Article

Branched oligosaccharide structures on HBV prevent interaction with both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Journal of Viral Hepatitis (Impact Factor: 3.91). 06/2008; 15(9):675-83. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2893.2008.00993.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that infects the liver as primary target. Currently, a high affinity receptor for HBV is still unknown. The dendritic cell specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is involved in pathogen recognition through mannose and fucose containing carbohydrates leading to the induction of an anti-viral immune response. Many glycosylated viruses subvert this immune surveillance function and exploit DC-SIGN as a port of entry and for trans-infection of target cells. The glycosylation pattern on HBV surface antigens (HBsAg) together with the tissue distribution of HBV would allow interaction between HBV and DC-SIGN and its liver-expressed homologue L-SIGN. Therefore, a detailed study to investigate the binding of HBV to DC-SIGN and L-SIGN was performed. For HCV, both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN are known to bind envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. Soluble DC-SIGN and L-SIGN specifically bound HCV virus-like particles, but no interaction with either HBsAg or HepG2.2.15-derived HBV was detected. Also, neither DC-SIGN nor L-SIGN transfected Raji cells bound HBsAg. In contrast, highly mannosylated HBV, obtained by treating HBV producing HepG2.2.15 cells with the alpha-mannosidase I inhibitor kifunensine, is recognized by DC-SIGN. The alpha-mannosidase I trimming of N-linked oligosaccharide structures thus prevents recognition by DC-SIGN. On the basis of these findings, it is tempting to speculate that HBV exploits mannose trimming as a way to escape recognition by DC-SIGN and thereby subvert a possible immune activation response.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Andrea Woltman, Sep 03, 2014
  • Source
    • "Although the biological significance of the varying glycosylation levels of HBsAg is unclear, the glycosylation of the HBV structural protein may be an important mechanism for the virus to escape recognition by APCs. Evidence for this hypothesis is provided by Op den Brouw et al., who indicated that branched oligosaccharide structures on HBV prevent its interaction with both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN, allowing it to subvert the host immune response [30]. In addition to different glycosylation levels, HBsAg derived from different origins are diverse in their phospholipid moieties. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Type I Interferon (IFN) is one of the first lines of defense against viral infection. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are professional IFN-α-producing cells that play an important role in the antiviral immune response. Previous studies have reported that IFN-α production is impaired in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. However, the mechanisms underlying the impairment in IFN-α production are not fully understood. Here, we report that plasma-derived hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBsAg expressed in CHO cells can significantly inhibit toll like receptor (TLR) 9-mediated Interferon-α (IFN-α) production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors. Further analysis indicated that monocytes participate in the inhibitory effect of HBsAg on pDCs through the secretion of TNF-α and IL-10. Furthermore, TLR9 expression on pDCs was down-regulated by TNF-α, IL-10 and HBsAg treatment. This down-regulation may partially explain the inhibition of IFN-α production in pDCs. In conclusion, we determined that HBsAg inhibited the production of IFN-α by pDCs through the induction of monocytes that secreted TNF-α and IL-10 and through the down-regulation of TLR9 expression on pDCs. These data may aid in the development of effective antiviral treatments and lead to the immune control of the viral infections.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    • "A difference in ligand specificity is the obvious explanation, although DEC-205 ligands still need to be determined (Shrimpton et al., 2009). More surprisingly is the observed recognition of HBsAg by MR, but not by DC-SIGN (Op den Brouw et al., 2008b). Whereas most pathogens recognized by the MR also show interaction with DC-SIGN, e.g. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in anti-viral immunity. Direct interactions between DC and hepatitis B virus (HBV) may explain the impaired DC function and the ineffective anti-viral response of chronic HBV patients resulting in HBV persistence. Here, the interaction between HBV surface antigens (HBsAg) and DC and the receptor involved were examined by flow cytometry in blood and liver tissue of HBV patients. The in vitro data showed that the mannose receptor (MR) is involved in HBsAg recognition and uptake by DC. The presence of HBsAg-positive DC was demonstrated sporadically in blood, but frequently in the liver of HBV patients. Interestingly, a positive correlation was found between HBsAg positivity and MR expression level in both liver- and blood-derived DC. These data suggest that in HBV infected patients, MR-mediated interaction between HBsAg and DC and subsequent impairment of DC predominantly occurs at the main site of infection, the liver.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2009 · Virology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that infects the liver as primary target. Currently, a high affinity receptor for HBV is still unknown. The dendritic cell specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is involved in pathogen recognition through mannose and fucose containing carbohydrates leading to the induction of an anti-viral immune response. Many glycosylated viruses subvert this immune surveillance function and exploit DC-SIGN as a port of entry and for trans-infection of target cells. The glycosylation pattern on HBV surface antigens (HBsAg) together with the tissue distribution of HBV would allow interaction between HBV and DC-SIGN and its liver-expressed homologue L-SIGN. Therefore, a detailed study to investigate the binding of HBV to DC-SIGN and L-SIGN was performed. For HCV, both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN are known to bind envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. Soluble DC-SIGN and L-SIGN specifically bound HCV virus-like particles, but no interaction with either HBsAg or HepG2.2.15-derived HBV was detected. Also, neither DC-SIGN nor L-SIGN transfected Raji cells bound HBsAg. In contrast, highly mannosylated HBV, obtained by treating HBV producing HepG2.2.15 cells with the alpha-mannosidase I inhibitor kifunensine, is recognized by DC-SIGN. The alpha-mannosidase I trimming of N-linked oligosaccharide structures thus prevents recognition by DC-SIGN. On the basis of these findings, it is tempting to speculate that HBV exploits mannose trimming as a way to escape recognition by DC-SIGN and thereby subvert a possible immune activation response.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2008 · Journal of Viral Hepatitis
Show more