Article

The Additive Risk Model for Estimation of Effect of Haplotype Match in BMT Studies

Department of Biostatistics, University of Copenhagen.
Scandinavian Journal of Statistics (Impact Factor: 0.87). 09/2011; 38(3):409-423. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9469.2010.00720.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

In this paper we consider a problem from bone marrow transplant (BMT) studies where there is interest on assessing the effect of haplotype match for donor and patient on the overall survival. The BMT study we consider is based on donors and patients that are genotype matched, and this therefore leads to a missing data problem. We show how Aalen's additive risk model can be applied in this setting with the benefit that the time-varying haplo-match effect can be easily studied. This problem has not been considered before, and the standard approach where one would use the EM-algorithm cannot be applied for this model because the likelihood is hard to evaluate without additional assumptions. We suggest an approach based on multivariate estimating equations that are solved using a recursive structure. This approach leads to an estimator where the large sample properties can be developed using product-integration theory. Small sample properties are investigated using simulations in a setting that mimics the motivating haplo-match problem.

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