Article

Compliance with recommended dosing intervals for HPV vaccination among females, 13-17 years, National Immunization Survey-Teen, 2008-2009

Immunization Services Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, MS A-19, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.62). 11/2011; 30(3):503-5. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.11.042
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Data from the 2008 and 2009 National Immunization Survey-Teen were analyzed to determine age at initiation of the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) series among females 13-17 years (n=7594) and assess compliance with the recommended HPV dosing intervals. Among females who initiated the HPV series, 56.7% of females<13 years at the time of the HPV vaccine recommendation publication did so by age 13; while the majority of females 13-14 and 15-17 years at the time of the recommendation publication did so at ages 14 (44.4%) and 16 (46.7%), respectively. Forty-six percent of females who received three doses completed the vaccination series in a period longer than the recommended time interval. Series completion at an earlier age to ensure protection before sexual debut is optimal. Improved provider communication of the need for three doses for long-term protection and implementing clinical practice guidelines to use reminder-recall systems may increase HPV completion.

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    • "In order to improve HPV vaccination, it is essential to understand current patterns of HPV vaccination. While previous research has primarily focused on HPV vaccine initiation and completion among adolescent girls, the adherence of recommended HPV dose schedules has not been well assessed [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22]. The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine HPV vaccine completion and dose adherence among commercially insured females who were aged 9 through 26 years old and had initiated HPV vaccination; (2) identify factors associated with HPV vaccine completion and dose adherence among these females. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Although HPV vaccination has been recommended for use in girls and young women since 2007, HPV vaccine uptake is low in the US. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the 2008-2011 MarketScan data to examine HPV vaccine completion and dose adherence among commercially insured females aged 9-26 years. We performed multivariable logistic regression models to examine factors related to HPV vaccine completion and HPV vaccine dose adherence. Results: Among 378,484 females aged 9-26 years who initiated HPV vaccination, only 29.4% completed HPV vaccination. Compared with females receiving vaccines from primary care providers, those receiving vaccines from OB/GYN providers were more likely to complete the vaccine series. Age at HPV vaccine initiation, health insurance plan, seasonal pattern, and flu vaccination were also significantly associated with vaccine completion. Among 111,286 females who completed HPV vaccination, 62.4% received all doses within 30 days of the recommended schedules. Similar factors relating to HPV vaccine completion were consistently associated with HPV vaccine dose adherence. However, younger age (<22 years) and receipt of flu vaccine were negatively related to HPV vaccine dose adherence. Conclusions: Intervention programs to improve HPV vaccine reminding system and reduce logistic barriers for both physicians and patients are warranted.
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    ABSTRACT: To provide a clinically relevant synopsis of recent research findings as well as updated guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices regarding child and adolescent immunizations. Childhood vaccinations have served to dramatically reduce pediatric morbidity and mortality in the USA. Much of the recent research has focused on the improvement of current vaccines as well as on the development of new vaccines. By improving the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of vaccinations, children can be more fully protected. Additionally, recommendations have broadened as vaccinations have been proven well tolerated and effective for a growing number of subpopulations. Although more groups of children are now included in vaccination recommendations, efforts must continue to ensure that all eligible children receive their vaccinations. This article reviews selected recent publications on influenza, human papillomavirus, the childhood and adolescent/adult formulations of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis, meningococcal conjugate and pneumococcal vaccines. The relationship between febrile seizures and childhood immunizations is explored. The research on childhood and adolescent vaccinations is continuously growing and will serve to shape future recommendations. Through their findings, we can learn how to optimize the protection of all children and adolescents against these very serious diseases.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review To provide a clinically relevant synopsis of recent research findings as well as updated recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding adolescent immunizations. Recent findings Coverage rates for the adolescent vaccinations continue to lag behind those of the childhood vaccinations, despite their importance. Recent research has focused on the reasons for suboptimal adolescent vaccination rates as well as strategies for improvement. By more fully understanding the barriers to immunization, efforts can be implemented to address these concerns and to ensure that all eligible adolescents receive their vaccinations. In addition, much work has focused on the duration of protection induced by childhood and adolescent vaccinations and the need for booster doses in older adolescents. Because immunity has been found to wane after vaccination, these booster doses can serve to more fully protect adolescents. This article reviews selected recent publications on human papillomavirus, meningococcal conjugate, and tetanus and diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccines. Summary Adolescent vaccinations will continue to be studied and this research will serve to shape future recommendations. Through this work, we can learn the best methods to optimize the protection of all adolescents against these very serious diseases.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Current Opinion in Pediatrics
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