Article

Videbech P, Ravnkilde B. Hippocampal volume and depression: a meta-analysis of MRI studies. Am J Psychiatry 161: 1957-1966

Institute for Basic Psychiatric Research, Department of Biological Psychiatry, Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8240 Risskov, Denmark.
American Journal of Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 12.3). 11/2004; 161(11):1957-66. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.161.11.1957
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Several studies have found reduced hippocampal volume in patients with unipolar depression, but discrepancies exist. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of volumetric studies of the hippocampus in patients with mood disorders.
Studies of hippocampal volume in unipolar and bipolar patients were identified. A meta-analysis of the 12 studies of unipolar depression fulfilling specific criteria was performed. The sample comprised 351 patients and 279 healthy subjects.
The studies were highly heterogeneous regarding age and gender distribution, age at onset of the disorder, average number of episodes, and responsiveness to treatment, but the pooled effect size of depression was significant in both hemispheres for the unipolar patients. The weighted average showed a reduction of hippocampal volume of 8% on the left side and 10% on the right side. The causes of the heterogeneity were analyzed, and a meta-regression showed that the total number of depressive episodes was significantly correlated to right but not left hippocampal volume reduction.
Hippocampal volume is reduced in patients with unipolar depression, maybe as a consequence of repeated periods of major depressive disorder. Bipolar patients did not seem to show a reduction in hippocampal volume, but this has been much less investigated.

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    • "Longer illness duration associates with a general decrease in the volume of cerebral grey matter. Two meta-analyses highlighted the association of recurrent episode frequency with hippocampal volume in recurrently depressed patients [72] [73], with the level of hippocampal volume loss correlating with neurocognitive losses. Neuroprogression in depression is at least partly driven by increased O&NS [62] and CMI, with a role for IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-ү and IL-2, as well as TRYCATs, such as the excitotoxic quinolinic acid (QUIN) [62] [74], as detailed below. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
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    • "Second, although impairment in hippocampal neurogenesis has been considered a major pathophysiological feature of MDD, the results regarding hippocampal volumes in MDD are inconsistent. As described previously, hippocampal volume may decrease as exposure to stress increases and as the number of depressive episodes increases because those processes result in neuronal loss and hippocampus atrophy (Lee et al., 2002a; Videbech and Ravnkilde, 2004). Several researchers have suggested that hippocampal volume is already decreased in patients with a high risk of depression , suggesting that small hippocampal volume is a trait-marker for depression (Baare et al., 2010; Chen et al., 2010). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2015
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    • "Second, although impairment in hippocampal neurogenesis has been considered a major pathophysiological feature of MDD, the results regarding hippocampal volumes in MDD are inconsistent. As described previously, hippocampal volume may decrease as exposure to stress increases and as the number of depressive episodes increases because those processes result in neuronal loss and hippocampus atrophy (Lee et al., 2002a; Videbech and Ravnkilde, 2004). Several researchers have suggested that hippocampal volume is already decreased in patients with a high risk of depression , suggesting that small hippocampal volume is a trait-marker for depression (Baare et al., 2010; Chen et al., 2010). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2015
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