The schizophrenia and Toxoplasma gondii connection: Infectious, immune or both?

ArticleinAdvances in Therapy 25(7):703-9 · July 2008with20 Reads
DOI: 10.1007/s12325-008-0063-5 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Recent research has suggested a possible link between toxoplasmic agents and schizophrenia. We aimed to assess this by measuring Toxoplasma gondii-associated antibodies in schizophrenia patients and controls We used a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit to measure the level of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies in serum samples from schizophrenia patients (n=40) and from a group of non-schizophrenic control subjects (n=37) Among schizophrenic patients, 16 (40%) showed IgG seropositivity and two (5%) showed IgM seropositivity. Among the control group, five (13.5%) were found have IgG seropositivity and one (2.7%) showed IgM seropositivity. In our study we found that IgG T gondii antibodies were significantly higher in schizophrenia patients compared with controls This study supports the theory that toxoplasmic agents may have a role in the aetiology of schizophrenia.
    • "Previous research has shown an increase in the antibody response to Toxoplasma proteins in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders [1]. A study performed on US soldiers found that the first occurrence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies was detected in frozen blood samples collected from subjects that were later demilitarized because of their psychiatric disease 6 months and often even 2-3 years before the onset of the schizophrenia [2]. "
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2016
    • "Previous research has shown an increase in the antibody response to Toxoplasma proteins in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders [1]. A study performed on US soldiers found that the first occurrence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies was detected in frozen blood samples collected from subjects that were later demilitarized because of their psychiatric disease 6 months and often even 2-3 years before the onset of the schizophrenia [2]. "
    Article · Apr 2016
    • "Schizophrenia, like multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, is a chronic illness of the central nervous system and as such, infectious agents can also be blamed as a potential etiological factor, perhaps in persons who also have an increased genetic susceptibility (Torrey and Yolken 2003, Çelik et al. 2013 ). In recent years, serological studies on patients with schizophrenia have been carried out showing that the rate of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies were higher in patients than in all the selected control groups (Yolken et al. 2001, Çetinkaya et al. 2007, Tamer et al. 2008). We did not compare seropositivity rate in the study group with a healthy control group, which was out of the range of this study, but the overall anti-Toxoplasma IgG positivity in our patient study group was 46% and the diffference between the seropositivity rates of two gender was not statistically significant. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between various clinical aspects of schizophrenia and seropositivity against Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908). We selected 94 patients with schizophrenia and investigated the seropositivity rate for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies by ELISA. Clinical parameters of schizophrenic patients such as illness type and status, clinical course, awareness of the illness and need for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) were compared with their serological status. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were detected in 43 (46%) of schizophrenic patients. Chronic patients had a rate of 34 (72%) seropositivity, whereas 9 (22%) of the patients with partial remission showed evidence of latent toxoplasmosis. Of continuous patients, 35 (81%) were found to be seropositive and this rate was significantly more than in the other groups. The rate of latent toxoplasmosis was detected significantly higher in patients who lack awareness of schizophrenia (36, i.e. 72%) than the patients who were aware of their illnesses (7, i.e. 16%). Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were detected in 38 (70%) of ECT performed patients while this percentage was 13% in the ones who had never been treated with ECT. This difference was also statistically significant. We showed that Toxoplasma-infected subjects had 15× higher probability of having continuous course of disease than Toxoplasma-free subjects. Our results put forth the possibility of latent toxoplasmosis to have a negative impact on the course of schizophrenia and treatment response of schizophrenic patients.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015
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