Article

On the relationship between temperament, metacognition, and anxiety: Independent and mediated effects

a Faculty of Psychology , University of Warsaw , ul. Stawki 5/7, 00-183 , Warsaw , Poland.
Anxiety, stress, and coping (Impact Factor: 1.55). 10/2011; 25(6):697-709. DOI: 10.1080/10615806.2011.630071
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Abstract The present study examined the relations between temperamental traits distinguished in regulative theory of temperament, state anxiety, and metacognition as postulated in self-regulatory executive function (S-REF) theory of emotional disorder. Data analysis (n=315) consisted of independent and mediated effect analyses. Of the six traits, briskness, emotional reactivity and perseveration correlated significantly with both state anxiety and metacognitions (emotional reactivity and perseveration correlated positively, and briskness - negatively). These traits were predictors of state anxiety. Metacognition predicted state anxiety and relationships were independent of temperament. A mediating effect of metacognition was confirmed for the general index as well as negative and positive belief subscales. The findings support the metacognitive model of psychopathology and suggest that temperament is associated with metacognitions implicated in psychopathology and may have both direct and metacognitively mediated effects on anxiety.

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    • "Cognitive performance is impacted by level of self-esteem (Robinson et al., 2013), anxiety and depression (Eysenck et al., 2007; McIntyre et al., 2013). Studies performed in clinical and nonclinical populations have shown that poor metacognitive knowledge is positively associated with anxiety symptoms (Dragan et al., 2012), pathological worry (Papageorgiou and Wells, 2003) and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (Myers and Wells, 2013). Lysaker et al. (2011) showed that high level of metacognitive knowledge was positively associated with high level of self-esteem and low level of anxiety in persons with schizophrenia. "
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    ABSTRACT: This study explored in a non-clinical sample the associations between self-esteem, anxiety and depression symptoms and metacognitive awareness or metacognitive knowledge. Higher metacognitive awareness scores measured during the neuropsychological tasks were positively associated with higher depression scores in the social cognition test. Metacognitive knowledge score measured independently of ongoing neuropsychological tasks was positively associated with lower self-esteem, higher anxiety (state or trait) and depression scores.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
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    • "In particular, these researchers have indicated the MCQ2 variable as the important mediator for the relation self-directness and self-transcendence and hallucination proneness. Interestingly, MCQ mediators between RTT traits and anxiety have been also established in normal (Dragan et al., 2012) and clinical populations (Dragan and Dragan, 2014). These previous results and our study, taken together, suggest that metacognition, especially negative beliefs about uncontrollability of thoughts and danger, is a more general pathway linking biologically related traits with psychopathology. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    • "In particular, these researchers have indicated the MCQ2 variable as the important mediator for the relation self-directness and self-transcendence and hallucination proneness. Interestingly, MCQ mediators between RTT traits and anxiety have been also established in normal (Dragan et al., 2012) and clinical populations (Dragan and Dragan, 2014). These previous results and our study, taken together, suggest that metacognition, especially negative beliefs about uncontrollability of thoughts and danger, is a more general pathway linking biologically related traits with psychopathology. "
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated whether dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs (negative beliefs about uncontrollability and danger of thoughts) mediate the relationship between temperamental characteristics of behavior and hallucinatory-like experiences in healthy subjects (n=137). Our analyses showed that four temperamental traits (emotional reactivity, perseveration, endurance and briskness) were mediated by negative beliefs about uncontrollability and danger of thoughts in relation to hallucination proneness. Our research tentatively suggests that temperament affects hallucination proneness via metacognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychiatry Research
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