Article

Dissonance and Healthy Weight Eating Disorder Prevention Programs: Long-Term Effects From a Randomized Efficacy Trial

Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (Impact Factor: 4.85). 05/2008; 76(2):329-40. DOI: 10.1037/0022-006X.76.2.329
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Adolescent girls with body dissatisfaction (N = 481, SD = 1.4) were randomized to a dissonance-based thin-ideal internalization reduction program, healthy weight control program, expressive writing control condition, or assessment-only control condition. Dissonance participants showed significantly greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, negative affect, eating disorder symptoms, and psychosocial impairment and lower risk for eating pathology onset through 2- to 3-year follow-up than did assessment-only controls. Dissonance participants showed greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and psychosocial impairment than did expressive writing controls. Healthy weight participants showed greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, negative affect, eating disorder symptoms, and psychosocial impairment; less increases in weight; and lower risk for eating pathology and obesity onset through 2- to 3-year follow-up than did assessment-only controls. Healthy weight participants showed greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization and weight than did expressive writing controls. Dissonance participants showed a 60% reduction in risk for eating pathology onset, and healthy weight participants showed a 61% reduction in risk for eating pathology onset and a 55% reduction in risk for obesity onset relative to assessment-only controls through 3-year follow-up, implying that the effects are clinically important and enduring.

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    • "Esiste un manuale italiano del progetto corpo (Stice & Presnell, 2011). Gestione Salutare del Peso (Stice et al., 2006). Inizialmente pensato per uno dei gruppi di controllo nella validazione del progetto corpo, questo programma ha prodotto miglioramenti significativi rispetto a un gruppo di controllo che prevedeva esercizi di scrittura espressiva. "

    Full-text · Chapter · Jan 2015
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    • "Thus, results should be generalized to ethnic minority groups with care. Although the Body Project has produced similar effects for Latino, Asian, and European American participants (Rodriguez, Marchand, Ng, & Stice, 2008), the sample This document is copyrighted by the American Psychological Association or one of its allied publishers. This article is intended solely for the personal use of the individual user and is not to be disseminated broadly. "
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    • "To our knowledge, no studies have examined whether or not onset of clinical depression was also changed, although reductions in continuous measures of negative affect have been found. The two studies that demonstrated the above three EDs prevention programs could produce true prevention effects were both selective/indicated studies [40,41], and thus are not reviewed here. Instead, we review public health approaches and campaigns that have targeted shared risk factors for EDs and depression. "
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