Article

Arbuscular mycorrhizas enhance nutrient uptake in different wheat genotypes at high salinity levels under field and greenhouse conditions. Com Rend Biol

Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.
Comptes rendus biologies (Impact Factor: 0.98). 07/2011; 334(7):564-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.crvi.2011.05.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Since most experiments regarding the symbiosis between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and their host plants under salinity stress have been performed only under greenhouse conditions, this research work was also conducted under field conditions. The effects of three AM species including Glomus mosseae, G. etunicatum and G. intraradices on the nutrient uptake of different wheat cultivars (including Roshan, Kavir and Tabasi) under field and greenhouse (including Chamran and Line 9) conditions were determined. At field harvest, the concentrations of N, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, and Mn, and at greenhouse harvest, plant growth, root colonization and concentrations of different nutrients including N, K, P, Ca, Mg, Mn, Cu, Fe, Zn, Na and Cl were determined. The effects of wheat cultivars on the concentrations of N, Ca, and Mn, and of all nutrients were significant at field and greenhouse conditions, respectively. In both experiments, AM fungi significantly enhanced the concentrations of all nutrients including N, K, P, Ca, Mg, Mn, Cu, Fe, Zn, Na and Cl. The synergistic and enhancing effects of co-inoculation of AM species on plant growth and the inhibiting effect of AM species on Na(+) rather than on Cl(-) uptake under salinity are also among the important findings of this research work.

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    • "Present in the soils of most ecosystems, AM fungi form symbiotic associations with the roots of over 80% of the terrestrial plant species (Smith and Read, 2008). Through its mycelium network, mycorrhizal symbiosis improves plant water and nutrient uptake especially phosphorus (Schreiner, 2007; Mardukhi et al., 2011; Hern andez-Ortega et al., 2012; Labidi et al., 2012). Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi also play a role in increasing plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as pollutants (Leyval et al., 2002; Alarc on et al., 2006; Verdin et al., 2006; Debiane et al., 2009), and biotic stresses such as plant pathogens (Dalp e, 2005; Akhtar and Siddiqui, 2008). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    • "Present in the soils of most ecosystems, AM fungi form symbiotic associations with the roots of over 80% of the terrestrial plant species (Smith and Read, 2008). Through its mycelium network, mycorrhizal symbiosis improves plant water and nutrient uptake especially phosphorus (Schreiner, 2007; Mardukhi et al., 2011; Hern andez-Ortega et al., 2012; Labidi et al., 2012). Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi also play a role in increasing plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as pollutants (Leyval et al., 2002; Alarc on et al., 2006; Verdin et al., 2006; Debiane et al., 2009), and biotic stresses such as plant pathogens (Dalp e, 2005; Akhtar and Siddiqui, 2008). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
  • Source
    • "Present in the soils of most ecosystems, AM fungi form symbiotic associations with the roots of over 80% of the terrestrial plant species (Smith and Read, 2008). Through its mycelium network, mycorrhizal symbiosis improves plant water and nutrient uptake especially phosphorus (Schreiner, 2007; Mardukhi et al., 2011; Hern andez-Ortega et al., 2012; Labidi et al., 2012). Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi also play a role in increasing plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as pollutants (Leyval et al., 2002; Alarc on et al., 2006; Verdin et al., 2006; Debiane et al., 2009), and biotic stresses such as plant pathogens (Dalp e, 2005; Akhtar and Siddiqui, 2008). "
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    ABSTRACT: The present work examined the impact of increasing diesel concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 1%) on the development of both partners of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: Rhizophagus irregularis and chicory roots (Cichorium intybus L.) grown in vitro. Our findings showed that although the different diesel concentrations tested (0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5%) affect negatively the main stages of R. irregularis development (germination, germinative hyphal elongation, root colonization rate, extraradical hyphae development, sporulation) and the chicory root growth, they are not completely inhibited, except at 1%. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus was able to fulfil its life cycle in the presence of the pollutant. No increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) production - a biomarker of lipid peroxidation - was detected in dieselexposed mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal roots, suggesting that the negative effect of diesel on the chicory roots growth could not result from the alteration of membrane lipids. Moreover, our results pointed out that the diesel toxic effect on the growth of chicory roots is less noticeable when they are mycorrhized, indicating a protective effect of mycorrhization. This protection could be related to induction of antioxidant enzyme peroxidase activity, but not to superoxide dismutase activity. Taken together, our results demonstrated the toxic effect of diesel on the mycorrhizal symbiosis and suggest a probable involvement of the mycorrhizal fungus in the protection of chicory roots against oxidative stress induced by diesel.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation
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