The Impact of Landfills on Residential Property Values

Article (PDF Available)inJournal of Real Estate Research 7(3):297-314 · January 1992with 1,472 Reads
Source: RePEc
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Abstract
The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of five municipal landfills on residential property values in a major metropolitan area (Cleveland, Ohio). The study concludes that landfills will likely have an adverse impact upon housing values when the landfill is located within several blocks of an expensive housing area. The negative impact is between 5.5%-7.3% of market value depending upon the actual distance from the landfill. For less expensive, older areas the landfill effect is considerably less pronounced, ranging from 3%-4% of market value, and essentially nonexistent for predominantly rural areas.
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