Article

Use of tyre pyrolysis oil in diesel engines

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajalakshmi Engineering College, Chennai 602 105, Tamil Nadu, India.
Waste Management (Impact Factor: 3.22). 06/2008; 28(12):2743-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2008.03.007
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Tests have been carried out to evaluate the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fueled with 10%, 30%, and 50% of tyre pyrolysis oil (TPO) blended with diesel fuel (DF). The TPO was derived from waste automobile tyres through vacuum pyrolysis. The combustion parameters such as heat release rate, cylinder peak pressure, and maximum rate of pressure rise also analysed. Results showed that the brake thermal efficiency of the engine fueled with TPO-DF blends increased with an increase in blend concentration and reduction of DF concentration. NO(x), HC, CO, and smoke emissions were found to be higher at higher loads due to the high aromatic content and longer ignition delay. The cylinder peak pressure increased from 71 bars to 74 bars. The ignition delays were longer than with DF. It is concluded that it is possible to use tyre pyrolysis oil in diesel engines as an alternate fuel in the future.

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    • "This reactor offers interesting features for waste pyrolysis, such as (i) suitability for handling particles with irregular texture and D-group particles (according to the Geldart classification), (ii) isothermicity and good heat transfer , favored by counter-current gas–solid contact in most of the bed, (iii) low segregation and (iv) vigorous gas–solid contact. Pyrolysis produces a liquid fraction known as tire oil [13] [14], which is a potential combustion fuel [15] [16]. Indeed, we have recently reviewed the pathways for obtaining fuels from tires indicating the potentiality of using its tire oil [1]. "
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    • "Rubber which undergoes pyrolysis is being converted into three types of product: solid carbon-like powder, oil and gas. Oil originated in this process, due to its high calorific value (41-44 MJ/kg), has been already tested as an alternative diesel fuel [2] [3] [4] but high concentration of sulphur (Tab. 1) in the oil increases emission of sulphur oxides into the atmosphere during its burning in the diesel engine. This makes application of pyrolysis oil, as a car fuel, still limited. "
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    • "It can be seen from Fig. 7(b) that the peak of premixed combustion for R20 is prominent, as it has the longest ignition delay which may be associated with the lowest cetane number of R20. Murugan et al. [19] [20] found longer ignition delays using tyre pyrolysis oil diesel blends. The peak of the premixed combustion HRR (Fig. 7 "
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