Migration of BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl-ether) and BFDGE (bisphenol F diglycidyl-ether) in canned seafood

ArticleinFood and Chemical Toxicology 46(5):1674-80 · June 2008with38 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.90 · DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2008.01.006 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Migration of potentially toxic materials used for the lining of commercial can goods remains an important issue, especially with respect to certain types of processed foods. Seafood is one type where more information is needed with respect to other ingredients used for adding value to fishery products. Most cans are internally coated with starters of resins such as bisphenol A diglycidyl-ether (BADGE) and bisphenol F diglycidyl-ether (BFDGE), both considered as toxic compounds. Several seafood products, sardines, tuna fish, mackerel, mussels, cod and mackerel eggs, were manufactured in different conditions changing covering sauce, time and temperature of storage and heat-treated for sterilization in cans. Migration kinetics of BADGE and BFDGE from varnish into canned products were evaluated by HPLC in 70 samples after 6, 12 or 18 months of storage. Results showed that there is no migration of BADGE in tuna fish, sardines, mussels or cod. However, migration of BFDGE occurs in all species, in a storage time-dependent way and content of fat, although migration of these compounds is not affected by sterilization conditions. All samples analyzed presented values lower than 9 mg BADGE/kg net product without exceeding European limits. However, concerning BFDGE migration, European legislation does not allow the use and/or the presence of BFDGE. Main migration takes place in mackerel reaching the highest values, 0.74 mg BFDGE/kg and 0.34 mg BADGE/kg net product, in red pepper sauce.