Article

Vascular factors and depression

Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Wolfson Research Centre, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 2.87). 10/2008; 23(10):993-1000. DOI: 10.1002/gps.2020
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper examines possible mechanisms that may explain the bi-directional relationship between vascular disease and depression.
A literature review was carried out using Medline from 1996 to 2007, using relevant key words including vascular depression, and supplemented by key references to earlier work.
Several mechanisms were considered including: autonomic dysfunction, platelet activation, hypothalamic pituitary axis activation, endothelial dysfunction, cytokines, omega 3 fatty acids, genetics, homocysteine and effects of treatment.
The relationship between vascular disease and depression cannot solely be explained by current established risk factors or the effects of treatment for depression. Other mechanisms must apply, and there is some evidence for common genetic factors. Promising future lines of investigation include homocysteine, cytokines and endothelial dysfunction. More longitudinal studies combined with measurements of these biomarkers are needed.

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    • "The demographic stratifications showing higher female incidence and age distribution profiles are comparable to those reported in the literature [1–3,8–14]. The demonstration of well-established depression risk factors including hypertension [8] [9] [10], diabetes [4,8–10], CHD [4,8–10], stroke [8] [9] [10], PD [11] [12], and dementia [13] [14], associated with increased incidence rates of depression in both COM and control groups also supports the validity of the data presented in this report. Second, the large sample size obtained adequate power for stratification into subgroups for statistical analyses and enabled us to ascertain the impact of COM on depression risk, particularly in the younger age-group in whom the cause of depression might be less certain. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    • "The demographic stratifications showing higher female incidence and age distribution profiles are comparable to those reported in the literature [1–3,8–14]. The demonstration of well-established depression risk factors including hypertension [8] [9] [10], diabetes [4,8–10], CHD [4,8–10], stroke [8] [9] [10], PD [11] [12], and dementia [13] [14], associated with increased incidence rates of depression in both COM and control groups also supports the validity of the data presented in this report. Second, the large sample size obtained adequate power for stratification into subgroups for statistical analyses and enabled us to ascertain the impact of COM on depression risk, particularly in the younger age-group in whom the cause of depression might be less certain. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
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    • "Endothelial function has a key role in determining the clinical presentation of atherosclerosis, and it is involved in developing the atherosclerosis process before overt CVD.[12] Limited data are available about the association of CRP levels and endothelial dysfunction with mood characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression/anxiety symptoms with CRP level, as a marker of systemic inflammation, and also with flow-mediated dilation (FMD), as a marker of endothelial function. "
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have shown the association of mood disorders and endothelial dysfunction, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease; however, mediatory mechanisms are not entirely clarified in this regard. We investigated the relationship between depression/anxiety symptoms with systemic inflammation and endothelial function. This cross-sectional study was performed in 2011 on employees of an oil company located in the Isfahan city (central Iran). Participants were selected with clustered random sampling. Anxiety and depression were evaluated by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Systemic inflammatory status was evaluated by measuring sensitive C-reactive protein (high sensitive-CRP). To evaluate the endothelial function flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured. During the study period, 254 participants (mean age = 51.4 ± 6.1 years) were evaluated. No significant relationship was found between high sensitive-CRP or FMD and any of the variables of anxiety or depression. In multivariate analysis, by controlling the possible confounding factors, no association was found between anxiety score, depression, or the overall score of HADS with high sensitive-CRP or FMD. After the separate analysis of patients with and without diabetes, depression score was correlated inversely with FMD among patients with diabetes (r = 0.525, P = 0.021). According to the results, in the studied population, there was no relationship between anxiety/depression with systemic inflammation or endothelial dysfunction, while in individuals with diabetes, depression was associated with endothelial dysfunction. In this regard more cohort studies are recommended.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of research in medical sciences
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