Article

Resistive vibration exercise during bed-rest reduces motor control changes in the lumbo-pelvic musculature

Charité Universitätsmedzin Berlin, Zentrum für Muskel- und Knochenforschung, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin, Germany.
Journal of electromyography and kinesiology: official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology (Impact Factor: 1.65). 02/2012; 22(1):21-30. DOI: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2011.09.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To understand the effects of a resistive vibration exercise (RVE) countermeasure on changes in lumbo-pelvic muscle motor control during prolonged bed-rest, 20 male subjects took part in the Berlin Bed-Rest Study (in 2003-2005) and were randomised to a RVE group or an inactive control group. Surface electromyographic signals recorded from five superficial lumbo-pelvic muscles during a repetitive knee movement task. The task, which required stabilisation of the lumbo-pelvic region, was performed at multiple movement speeds and at multiple time points during and after bed-rest. After excluding effects that could be attributed to increases in subcutaneous fat changes and improvements in movement skill, we found that the RVE intervention ameliorated the generalised increases in activity ratios between movement speeds (p⩽0.012), reductions in lumbo-pelvic extensor and flexor co-contraction (p=0.058) and increases in root-mean-square electromyographic amplitude (p=0.001) of the lumbar erector spinae muscles. Effects of RVE on preventing increases in amplitude-modulation (p=0.23) of the lumbar erector spinae muscles were not significant. Few significant changes in activation-timing were seen. The RVE intervention during bed-rest, with indirect loading of the spine during exercise, was capable of reducing some, but not all, motor control changes in the lumbo-pelvic musculature during and after bed-rest.

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