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Breen, M and Modiano, JF. Evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes in hematological malignancies of dogs and humans-man and his best friend share more than companionship. Chromosome Res 16: 145-154

Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 27606, USA.
Chromosome Research (Impact Factor: 2.48). 02/2008; 16(1):145-54. DOI: 10.1007/s10577-007-1212-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiological similarities shared by many forms of human and canine disease, combined with the sophisticated genomic resources now available for the dog, have placed 'man's best friend' in a position of high visibility as a model system for a variety of biomedical concerns, including cancer. The importance of nonrandom cytogenetic abnormalities in human leukemia and lymphoma was recognized over 40 years ago, but the mechanisms of genome reorganization remain incompletely understood. The development of molecular cytogenetics, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology, has played a significant role in our understanding of cancer biology by providing a means for 'interrogating' tumor cells for a variety of gross genetic changes in the form of either numerical or structural chromosome aberrations. Here, we have identified cytogenetic abnormalities in naturally occurring canine hematopoietic tumors that are evolutionarily conserved compared with those that are considered characteristic of the corresponding human condition. These data suggest that humans and dogs share an ancestrally retained pathogenetic basis for cancer and that cytogenetic evaluation of canine tumors may provide greater insight into the biology of tumorigenesis.

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    • "In veterinary field the cancer therapy normally ends up in euthanasia (Breen and Modiano, 2008). However, since American college of veterinary internal medicine/oncology certified radiation oncology as a separate discipline two decades ago, there has been an increased awareness about the role of veterinary oncology in understanding the cancer further besides changing the therapeutic perspective in animal cancer (Mack, 2006; Khanna et al., 2006). "
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    • "In veterinary field the cancer therapy normally ends up in euthanasia (Breen and Modiano, 2008). However, since American college of veterinary internal medicine/oncology certified radiation oncology as a separate discipline two decades ago, there has been an increased awareness about the role of veterinary oncology in understanding the cancer further besides changing the therapeutic perspective in animal cancer (Mack, 2006; Khanna et al., 2006). "
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