Selective and Sustained Attention as Predictors of Social Problems in Children With Typical and Disordered Attention Abilities

Article (PDF Available)inJournal of Attention Disorders 12(4):341-52 · August 2008with 156 Reads
DOI: 10.1177/1087054708320440 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Investigated the relationship between selective and sustained attention and social behavior in children with different degrees of attentional disturbance. Participants were 101 6- to 12-year-old children, including 18 who were diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), 61 who were clinically referred for attentional difficulties but did not meet criteria for ADHD, and 22 typically developing children. Two groups of children completed either a sustained attention task or a selective attention task. Task performance was compared with teacher reported social behavior. In support of the investigator's hypothesis poor performance on the sustained attention task correlated with social behavior problems. However, contrary to expectation, poor performance on the selective attention task was not correlated with teacher reported social problems. Results are discussed with specific emphasis on the need to identify underlying cognitive contributions to social dysfunction. The findings support a growing body of research highlighting the negative relationship between inattention and social functioning.
  • ... Over the first year of life infants shift from reactive, passive information seeking to more volitional control of attention (see Colombo, 2001;Ruff & Rothbart, 1996), including the ability to sustain attention and inhibit shifting to distracting or competing stimulation (Colombo & Cheatham, 2006;Ruff & Capozzoli, 2003). Greater sustained attention pre- dicts better social and cognitive outcomes (Andrade, Brodeur, Waschbusch, Stewart, & McGee, 2009;Colombo et al., 2004;Murphy, Laurie-Rose, Brinkman, & McNamara, 2007). For exam- ple, "short lookers' are thought to process information more effi- ciently and show better developmental outcomes than "long look- ers" (for a review, see Bornstein & Colombo, 2012). ...
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  • ... It can be contrasted to sustained attention, the other component of attention. Some studies suggest that reflexive and sustained attention are independent components of overall attention (Barry et al., 2001; Berger et al., 2005; Andrade et al., 2009; Underbjerg et al., 2013; Dye and Hauser, 2014). Studies using habituation and paired comparisons (Fantz, 1961; Fagan, 1970; Bornstein and Sigman, 1986) have found that infant measures of information processing can predict child information processing (Fagan and Singer, 1983; Rose and Wallace, 1985; Dougherty and Haith, 1997; Rose and Feldman, 1997; Rose et al., 2003; Kavsek, 2004). ...
    ... This study should involve many time points and verify the genes involved in predicting risk and the eventual development of inattentive symptoms. Although it is unclear how reflexive attention and sustained attention are related (Hikosaka et al., 1993; Suzuki and Cavanagh, 1997; Barry et al., 2001; Berger et al., 2005; Andrade et al., 2009; Henderickx et al., 2010; Carrasco, 2011; Macaluso and Doricchi, 2013; Underbjerg et al., 2013; Dye and Hauser, 2014; Anderson, 2015), my previous work has indicated that reflexive attention is related to day-to-day attentional performance (Lundwall, 2013). Second, in conjunction with the above, several comparison intervention programs could be targeted earlier to determine which are most effective. ...
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  • ... Also, findings of this study showed that intent attribution was positively associated with reactive aggression. Meanwhile children with ADHD positive intention interact with peers jump into activities at unfortunate moments (Andrade, Brodeur, Waschbusch, Stewart, & McGee, 2009). Which makes peers that irritated, and manipulate (Hodgens, Cole, & Boldizar, 2000). ...
    ... For example, impulsivity, which is a defining characteristic of ADHD (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) is also a defining characteristic of reactive aggression (Atkins, Osbome, Bennett, Hess, & Halperin, 2001; Waschbusch, 2002). Second, the symptoms of ADHD are likely to impair children's ability to accurately assess social situations, similarly, inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity may impair the generation, selection, and enactment of social responses (Andrade, Brodeur, Waschbusch, Stewart, & McGee, 2009). It was confirmed by Atkins and Stoff (1993) that children with ADHD, have higher levels of reactive or hostile types of aggression than those without ADHD. ...
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