically significantly (p < 0.001) more effective than Sonicare Elite 7300 with the compact brush head: whole mouth = 12.2% better, marginal = 14.6% better, approximal = 12% better.
Oral-B Triumph with its rotation-oscillation action was significantly more effective in single-use plaque removal than Sonicare Elite 7300 with its side-to-side sonic action when fitted with either a standard or a compact brush head.

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