Article

Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Electronic Health Records on Work and Patient Outcomes

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
CIN Computers Informatics Nursing (Impact Factor: 0.72). 03/2008; 26(2):69-77. DOI: 10.1097/01.NCN.0000304775.40531.67
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study addresses community hospital nurses' use of electronic health records and views of the impact of such records on job performance and patient outcomes. Questionnaire, interview, and observation data from 46 nurses in medical-surgical and intensive care units at two community hospitals were analyzed. Nurses preferred electronic health records to paper charts and were comfortable with technology. They reported use of electronic health records enhanced nursing work through increased information access, improved organization and efficiency, and helpful alert screens. They thought use of the records hindered nursing work through impaired critical thinking, decreased interdisciplinary communication, and a high demand on work time (73% reported spending at least half their shift using the records). They thought use of electronic health records enabled them to provide safer care but decreased the quality of care. Administrative implications include involving bedside nurses in system choice, streamlining processes, developing guidelines for consistent documentation quality and location, increasing system speed, choosing hardware that encourages bedside use, and improving system information technology support.

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    • "Nurses are rarely considered " technical " experts, and yet they regularly fabricate custom solutions from available materials to meet the wide range of challenges they experience while delivering clinical care (Caldwell et al., 2011). Nurses also rely on computers heavily to complete many aspects of their job, with some reporting up to half their work shift being spent on a computer (Kossman and Scheidenhelm, 2008) We studied a test group of practicing nurses (n=5) and a control group of practicing engineers with previous experience with CAD systems (n=5). The nurses had to be licensed and practicing for at least five years prior to the study. "
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    ABSTRACT: This pilot study examines CAD software learning differences between a group of non-technical innovators (clinical nurses) and traditional CAD users (design engineers). This research was motivated by the rapid growth of digital fabrication methods and the proliferation of low cost, semi-professional CAD software, both of which have reduced prototyping barriers for innovators outside of professional design. The study's methodology consisted of (i) a pre-test survey to assess each subject's degree of computer usage and confidence in 3D modeling, (ii) the completion of a CAD tutorial on a laptop, and (iii) an interview to record each participant's impressions of the design experience. Based on a mixed-methods analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, the study showed that the nursing cohort had both the strong motivation and technical ability to learn CAD software. However, their profession enforces a low tolerance for ambiguity or time inefficiency, making the traditional engineering methods of " explore and learn " inappropriate. The output of this study will be used to assemble an extensive experimental curriculum for nurse innovators interested in medical device design.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jul 2015
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    • "Nurses are rarely considered " technical " experts, and yet they regularly fabricate custom solutions from available materials to meet the wide range of challenges they experience while delivering clinical care (Caldwell et al., 2011). Nurses also rely on computers heavily to complete many aspects of their job, with some reporting up to half their work shift being spent on a computer (Kossman and Scheidenhelm, 2008) We studied a test group of practicing nurses (n=5) and a control group of practicing engineers with previous experience with CAD systems (n=5). The nurses had to be licensed and practicing for at least five years prior to the study. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This pilot study examines CAD software learning differences between a group of non-technical innovators (clinical nurses) and traditional CAD users (design engineers). This research was motivated by the rapid growth of digital fabrication methods and the proliferation of low cost, semi-professional CAD software, both of which have reduced prototyping barriers for innovators outside of professional design. The study's methodology consisted of (i) a pre-test survey to assess each subject's degree of computer usage and confidence in 3D modeling, (ii) the completion of a CAD tutorial on a laptop, and (iii) an interview to record each participant's impressions of the design experience. Based on a mixed-methods analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, the study showed that the nursing cohort had both the strong motivation and technical ability to learn CAD software. However, their profession enforces a low tolerance for ambiguity or time inefficiency, making the traditional engineering methods of " explore and learn " inappropriate. The output of this study will be used to assemble an extensive experimental curriculum for nurse innovators interested in medical device design.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jul 2015
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    • "Both qualitative and quantitative work has been performed to examine the effect of the adoption of EMRs on the nursing profession. Kossman and Scheidenhelm found that 73% of nurses studied self-reported spending over half of each shift with the EMR and expressed concerns about hardware issues, decreased time with patients, and miscommunication [3]. Poissant et al. performed a systematic review of work sampling and time-motion studies performed on nurses and physicians when comparing paperbased systems and newly implemented EMR systems [4]. "
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