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This is an experimental study and it discusses the effectiveness of social support in managing academic stress among students. The purpose of this study is to understand the importance of social support in managing stress. Simple random sampling was assigned to a number of 120 students, equally divided into an experimental and a control group. Classes on social support as coping mechanisms were given to the experimental group only. The accumulated data were then analyzed, descriptive statistics were used to interpret and evaluate the prevalence of academic stress, and social support. Correlation analysis was employed in the examination of the relationship between stress and social support. The findings of this study indicate that there are significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in relation to stress and social support. Eventually, the experimental group proved to cope with academic stress better than the control group, and they were satisfied with their academic performance during the experimentation. Hence, it is highly advisable to encourage the students to use social support as coping mechanisms.
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... Secondly, this study found that social support only moderated the path between perceived stress and anxiety and depression. One possible explanation is that social support may intervene between a threatening event and a stress response by attenuating the stress appraisal (Baqutayan, 2011;Rollock and Lui, 2016). Frontline medical staff with higher levels of social support may be more likely to believe that others would provide the necessary resources to solve the problem when they encounter stress. ...
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The outbreak of COVID-19 epidemic has increased work demands for medical staff and has a certain impact on their mental health. The present study aimed to examine the role of perceived stress and social support in explaining the association between the occupational stressors and three mental health symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depression, and insomnia) of frontline medical staff. Five hundred twenty five frontline medical staff were investigated online after the outbreak of the COVID-19 (16 February, 2020–2 March, 2020) in China. The results found that the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia among frontline medical staff were 39.8, 29.9, and 37.9%, respectively. Occupational stressors were associated with anxiety, depression, and insomnia symptoms. Perceived stress significantly mediated this link. Social support moderated the second half of the indirect effect of occupational stressors on anxiety and depression symptoms. Under the epidemic situation of COVID-19, for frontline medical staff, high perceived stress and low social support may increase vulnerability for mental health symptoms triggered by occupational stressors. Thus, improving the social support and promoting the cognitive reappraisal of perceived stress may help to maintain mental health among medical staff.
... In addition, teaching students healthy stress management techniques has been shown to improve psychological well-being (Alborzkouh et al., 2015). Moreover, adaptive coping strategies, including social and emotional support, have been found to improve the mental well-being of students, and stress-reduction peer support groups and workshops on campus could be beneficial in reducing stress and improving the self-efficacy of students (Ruthig et al., 2009;Baqutayan, 2011;Bedewy and Gabriel, 2015;Freire et al., 2020;Green et al., 2021;Suresh et al., 2021). Other interventions that have been effective in improving the coping skills of college students include cognitivebehavioral therapy, mindfulness mediation, and online coping tools (Kang et al., 2009;Regehr et al., 2013;Molla Jafar et al., 2015;Phang et al., 2015;Houston et al., 2017;Yusufov et al., 2019;Freire et al., 2020). ...
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Academic stress may be the single most dominant stress factor that affects the mental well-being of college students. Some groups of students may experience more stress than others, and the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic could further complicate the stress response. We surveyed 843 college students and evaluated whether academic stress levels affected their mental health, and if so, whether there were specific vulnerable groups by gender, race/ethnicity, year of study, and reaction to the pandemic. Using a combination of scores from the Perception of Academic Stress Scale (PAS) and the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (SWEMWBS), we found a significant correlation between worse academic stress and poor mental well-being in all the students, who also reported an exacerbation of stress in response to the pandemic. In addition, SWEMWBS scores revealed the lowest mental health and highest academic stress in non-binary individuals, and the opposite trend was observed for both the measures in men. Furthermore, women and non-binary students reported higher academic stress than men, as indicated by PAS scores. The same pattern held as a reaction to COVID-19-related stress. PAS scores and responses to the pandemic varied by the year of study, but no obvious patterns emerged. These results indicate that academic stress in college is significantly correlated to psychological well-being in the students who responded to this survey. In addition, some groups of college students are more affected by stress than others, and additional resources and support should be provided to them.
... İşlevsel destek türünde ise bireye yapılan yardımın birey için ne kadar önemli olduğu, bu yardımın bireyin ihtiyacını ne oranda karşıladığı önemlidir (Yıldırım, 2004). Sosyal destek kaynakları bulanan bireylerin daha güçlü bağlandıkları ve daha az yalnızlık hissettikleri (Edwards, 2009), daha az stres belirtisi gösterdikleri (Baqutayan, 2011), kaygı düzeylerinin düşük olduğu (Perrier vd., 2010), daha az problem odaklı çözüm yöntemi kullandıkları (Calvete ve Connor-Smith, 2006), bağımlı olma risklerinin azaldığı (Ögel, 2012), özsaygı düzeylerinin yüksek olduğu (Colarossi ve Eccles, 2000), akademik başarılarının yüksek olduğu (Levitt vd., 1994;Yıldırım,1998) ve okula daha kolay uyum sağladıkları (Ladd, 1990;Mallinckrodt, 1998) yapılan araştırmalarla ortaya konulmuştur. ...
... One other factor that may affect the psychological impact of lockdown is the availability of social support. Several studies (Baqutayan, 2011;Çivitci, 2015) have observed that participants with better social support can cope more successfully with stressful events. Furthermore, in a study with chimpanzees (Wittig et al., 2016), it was found that social support, provided by interaction with bond partners, reduced stress hormone levels. ...
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... 42 This could be related to the collectivist nature of the Jordanian community, where social support is crucial and plays a protective role against stressful life events. 43 Also, we found that more than one-third of patients had low self-esteem. These findings are higher than earlier studies' results, in which one-third of patients with CVDs had low self-esteem. ...
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