Pediatric Otolaryngology in the United States: Chevalier Jackson's Legacy for the 21st Century

ArticleinOtolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 146(1):5-7 · January 2012with18 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.02 · DOI: 10.1177/0194599811426678 · Source: PubMed
Abstract

Chevalier Jackson and his disciples in pediatric bronchology and esophagology strove to conquer the 3 great illnesses of the early 20th century: lye ingestion with esophageal cicatrix formation, foreign-body aspiration, and tuberculosis. Jackson's successes and legacy were based on teaching through the use of clinical drawings and his improvements in instrumentation, which have saved generations of children. Clinical specialization and meticulous teamwork protected children's airways from the ravages of diphtheria. Jackson observed the mechanics of respiratory pulmonary function and gained a better understanding of the causes of pulmonary wheezes. A recent biography, Swallow, tells of Jackson's life and his important contributions to the care of all children.