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Petersen N and Gatenholm P: ‘Bacterial cellulose-based materials and medical devices: current state and perspectives’, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., , 91

University of Virginia School of Medicine, PO Box 800233, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0233, USA.
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology (Impact Factor: 3.34). 09/2011; 91(5):1277-86. DOI: 10.1007/s00253-011-3432-y
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a unique and promising material for use as implants and scaffolds in tissue engineering. It is composed of a pure cellulose nanofiber mesh spun by bacteria. It is remarkable for its strength and its ability to be engineered structurally and chemically at nano-, micro-, and macroscales. Its high water content and purity make the material biocompatible for multiple medical applications. Its biocompatibility, mechanical strength, chemical and morphologic controllability make it a natural choice for use in the body in biomedical devices with broader application than has yet been utilized. This paper reviews the current state of understanding of bacterial cellulose, known methods for controlling its physical and chemical structure (e.g., porosity, fiber alignment, etc.), biomedical applications for which it is currently being used, or investigated for use, challenges yet to be overcome, and future possibilities for BC.

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    • "al., 2015; Almeida et al., 2014; Abeer et. al., 2014; Keshk, 2014; Petersen and Gatenholm, 2011). Some of BC's properties which recommend this biopolymer in medical and pharmaceutical applications are: biocompatibility, biodegradability, a high water holding capacity, outstanding mechanical properties, and a fibrous nano-structure which allows it to have also controlled-release functionality (Torres et al., 2012; Silvestre et al., 2014). "
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    ABSTRACT: Composite films of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and bacterial cellulose (NaCMC-BC) cross-linked with citric acid (CA) were prepared by solution casting method. Ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) has been used to study the mechanism of drug release from composite films. Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and proved that the BC content influences the aspect of the films. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed specific peaks in IR spectra of composite films which sustain that NaCMC was cross-linked with CA. Starting from swelling observations, the release kinetic of IbuNa was described using a model which neglects the volume expansion due to polymer swelling and which considers non-linear diffusion coefficients for drug and solvent. The IbuNa release is also influenced by BC content, the drug release rate was decreasing with the increase of BC content.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International Journal of Pharmaceutics
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    • "al., 2015; Almeida et al., 2014; Abeer et. al., 2014; Keshk, 2014; Petersen and Gatenholm, 2011). Some of BC's properties which recommend this biopolymer in medical and pharmaceutical applications are: biocompatibility, biodegradability, a high water holding capacity, outstanding mechanical properties, and a fibrous nano-structure which allows it to have also controlled-release functionality (Torres et al., 2012; Silvestre et al., 2014). "

    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Pharmaceutics
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    • "artificial heart valves or menisci), biocompatible, non-biodegradable materials may be acceptable whereas for other applications (e.g. artificial bone grafts), the bioresorbable material enabling tissue regeneration is preferable [36]. In terms of biodegradation, cellulose may be considered as nonbiodegradable in vivo or, at best, slowly degradable, due to the lack of cellulase enzymes in animals. "
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    ABSTRACT: Nanocellulose, a unique and promising natural material extracted from native cellulose, has gained much attention for its use as biomedical material, because of its remarkable physical properties, special surface chemistry and excellent biological properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability and low toxicity). Three different types of nanocellulose, viz. cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and bacterial cellulose (BC), are introduced and compared in terms of production, properties and biomedical applications in this article. The advancement of nanocellulose-based biomedical materials is summarized and discussed on the analysis of latest studies (especially reports from the past five years). Selected studies with significant findings are emphasized, and focused topics for nanocellulose in biomedicine research in this article include the discussion at the level of molecule (e.g. tissue bioscaffolds for cellular culture; drug excipient and drug delivery; and immobilization and recognition of enzyme/protein) as well as at the level of macroscopic biomaterials (e.g. blood vessel and soft tissue substitutes; skin and bone tissue repair materials; and antimicrobial materials). Functional modification of nanocellulose will determine the potential biomedical application for nanocellulose, which is also introduced as a separated section in the article. Finally, future perspectives and possible research points are proposed in Section 5. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · European Polymer Journal
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