Risk factors and microbial isolates of puerperal sepsis at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, North-eastern Nigeria

ArticleinArchives of Gynecology 285(4):913-7 · September 2011with118 Reads
Impact Factor: 1.36 · DOI: 10.1007/s00404-011-2078-4 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    To determine the risk factors and microbial isolates of puerperal sepsis.
    A 12 year retrospective review of patients with puerperal sepsis from January 1999 to December 2010 at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) was conducted. Information on socio-demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, place and mode of delivery and microorganism isolated from the endocervical swabs was collected and analysed. Comparison was also made with the other women that delivered during the period of study.
    The incidence of puerperal sepsis was 0.78%. Majority (88.0%) of the patients were unbooked, 59.1% delivered at home and 23.1% delivered in other peripheral hospitals. The major risk factors for developing puerperal sepsis were unbooked status, home delivery, perineal trauma, caesarean section (C/S) and maternal age <24 years with OR of 56.60, 39.25, 8.52, 4.99 and 1.32, respectively. The commonest microorganism isolated were Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli seen in 35.4 and 20.9%, respectively. Streptococcus species was found in 6.9%, while 20.3% had polymicrobials isolated.
    Puerperal sepsis continues to present a significant risk of maternal mortality in developing countries. The risk factors are unbooked women, home delivery, perineal trauma, caesarean section and maternal age <24 years. S. aureus and E. coli are the commonest isolated organisms. There is a need to enlighten the populace on the need for booking, skilled attendant at delivery and hospital delivery under aseptic conditions.