Article

Inoculation of Ni-Resistant Plant Growth Promoting Bacterium Psychrobacter sp. Strain SRS8 for the Improvement of Nickel Phytoextraction by Energy Crops

Centre for Functional Ecology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
International Journal of Phytoremediation (Impact Factor: 1.74). 02/2011; 13(2):126-39. DOI: 10.1080/15226511003671403
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to elucidate effects of inoculating plant growth-promoting bacterium Psychrobacter sp. SRS8 on the growth and phytoextraction potential of energy crops Ricinus communis and Helianthus annuus in artificially Ni contaminated soils. The toxicity symptom in plants under Ni stress expressed as chlorophyll, protein content, growth inhibition, and Fe, P concentrations were studied, and the possible relationship among them were also discussed. The PGPB SRS8 was found capable of stimulating plant growth and Ni accumulation in both plant species. Further, the stimulation effect on plant biomass, chlorophyll, and protein content was concomitant with increased Fe and P assimilation from soil to plants. Further, the induction of catalase and peroxidase activities was also involved in the ability of SRS8 to increase the tolerance in both plant species under Ni stress. The findings suggest that strain SRS8 play an important role in promoting the growth and phytoextraction efficiency of R. communis and H. annuus, which may be used for remediation of metal contaminated sites.

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Available from: Ying Ma, Feb 25, 2014
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    • "Pseudomonas sp. PsM6 or P. jessenii PjM15 (Rajkumar and Freitas, 2008), PGPB SRS8 (Ma et al., 2011), PGPRs (Romeiro et al., 2006) increased the shoot and root biomass, reduces the toxicity of the metal for plants and facilitate its mobilization from soil when incorporated as amendment in soil with cultivation of R. communis. Adhikari and Kumar (2012) have reported that roots of Ni treated R. communis show decreased number of cells in the cortex region. "
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    ABSTRACT: Phytoremediation is an age old technology. Recently, it has emerged as one of the most accepted, economical, eco-friendly and esthetically important strategy adopted for removal of toxic metals from the contaminated sites. However, it is observed that its application suffers from several imperfections. Edible crops with low biomass and plants having low metal extracting ability have been studied extensively for their use to extract heavy metals. It is found that most of the edible crops are low biomass producing plant with shorter lifespan and sensitive to most of the abiotic and biotic stresses. Several non-edible plants have also been studied for their metal extraction potential. Ricinus communis is a non-edible emerging phytoremediator which is a robust and industrially important oil yielding multipurpose shrub of wild as well as cultivable nature. The application of R. communis for phytoremediation purpose in place of edible as well as non-edible stress sensitive crops/herbs may become a good alternative for the remediation of contaminated land. Its other important uses are biodiesel production, medicinal products, societal development, employment generation to the local peoples, carbon sequestration, reduction in green house gases (GHG), etc. It also increases the fertility of the soil and reduces soil erosion. R. communis has been found to possess excellent ability to extract majority of toxic metals like Cd, Pb, Ni, As, Cu, etc. as well as some organic contaminants like pesticides.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Ecological Engineering
    • "Pseudomonas sp. PsM6 or P. jessenii PjM15 (Rajkumar and Freitas, 2008), PGPB SRS8 (Ma et al., 2011), PGPRs (Romeiro et al., 2006) increased the shoot and root biomass, reduces the toxicity of the metal for plants and facilitate its mobilization from soil when incorporated as amendment in soil with cultivation of R. communis. Adhikari and Kumar (2012) have reported that roots of Ni treated R. communis show decreased number of cells in the cortex region. "
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    ABSTRACT: Heavy metal pollution of soil is a global environmental problem and therefore its remediation is of paramount importance. Cadmium (Cd) is a potential toxicant to living organisms and even at very low concentrations. This study was aimed to assess the effectiveness of Ricinus communis for remediation of Cd contaminated soils. For this, growth and biomass of R. communis and Cd accumulation, translocation and partitioning in different plant parts were investigated after 8 months of plant growth in Cd contaminated soil (17.50 mg Cd kg(-1) soil). Eight months old plants stabilized 51 % Cd in its roots and rest of the metal was transferred to the stem and leaves. There were no significant differences in growth, biomass and yield between control and Cd treated plants, except fresh weight of shoots. The seed yield per plant was reduced only by 5 % of Cd contaminated plants than control. The amount of Cd translocated to the castor seeds was nominal i.e. 0.007 µg Cd g(-1) seeds. The bioconcentration factor reduced significantly in shoots and seeds in comparison to roots. The data indicates that R. communis is highly tolerant to Cd contamination and can be used for remediation of heavy metal polluted sites.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
    • "In a similar manner, Martins et al. (2011) also observed a variation in GR activity according to treatment in their work with Enterobacter sp. when exposed to the herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor, when two distinct GR isoenzymes were induced specifically by the metolachlor herbicide, suggesting that GR takes part in herbicide tolerance. Further studies on the regulation of GR would significantly help to understand how important it is and its involvement in stress response in bacteria whatever the type of the xenobiotic used. "

    No preview · Dataset · Aug 2015
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