Article

Cognitive and Behavioral Consequences of Impaired Immunoregulation in Aging

Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (Impact Factor: 4.11). 09/2011; 7(1):7-23. DOI: 10.1007/s11481-011-9313-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

A hallmark of the aged immune system is impaired immunoregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system in the periphery and also in the central nervous system (CNS). Impaired immunoregulation may predispose older individuals to an increased frequency of peripheral infections with concomitant cognitive and behavioral complications. Thus, normal aging is hypothesized to alter the highly coordinated interactions between the immune system and the brain. In support of this notion, mounting evidence in rodent models indicate that the increased inflammatory status of the brain is associated with increased reactivity of microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS. Understanding how immunity is affected with age is important because CNS immune cells play an integral role in propagating inflammatory signals that are initiated in the periphery. Increased reactivity of microglia sets the stage for an exaggerated inflammatory cytokine response following activation of the peripheral innate immune system that is paralleled by prolonged sickness, depressive-like complications and cognitive impairment. Moreover, amplified neuroinflammation negatively affects several aspects of neural plasticity (e.g., neurogenesis, long-term potentiation, and dendritic morphology) that can contribute to the severity of neurological complications. The purpose of this review is to discuss several key peripheral and central immune changes that impair the coordinated response between the immune system and the brain and result in behavioral and cognitive deficits.

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Available from: Jonathan Godbout, May 15, 2015