A possible role of histone-like DNA-binding protein of Streptococcus intermedius in the pathogenesis of bile duct damage in primary biliary cirrhosis

ArticleinClinical Immunology 127(2):245-51 · June 2008with18 Reads
DOI: 10.1016/j.clim.2008.01.010 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Bacterial infection has become a focus of attention in the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). It was reported that anti-histone autoantibody was detected in PBC, suggesting that bacterial histone-like DNA-binding protein (HLP) may be involved in the pathogenesis of PBC. To identify bacterial species in PBC to confirm this possibility, serum reactivity to bacterial cells was studied by ELISA. The IgM class Streptococcus intermedius titers were significantly higher in PBC than chronic hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus (CH-C) and healthy subjects. Among the streptococci, S. intermedius was selected for further study. The antigenic peptide of S. intermedius of HLP was synthesized to examine the serum reactivity to Si-HLP. IgM class anti-Si-HLP peptide titers were significantly higher in PBC. Immunoreactivity to anti-Si-HLP was detected in the cytoplasm of biliary epithelial cells and inflammatory cells in the portal area in PBC patients' livers. Streptococci, especially S. intermedius, might play a key role in the pathogenesis of PBC, possibly involving HLP.
    • "Notwithstanding a substantial shared sequence homology, in a fewer cases a cross reactivity by 2-OADC-specific autoantibodies and/or T cells has been also demonstrated. This is the case for Escherichia coli [100,101,103] , Novosphingobium aromaticivorans [32,104,105] , Salmonella Minnesota [106], Pseudomonas aeruginosa [107], Haemophilus influenzae [103] , Yersinia enterocol- itica [103], Streptococcus intermedius [108] , Lactobacillus delbrueckii [109] , Paracoccus denitrifi- cans [110], Mycoplasma [111,112] , Mycobacterium gordonae [113], Borrelia burgdorferi [114] , Try- panosomes [115], and Ascaridia galli [115] (Table 1). Moreover, microbial antigens or DNA have been found in liver specimens, gallbladder bile, and fecal samples of patients with PBC as for N. aromaticivo- rans [104], Propionibacterium acnes [116] , and Epstein Barr virus [117]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease that manifests a latitudinal gradient in prevalence and incidence. The mechanisms leading to the initiation and perpetuation of PBC remain largely enigmatic, although it is established that a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental stimulation is required. PBC is also characterized by a high concordance rate in monozygotic twins and is considered a model autoimmune disease because of several features common to other conditions and the relatively homogeneous serological and biochemical features. From a diagnostic standpoint, PBC is characterized by the highest specificity of serum autoantibodies directed at mitochondrial proteins. Several risk factors have been suggested to be associated with PBC, including exposure to infectious agents and chemical xenobiotics that will be critically discussed in the present review article.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) would develop when the immune system comes across a microorganism with proteins similar to those in the piruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 (PDC-E2), or a neoantigen resulting from a xenobiotic-modified autoantigen. This would lead to an innate immune response where TLRs would play a pivotal mediating role, which would give rise to a local microenvironment favoring an adaptive immune response. Such response would be particularly strong in individuals with selected genetic characteristics. The genetic characteristics underlying this predisposition remain unknown, but they likely entail small numbers of scarcely-active regulatory T cells. The AE2 anion exchanger, which is deficient in patients with PBC, may reduce the number and activity of regulatory T cells. NK cells are also pivotal in the preparation of an adaptive response, as they release a number of cytokines and chemokines that favor and recruit antigen-presenting cells to activate B and T cells - CD4+ Th1 and CD8+. An activation of the former would increase the production of IgM and anti-mitochondrial IgG and IgA antibodies against PDC-E2. An activation of CD8+ cells, also sensitive to PDC-2 as aberrantly expressed on the surface of BECs and SECs, would result in apoptosis for these epithelial cells, and in small bile-duct destruction. Immune response is likely inadequately suppressed because of the small numbers of scarcely-active regulatory T cells, the latter resulting from low genetic expression and activity of the AE2 transporter.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2009
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) would develop when the immune system comes across a microorganism with proteins similar to those in the piruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 (PDC-E2), or a neoantigen resulting from a xenobiotic-modified autoantigen. This would lead to an innate immune response where TLRs would play a pivotal mediating role, which would give rise to a local microenvironment favoring an adaptive immune response. Such response would be particularly strong in individuals with selected genetic characteristics. The genetic characteristics underlying this predisposition remain unknown, but they likely entail small numbers of scarcely-active regulatory T cells. The AE2 anion exchanger, which is deficient in patients with PBC, may reduce the number and activity of regulatory T cells. NK cells are also pivotal in the preparation of an adaptive response, as they release a number of cytokines and chemokines that favor and recruit antigen-presenting cells to activate B and T cells - CD4+ Th1 and CD8+. An activation of the former would increase the production of IgM and anti-mitochondrial IgG and IgA antibodies against PDC-E2. An activation of CD8+ cells, also sensitive to PDC-2 as aberrantly expressed on the surface of BECs and SECs, would result in apoptosis for these epithelial cells, and in small bile-duct destruction. Immune response is likely inadequately suppressed because of the small numbers of scarcely-active regulatory T cells, the latter resulting from low genetic expression and activity of the AE2 transporter.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2009
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