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    • "Clonidine itself should not be discontinued quickly due to the risk of rebound hypertension, and a gradual weaning plan should be in place prior to patient discharge from the ICU.78 The need for this planning is highlighted by the fact that, in some ICU cohorts, 85% of patients discharged from the hospital had potentially inappropriate medications on their discharge list, with 50% of these initially being prescribed in the ICU.79 "
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    ABSTRACT: Critically ill patients are routinely provided analgesia and sedation to prevent pain and anxiety, permit invasive procedures, reduce stress and oxygen consumption, and improve synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Regional preferences, patient history, institutional bias, and individual patient and practitioner variability, however, create a wide discrepancy in the approach to sedation of critically ill patients. Untreated pain and agitation increase the sympathetic stress response, potentially leading to negative acute and long-term consequences. Oversedation, however, occurs commonly and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including longer time on mechanical ventilation, prolonged stay in the intensive care unit, and increased brain dysfunction (delirium and coma). Modifying sedation delivery by incorporating analgesia and sedation protocols, targeted arousal goals, daily interruption of sedation, linked spontaneous awakening and breathing trials, and early mobilization of patients have all been associated with improvements in patient outcomes and should be incorporated into the clinical management of critically ill patients. To improve outcomes, including time on mechanical ventilation and development of acute brain dysfunction, conventional sedation paradigms should be altered by providing necessary analgesia, incorporating propofol or dexmedetomidine to reach arousal targets, and reducing benzodiazepine exposure.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Clinical Pharmacology: Advances and Applications
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    ABSTRACT: The medication use process is a varied and complex progression of steps that begin with prescribing from a health care provider to communicating orders to a nurse or pharmacist, dispensing by a pharmacist, and administering either by a patient's caregiver or the patient (Institute of Medicine 1999; Page et al. 2010).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the prevalence of unplanned hospitalizations caused by adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in older veterans and to examine the association between this outcome and polypharmacy after controlling for comorbidities and other patient characteristics. Retrospective cohort. Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Six hundred seventy-eight randomly selected unplanned hospitalizations of older (aged ≥ 65) veterans between October 1, 2003, and September 30, 2006. Naranjo ADR algorithm, ADR preventability, and polypharmacy (0-4, 5-8, and ≥9 scheduled medications). Seventy ADRs involving 113 drugs were found in 68 (10%) hospitalizations of older veterans, of which 25 (36.8%) were preventable. Extrapolating to the population of more than 2.4 million older veterans receiving care during the study period, 8,000 hospitalizations may have been unnecessary. The most common ADRs that occurred were bradycardia (n = 6; beta-blockers, digoxin), hypoglycemia (n = 6; sulfonylureas, insulin), falls (n = 6; antidepressants, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), and mental status changes (n = 6; anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines). Overall, 44.8% of veterans took nine or more outpatient medications and 35.4% took five to eight. Using multivariable logistic regression and controlling for demographic, health-status, and access-to-care variables, polypharmacy (≥9 and 5-8) was associated with greater risk of ADR-related hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.43-10.61 and AOR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.03-7.85, respectively). ADRs, determined using a validated causality algorithm, are a common cause of unplanned hospitalization in older veterans, are frequently preventable, and are associated with polypharmacy.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
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