Article

An exploration of Singaporean parental experiences in managing school-aged children's postoperative pain: A descriptive qualitative approach

Division of Nursing, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.
Journal of Clinical Nursing (Impact Factor: 1.26). 11/2011; 21(5-6):860-9. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03911.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To enhance understanding of the experience of parents in managing their children's postoperative pain in Singapore.
Parents play a significant role in their hospitalised child's postoperative pain care. Their active involvement may contribute to accurate pain assessment and effective pain management for their child. However, there is a lack of in-depth research exploring the experience of parents involved in their children's postoperative pain management.
This study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach, which is situated in the interpretive paradigm.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from 14 parents whose children were hospitalised in one of the three paediatric surgical wards in a hospital in Singapore in December 2009. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.
Three themes were identified: 'Actions used by parents to alleviate their child's postoperative pain', 'Factors influencing parents' management of their child's postoperative pain' and 'Parents' needs in the process of caring for their child's postoperative pain'. Parents used a range of non-pharmacological pain relief interventions for their child. Parental roles and expectations, bond between parent and child, support from nurses, family and own religious beliefs, as well as children's age and maturity level were factors which promoted parental participation, whereas parents' negative feelings, knowledge deficit and nurses' busy schedule were hindering factors. Parents expressed needs for more involvement in their child's care, adequate rest and information support from nurses.
This study highlights the importance of involving parents in their child's postoperative pain management. It provides evidence for health care professionals to pay attention to factors that may influence parental participation and, therefore, guide their practice.
Nurses need to provide parents with support and education to facilitate their roles and improve their child's postoperative pain management.

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    • "In a descriptive qualitative study aimed at understanding parents' experiences managing children's postoperative pain at a Singapore pediatric hospital, Lim et al. (2012) report that factors affecting parental participation in care included support from nurses, children's age, knowledge deficit, and nurses' busy schedules. These authors conclude that nurses need to provide parents with support and education in order to facilitate their roles and improve their child's postoperative pain management. "
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    ABSTRACT: Pediatric care has greatly evolved during the past 30 years, moving from a traditional, medically oriented approach to a more consultative, interactive model. In the literature, the concept of partnership has been explored and presented in various terms, including presence, collaboration, involvement, and participation. The models of partnership that have been proposed have rarely been evaluated, and do not take the unique environment of ambulatory care into account. Based on a literature review, strong clinical experience with families, and previous research with parents and health professionals, both the conceptual and empirical phases of a new model are described. This model can be adapted to other pediatric health care contexts in either primary or tertiary care and should be evaluated in terms of efficacy and usefulness.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing
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    • "Therefore, parental involvement is one of the crucial factors in achieving optimal pain management for children (Kankkunen, Vehvil€ ainen- Julkunen, Pietil€ a, & Halonen, 2003; Wright, Stewart, Finley, & Buffett-Jerrott, 2007). However, previous studies show that parents often lack information, instruction and knowledge in managing children's postoperative pain (Kristensson-Hallstrom, 2000; Lim et al., 2012), and parents' implementation of nonpharmacologic methods is limited to those that were familiar to them from everyday life (Kankkunen et al., 2003; Lim et al., 2012; Sng et al., 2013). Parents need more help from nurses concerning preparatory information and nonpharmacologic methods (He, P€ olkki, Pietil€ a, & Vehvil€ ainen-Julkunen, 2006; P€ olkki, 2002). "
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    ABSTRACT: Involving parents in children's pain management is essential to achieve optimal outcomes. Parents need to be equipped with sufficient knowledge and information. Only a limited number of studies have explored nurses' provision of parental guidance regarding the use of nonpharmacologic methods in children's pain management. This study aimed to examine nurses' perceptions of providing preparatory information and nonpharmacologic methods to parents, and how their demographics and perceived knowledge adequacy of these methods influence this guidance. A descriptive correlational study using questionnaire surveys was conducted to collect data from a convenience sample of 134 registered nurses working in seven pediatric wards of two public hospitals in Singapore. Descriptive statistics, independent-samples t test, and multiple linear regression were used to analyze the data. Most nurses provided various types of cognitive information to parents related to their children's surgery, whereas information about children's feelings was less often provided. Most nurses provided guidance to parents on positioning, breathing technique, comforting/reassurance, helping with activities of daily living, relaxation, and creating a comfortable environment. Nurses' provision of parental guidance on preparatory information and nonpharmacologic methods was significantly different between subgroups of age, education, parent or not, and perceived knowledge adequacy of nonpharmacologic methods. Nurses' perceived knowledge adequacy was the main factor influencing their provision of parental guidance. More attention should be paid to nurses who are younger, have less working experience, and are not parents. There is a need to educate nurses about nonpharmacologic pain relief methods to optimize their provision of parental guidance.
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    • "Therefore, parental involvement is one of the crucial factors in achieving optimal pain management for children (Kankkunen, Vehvil€ ainen- Julkunen, Pietil€ a, & Halonen, 2003; Wright, Stewart, Finley, & Buffett-Jerrott, 2007). However, previous studies show that parents often lack information, instruction and knowledge in managing children's postoperative pain (Kristensson-Hallstrom, 2000; Lim et al., 2012), and parents' implementation of nonpharmacologic methods is limited to those that were familiar to them from everyday life (Kankkunen et al., 2003; Lim et al., 2012; Sng et al., 2013). Parents need more help from nurses concerning preparatory information and nonpharmacologic methods (He, P€ olkki, Pietil€ a, & Vehvil€ ainen-Julkunen, 2006; P€ olkki, 2002). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Involving parents in children's pain management is essential to achieve optimal outcomes. Parents need to be equipped with sufficient knowledge and information. Only a limited number of studies have explored nurses' provision of parental guidance regarding the use of nonpharmacologic methods in children's pain management. This study aimed to examine nurses' perceptions of providing preparatory information and nonpharmacologic methods to parents, and how their demographics and perceived knowledge adequacy of these methods influence this guidance. A descriptive correlational study using questionnaire surveys was conducted to collect data from a convenience sample of 134 registered nurses working in seven pediatric wards of two public hospitals in Singapore. Descriptive statistics, independent-samples t test, and multiple linear regression were used to analyze the data. Most nurses provided various types of cognitive information to parents related to their children's surgery, whereas information about children's feelings was less often provided. Most nurses provided guidance to parents on positioning, breathing technique, comforting/reassurance, helping with activities of daily living, relaxation, and creating a comfortable environment. Nurses' provision of parental guidance on preparatory information and nonpharmacologic methods was significantly different between subgroups of age, education, parent or not, and perceived knowledge adequacy of nonpharmacologic methods. Nurses' perceived knowledge adequacy was the main factor influencing their provision of parental guidance. More attention should be paid to nurses who are younger, have less working experience, and are not parents. There is a need to educate nurses about nonpharmacologic pain relief methods to optimize their provision of parental guidance.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
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