Article

Urinary glycosaminoglycans in horse osteoarthritis. Effects of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine

Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, USP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
Research in Veterinary Science (Impact Factor: 1.41). 09/2011; 93(1):88-96. DOI: 10.1016/j.rvsc.2011.08.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Our objectives were to characterize the urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in horse osteoarthritis, and to investigate the effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and glucosamine (GlcN) upon the disease. Urinary GAGs were measured in 47 athletic horses, 20 healthy and 27 with osteoarthritis. The effects of CS and GlcN were investigated in mild osteoarthritis. In comparison to normal, urinary GAGs were increased in osteoarthritis, including mild osteoarthritis affecting only one joint. Treatment with CS+GlcN led to a long lasting increase in the urinary CS and keratan sulfate (KS), and significant improvement in flexion test of tarsocrural and metacarpophalangeal joints was observed. In conclusion, urinary CS and KS seems to reflect the turnover rates of cartilage matrix proteoglycans, and the measurement of these compounds could provide objective means of evaluating and monitoring joint diseases.

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Available from: Raquel Y A Baccarin, Apr 22, 2015
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    • "Keratan sulfate was detected in the samples by immunoblotting probed with MST1, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes keratan sulfate both as free chains and as proteoglycans (Alves et al., 1994; Baccarin et al., 2012; Pereira, Aguiar, Hagiwara, & Michelacci, 2004). After agarose gel electrophoresis, the glycosaminoglycans were transferred to nitrocellulose and Zeta-Probe nylon membranes . "

    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2015
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    • "Keratan sulfate was detected in the samples by immunoblotting probed with MST1, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes keratan sulfate both as free chains and as proteoglycans (Alves et al., 1994; Baccarin et al., 2012; Pereira, Aguiar, Hagiwara, & Michelacci, 2004). After agarose gel electrophoresis, the glycosaminoglycans were transferred to nitrocellulose and Zeta-Probe nylon membranes . "
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to characterize 16 pharmaceutical grade chondroitin sulfate (CS) samples, concerning the structure and presence of contaminants, in comparison to USP and analytical grade CS. Agarose gel electrophoresis has shown that only 5 samples were >90% CS, while 11 contained less than 15% CS. FACE (fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis) revealed that maltodextrin was the main contaminant in nine of them, and lactose in two. Raman spectroscopy corroborated these results. Concerning the structure of the CS present in the five CS-rich samples, the ratios 4-sulfated:6-sulfated disaccharides varied from 0.9 to 1.7, and their modal molecular weight was 20-29 kDa. Also, they were all contaminated by small amounts of keratan sulfate (<1%). In conclusion, our findings indicate that the composition of CS preparations not always corresponds to the manufacturers' descriptions, and indicate that further characterization should be required for the registry and license of pharmaceutical grade CS.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Carbohydrate Polymers
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    • "This disease is mainly characterized by primary degeneration of the articular cartilage and may affect one or several joints at the same time, affecting both young and adult animals (Weaver 1997). DJD is highly prevalent in humans (Brooks 2002) and in animals, especially in dogs (Biasi et al. 2005) and horses (Frisbie et al. 2008, Baccarin et al. 2012). DJD is also commonly reported in cattle (Persson et al. 2007, Heinola et al. 2013), but to date, descriptions of DJD in buffaloes and mini cattle have not been found in the literature. "
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    ABSTRACT: A retrospective study of the epidemiological and clinic-pathological aspects of cattle and buffaloes with degenerative joint disease (DJD) was conducted in the state of Pará, Brazil. From 1999 to 2014, eleven cattle and 24 buffaloes were evaluated. All the treated animals with suspected DJD underwent a clinical examination of the musculoskeletal system. In seven cattle and eight buffaloes with clinical signs of the disease postmortem examination was performed. The common clinical signs observed in both species were chronic lameness, stiff gait, postural changes, audible crackles in the affected limb, prolonged recumbency, difficulty in getting up and progressive weight loss. The lesions observed at necropsy were: irregular articular surfaces, erosion of the articular cartilage and the underlying bone tissue, and proliferation of the periarticular bone tissue with formation of osteophytes. The most affected joints in cattle and buffaloes wereof the hind limb. In buffaloes, the main predisposing factor to the onset of DJD was phosphorus deficiency. In cattle, defects of the anatomical conformation of the hind limbs, chronic trauma due to the activities performed, such as semen collection, and advanced age possibly contributed to the emergence of the disease.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira
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