A Comparative Study of Interventions for Delaying The Initiation of Sexual Intercourse Among Latino And Black Youth

Article · December 2011with21 Reads
DOI: 10.1363/4324711 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Latino and black adolescents are disproportionately affected by STDs, including HIV, and unintended pregnancies. Few parent-based interventions have targeted these youth, focused on early adolescence and had high participation rates. Between 2003 and 2009, a randomized clinical trial was conducted with 2,016 Latino and black mother-adolescent dyads in New York City. Adolescents were eligible if they were in grade 6 or 7. Dyads were assigned to one of three conditions: a parent-based intervention, Families Talking Together (FTT); an adolescent-only intervention, Making a Difference! (MAD); or a combined FTT+MAD intervention. Respondents completed questionnaires at baseline and 12 months later. Single-degree-of-freedom contrasts and logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate differences in outcomes by intervention. The proportion of youth who reported ever having engaged in vaginal intercourse increased over the study period by eight percentage points among those in the MAD group, five points in the FTT group and three points in the combined group; the differences among these increases were not statistically significant. Adolescents in the two FTT groups were significantly more likely than those in the MAD group to indicate that their mother had talked to them about not having intercourse (79% vs. 68%). They also scored higher than youth in the MAD group on measures of communication and perceived maternal attributes, and lower on activities that might lead to risky behaviors. The proportions of adolescents who initiated intercourse during the study period were not significantly different across groups, implying that the interventions were comparable. Findings suggest that FTT may have led to improved parenting behaviors.
    • in delaying adolescent initiation of sexual intercourse ( Guilama-Ramos et al., 2011). Social workers should help parents understand the connection between their communication, the relationships they have with their youths, and the sexual behaviors of their youths.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The high rates of sexual risk behaviors, particularly among African American youths who may not be aware of their HIV status, provide indication that, unless prevention efforts are enhanced, this vulnerable group of youths will remain at greater risk for negative health status outcomes. Parents are important in efforts to reduce risk among youths and often have a willingness to be sexuality educators for their children; however, communication barriers often impede their ability to provide preventive sexual health knowledge to their youths. Social workers are often presented with opportunities to help parents develop effective sexual health communication skills in informal settings when formal interventions are not feasible. The present effort considers solution-focused strategies social workers can use to help parents overcome barriers and communicate more positively with their youths about sexual health.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015
    • Sons took a brief survey about sexual behaviors and parent-child communication because of the sensitive nature of asking young adolescents sexual questions in a face-to-face interview format. The 17 question survey took about 10 minutes to complete (Table 1) and was developed after exploring several instruments used in parentbased sexual health interventions222324. The survey was meant to serve as a simplified way of gathering sensitive information from adolescent boys and was not meant for rigorous quantitative analysis.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Parent-child sexual health communication is a well-documented protective factor against early sexual debut and other sexual risk behaviors. Yet, little is known about communication between single, African American mother-early adolescent son dyads. To address this, a mixed method, qualitative dominant, study design was used to explore the dynamics of sexual health communication between single African-American mothers and their early adolescent sons aged 11-14 years old. Methods: Mothers and sons, recruited from community health fairs and after-school programs, participated in separate in-depth semi-structured interviews to explore mother-son sexual health communication and sons completed a brief survey about sexual activity. Results: Mothers and sons expressed both comforts and discomforts with communication. Most mothers and sons reported high connectedness and felt comfortable talking with their sons about sex. Most sons agreed with the content of the sexual health message reported by their mothers, identified their mothers as approachable, and some sons reported that they would talk with their mothers before they started having sex. Mothers report providing a two-prong message to delay sexual debut and use condoms when sexually active and a strong desire to have their son disclose his intentions to sexually debut in order to facilitate sexual health decision-making and provide access to condoms. Findings from this study provide preliminary descriptive data that can be used by providers to facilitate parent-child sexual health communication during early adolescence and prior to a child's sexual debut.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · American Journal of Sexuality Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Latina adolescent parents are at increased risk for rapid repeat births (second birth ≤ 24 months after the first), sexually transmitted infections, and negative educational and social outcomes. Although several effective parent-based interventions have been developed to prevent Latino youths' sexual risk taking, little research has explored the development of interventions to prevent repeat births that involve the parents of these adolescents. Existing preventative interventions involving parents suffer from important methodological limitations. Additional research is needed to advance theories of behavior, identify the causal pathways of parental influence, and specify appropriate behavioral targets. Future parent-based interventions to prevent repeat births should target pregnancy intentions, age of partners, contraceptive use, integrated prevention of pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections, educational attainment, and future orientations.
    Article · Aug 2012
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  • Chapter · Jan 2014 · American Journal of Sexuality Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We present the feasibility and acceptability of a parent sexuality education program led by peer educators in community settings. We also report the results of an outcome evaluation with 71 parents who were randomized to the intervention or a control group, and surveyed one month prior to and six months after the 4-week intervention. The program was highly feasible and acceptable to participants, and the curriculum was implemented with a high level of fidelity and facilitator quality. Pilot data show promising outcomes for increasing parental knowledge, communication, and monitoring of their adolescent children.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014
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November 2013 · Journal of Adolescent Health · Impact Factor: 3.61
Article
October 2014
Background: Parent-child sexual health communication is a well-documented protective factor against early sexual debut and other sexual risk behaviors. Yet, little is known about communication between single, African American mother-early adolescent son dyads. To address this, a mixed method, qualitative dominant, study design was used to explore the dynamics of sexual health communication... [Show full abstract]
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September 2016 · The Journal of Prevention
Teen pregnancy remains a public health concern particularly among Latinos, whose pregnancy rate of 83.5 per 1000 girls constitutes one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy among all ethnic and racial groups in the United States. To enhance the effectiveness of interventions for diverse Latino populations in the US, it is crucial to assess the community's understanding of the etiology of the... [Show full abstract]
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August 2015 · Health & social work · Impact Factor: 0.94
The high rates of sexual risk behaviors, particularly among African American youths who may not be aware of their HIV status, provide indication that, unless prevention efforts are enhanced, this vulnerable group of youths will remain at greater risk for negative health status outcomes. Parents are important in efforts to reduce risk among youths and often have a willingness to be sexuality... [Show full abstract]
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