Article

Body size and breast cancer risk: The Multiethnic Cohort

Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.
International Journal of Cancer (Impact Factor: 5.09). 09/2012; 131(5):E705-16. DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27373
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The influence of body size on postmenopausal breast cancer risk was investigated among five racial/ethnic groups in the Multiethnic Cohort. Participants were 45-75 years old at recruitment (1993-1996), living in Hawaii and California. Of the 82,971 White, African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese and Latina women included in this analysis, 3,030 were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Body mass index (BMI), height, weight and adulthood weight gain were associated with a significantly higher risk and, with the exception of height, were found to vary across ethnic groups. Native Hawaiians and Japanese with a BMI≥30.0 compared to 20.0-24.9 kg/m2 had the highest risk (hazard ratio=1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.31, 2.54, p-trend=0.001, and hazard ratio=1.59, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 2.05, p-trend<0.0001, respectively). Current hormone replacement therapy use modified the impact of a high BMI, as non- and former users had a significantly higher risk compared to current users. BMI also had a more pronounced risk for advanced tumors compared to localized tumors. When both BMI and adult weight gain were analyzed simultaneously, adult weight gain, rather than BMI, was a significant risk factor overall. These findings emphasize the significance of maintaining a healthy weight throughout adulthood for the prevention of postmenopausal breast cancer.

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    • "0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 Baer (2006) Weiderpass (2004) McCullough (2005) Green (2011) Michels−Blanck (1996) van den Brandt (2000) Canchola (2012) Lacey (2009) Kabat (2014) White (2012) Sonnenschein (1999) De Stavola (1993) Freni (1996) Tulinius (1997) Macinnis (2004) Vatten (1992) Tretli (1989) Wiren (2014) Ahlgren (2004) Mellemkjaer (2012) Tornberg (1988) Ritte (2013) Kaaks (1998) Kabat (2013) Wormser (2012) Kabat (2013) Subtotal Subtotal ER−/PR− ER+/PR+ PR− PR+ ER− ER+ Postmenopausal Premenopausal By subgroups Self-reported height Measured height All studies combined 359 242 359 242 359 242 359 242 433 810 433 810 3 111 070 2 801 907 5 216 302 3 025 197 108 829 99 717 409 093 1 297 124 428 653 337 819 52 642 70 575 192 514 19 815 8 416 2 191 105 6 706 7 622 11 580 13 598 25 967 567 333 297 156 117 415 23 864 46 570 306 600 11 480 144 701 522 257 88 256 1 302 5 176 1 640 5 176 1 845 7 947 63 606 15 439 113 178 66 892 1 315 733 4 265 39 299 2 226 4 385 2 321 2 085 9 169 835 259 46 286 168 182 439 357 291 8 427 6 161 3 340 1 209 1 182 9 307 275 6 798 3 926 4 224 1.08 (0.99 to 1.18) 1.16 (1.10 to 1.22) 1.11 (1.02 to 1.20) 1.16 (1.10 to 1.22) 1.00 (0.87 to 1.14) 1.18 (1.13 to 1.23) 1.17 (1.14 to 1.21) 1.16 (1.12 to 1.21) 1.23 (1.12 to 1.36) 1.22 (1.00 to 1.34) 1.19 (1.12 to 1.26) 1.17 (1.15 to 1.19) 1.12 (1.05 to 1.21) 1.12 (1.07 to 1.18) 1.12 (1.05 to 1.20) 1.11 (0.98 to 1.26) 1.09 (1.06 to 1.13) 1.09 (0.98 to 1.21) 1.08 (0.90 to 1.30) 1.38 (1.21 to 1.57) 1.36 (1.02 to 1.81) 1.31 (1.10 to 1.55) 1.27 (1.07 to 1.52) 1.25 (1.13 to 1.39) 1.24 (1.19 to 1.29) 1.23 (1.18 to 1.29) 1.23 (1.16 to 1.31) 1.23 (1.13 to 1.35) 1.21 (1.10 to 1.34) 1.18 (1.15 to 1.22) 1.14 (0.92 to 1.41) 1.14 (1.10 to 1.18) 1.13 (1.07 to 1.18) 1.12 (1.06 to 1.17) 1.14 (1.11 to 1.17) 1.20 (1.17 to 1.23) 1.17 (1.15 to 1.19) Author (published year) Total samples (N) Events (n) RR (95% CI) per 10 cm increase P heterogeneity < .001 I −squared = 61% "
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