Severe pre-eclampsia is associated with abnormal trace elements concentrations in maternal and fetal blood

    Abstract

    The study was aimed to compare trace elements concentrations in women with and without severe pre-eclampsia (PE).
    A prospective case-control study was conducted comparing 43 parturients with severe PE (who received magnesium sulfate [MgSO4]) and 80 healthy parturients and their newborns, matched for gestational age and mode of delivery. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used for the determination of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), selenium (Se) and magnesium (Mg) levels in maternal as well as arterial and venous umbilical cord serum.
    Zn levels (µg/L) were significantly higher in fetal arterial and venous blood of the PE group (947.3 ± 42.5 vs. 543.1 ± 226, 911.1 ± 220.2 vs. 422.4 ± 145, p < 0.001; respectively). Se levels (µg/L) were significantly lower in maternal and fetal arterial and venous cord blood of the PE group (98.6 ± 24.2, 110.7 ± 19.4, 82 ± 17.8 vs. 111.6 ± 17.6, 82.1 ± 17.4 vs. 107.1 ± 25.7, p < 0.001; respectively). Cu levels (µg/L) were significantly lower in fetal arterial and venous cord blood (581.6 ± 367.4 vs. 949 ± 788.8, p = 0.022, 608.3 ± 418.1 vs. 866.9 ± 812.6, p = 0.001 respectively) but higher in maternal blood (2264.6 ± 751.7 vs. 1048 ± 851.1, p < 0.001). These differences remained significant while controlling for the mode of delivery. Mg levels were significantly higher in the PE group as compared with the control group.
    Severe PE is associated with abnormal concentrations of Zn, Cu and Se. Therefore, trace elements may have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of severe PE.