Physician Advice on Exercise and Diet in a US Sample of Obese Mexican-American Adults

ArticleinAmerican journal of health promotion: AJHP 25(6):402-9 · July 2011with4 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.37 · DOI: 10.4278/ajhp.090918-QUAN-305 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    To document the prevalence of obese Mexican-Americans never advised by health professionals regarding exercise and diet, and to determine risk factors for no advice.
    Data came from 1787 obese Mexican-American adults (body mass index ≥30; age ≥18 years) in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The survey included self-reported receipt of health care provider advice on exercise and diet as well as sociodemographic, health-related, and provider-related factors. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed separately for advice regarding exercise and advice regarding diet.
    Overall, 45% of respondents reported that they had never received advice from a doctor or health care professional to exercise more, and 52% reported that they have received advice to eat fewer higher-fat/high-cholesterol foods. Men, nonmarried respondents, lower-educated respondents, those who preferred to speak Spanish at home, and those without comorbid chronic conditions were less likely to receive advice.
    Results suggest that obese Mexican-Americans are insufficiently advised by health care providers regarding exercise and diet. Given the seriousness of obesity-related health risks and the increasing prevalence of overweight status and obesity among Mexican-Americans, it is vital that providers are involved in finding ways to effectively educate and/or treat overweight patients.