Article

Factors involved in the persistence of stress urinary incontinence from pregnancy to 2 years post partum

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Donostia Hospital, San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa, Spain.
International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (Impact Factor: 1.54). 09/2011; 115(3):256-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijgo.2011.07.024
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To identify factors involved in the persistence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from pregnancy to 2 years post partum.
In a longitudinal study at Donostia Hospital, San Sebastián, Spain, 458 primigravid women were recruited from April to October 2007. SUI was diagnosed via the 2002 International Continence Society definition. Severity was assessed via the Incontinence Severity Index, and impact on quality of life via the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. Means (Student t test and analysis of variance) and percentages (χ(2) and Fisher exact tests) were compared, and multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with variables that were significant or close to significant in a univariate analysis (P<0.2).
Among 272 eligible women attending follow-up at 2 years post partum, 26 (9.5%) women reported persistent SUI since pregnancy. Incontinence severity was slight or moderate in most cases and the impact on quality of life was low. A higher body mass index (BMI) in pregnant women at term was the only factor found to be associated with persistent SUI (odds ratio 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.32).
Higher BMI in pregnant women at term was an independent risk factor for the persistence of SUI from pregnancy to 2 years post partum.

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    • "Other previously published data also found that women with higher body mass index (BMI) have a higher chance of developing urinary incontinence, not only in non-pregnant women but also during pregnancy[3,4,11]. Higher BMI in pregnant women at term was also the only factor found to be associated with persistent stress incontinence later[26]. However in our study, body mass index (BMI) has not been shown to be significantly associated with urinary incontinence, despite using a lower cut off point based on recommendation by World Health Organisation (WHO) for Asian women[27]. This result was quite surprising and we do not have a clear explanation for this. "
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