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The effect of prolonged whole-body cryostimulation treatment with different amounts of sessions on chosen pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in healthy men

Authors:
  • University of Physical Education in Krakow, Poland

Abstract

Cryotherapy is used in the early treatment of acute injuries (sprains, strains, fractures) yet only a few papers discuss the possible influence of whole-body cryostimulation on inflammation mechanisms or immunology. It is postulated that cold exposure can have an immunostimulating effect related to enhanced noradrenaline response and can be connected with paracrine effects. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different sequences of whole-body cryostimulations on the level of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in healthy individuals. The research involved 45 healthy men divided into three groups. The groups were subjected to 5, 10 or 20, 3-minute long whole-body cryostimulations each day at -130°C. Blood was collected for analysis before the stimulations, after completion of the whole series, and 2 weeks after completion of the series, for the examination of any long-term effect. The analysis of results showed that in response to cryostimulation, the level of ani-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 increased while Il-1α cytokine level decreased. It seems that the most advantageous sequence was the series of 20 cryostimulations due to the longest lasting effects of stimulation after the completion of the whole series of treatments.
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... However, the rationale for prescribing WBC in post-COVID symptoms appears in line with the existing evidence of clinical and functional benefits following WBC documented in other musculoskeletal, neurological, and psychiatric conditions. Pain, fatigue, and alleviation of inflammatory symptoms after WBC, as also shown in this report, appear to be related to reduced nerve conduction and acetylcholine formation and lower levels of oxidative stress and inflammation [29], but a full understanding of the underlying mechanisms is yet to be fully disclosed. Importantly, the benefits of WBC seem to appear rapidly (1 week). ...
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