Article

Water Doesn't Run Uphill (by Itself)⁎

University of California, San Francisco, Echocardiography Laboratory, San Francisco, California.
JACC. Cardiovascular imaging (Impact Factor: 7.19). 09/2011; 4(9):955-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2011.08.005
Source: PubMed

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Available from: Nelson B Schiller, Aug 21, 2014
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