Article

Relation Between Clinical Depression Risk and Physical Activity and Time Spent Watching Television in Older Women: A 10-Year Prospective Follow-up Study

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
American journal of epidemiology (Impact Factor: 5.23). 11/2011; 174(9):1017-27. DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwr218
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although physical activity (PA) has been inversely associated with depressive symptoms, it is not clear whether regular PA and television watching are associated with clinical depression risk. The authors conducted a prospective analysis involving 49,821 US women from the Nurses' Health Study who were free from depressive symptoms at baseline (1996). Information on PA was obtained from validated questionnaires completed in 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2000; analyses were conducted using the cumulative average of PA (minutes/day) with a 2-year latency period applied. Participants were asked about television-watching habits in 1992. Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for multiple risk factors were used to estimate relative risks of clinical depression (self-reported physician-diagnosed depression or use of antidepressants). During 10 years of follow-up (1996-2006), 6,505 incident cases of depression were documented. Higher levels of PA were associated with lower depression risk. The multivariate relative risk comparing the highest level of PA (≥ 90 minutes/day) with the lowest (<10 minutes/day) was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 0.92; P(trend) < 0.001). In contrast, the risk of depression increased with increasing television-watching time. The multivariate relative risk comparing women who spent 21 hours/week or more watching television with those who spent 0-1 hour/week was 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.27; P(trend) = 0.01). Analyses simultaneously considering PA and television watching suggested that both contributed independently to depression risk.

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    • "A recent review on the prevalence of sitting behaviour in people of 60þ years indicated that over 55% referred watching more than 2 h of TV daily. However, while the previously cited studies have mostly focussed on adults, little has been published on the effects of TV viewing on people over 65 years old (Kikuchi et al., 2013; Lucas et al., 2011). A recent review on the prevalence of sitting behaviour in of people of 60þ years indicated that over 55% referred watching more than 2 h of TV daily (Harvey, Chastin, & Skelton, 2013). "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Time spent watching TV by Europeans has been calculated to be 22.1 h per week on average and it has shown to be correlated with a series of physical and mental problems in adults. Very little research is available in population over 65. This study aimed at evaluating the association between TV viewing and mental disorders and cognitive performance, taking into account the general physical activity level and socio-demographic characteristics in Europe. Methods Within the MentDis-ICF65+ study, a subsample of 1383 subjects aged 65-84 years were assessed by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI65+) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) for physical activity evaluation. Time spent in watching TV was assessed through a self report instrument. Results Forty-three per cent of the total sample watched TV for 5-7 days a week for 2 or more hours every day. Females, people who lived alone, older subjects and those with lower education significantly watched TV for a longer time. Stepwise multiple regression showed statistically significant inverse correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination scores and TV viewing time (p < 0.001). Apart from a negative association with Major Depressive Disorder, no particular associations were found between TV viewing and psychopathological diagnoses. Conclusions Given the relationship of time spending watching TV with cognitive impairment, awareness should be raised about the possible negative effects of TV viewing on the elderly and programs to reduce TV viewing time should be set up.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Mental Health and Physical Activity
    • "Deleger, Roberts, & Kaplan, 2002), even after adjustment for possible confounders including smoking or alcohol consumption. Specifically, a 10-year prospective study including older women showed that walking for more than 40 minutes per day decreased the risk of MDD by 17% (Lucas et al., 2011). In this perspective, obtaining further evidence of the effectiveness of health prevention strategies on inactive post-menopausal women seems necessary. "

    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · European geriatric medicine
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    • "Deleger, Roberts, & Kaplan, 2002), even after adjustment for possible confounders including smoking or alcohol consumption. Specifically, a 10-year prospective study including older women showed that walking for more than 40 minutes per day decreased the risk of MDD by 17% (Lucas et al., 2011). In this perspective, obtaining further evidence of the effectiveness of health prevention strategies on inactive post-menopausal women seems necessary. "
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. Physical inactivity and advanced age are associated with risk of depressive disorders. Physical activity can reduce depressive symptoms in older subjects with depressive disorders. We investigated whether a walking intervention program may decrease the occurrence of depressive symptoms in inactive postmenopausal women without depression. Method. A total of 121 participants aged 57-75 years were randomly assigned to a 6-month moderate intensity walking intervention (3 times a week, 40 minutes per session, supervised and home-based) or to a control group (waiting list). Inactivity was assessed using the Physical Activity Questionnaire for the Elderly. Depression levels were measured pre- and post-intervention with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Several baseline measures were considered as possible predictors of post-intervention BDI score. Results. Participants in the walking intervention showed a significant decrease in depression compared with controls. Baseline cognitive-BDI subscore, subjective health status, body mass index and adherence were post-intervention BDI score predictors. Conclusion. A 6-month, 3-session/week, moderate intensity walking intervention with a minimal 50% adherence rate reduces depression in postmenopausal women at risk for depression due to physical inactivity. This type of walking intervention could be considered as a widely accessible prevention strategy to prevent depressive symptoms in postmenopausal women at risk of depression.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Aging and Mental Health
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