Small leucine-rich proteoglycans, decorin and fibromodulin, are reduced in postburn hypertrophic scar

Article · May 2011with13 Reads
DOI: 10.1111/j.1524-475X.2011.00677.x · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are extracellular matrix molecules that regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and inhibit transforming growth factor-β activity; thus, they may play a critical role in wound healing and scar formation. Hypertrophic scarring is a dermal form of fibroproliferative disorders, which occurs in over 70% of burn patients and leads to disfigurement and limitations in function. By understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to scarring after injury, new clinical therapeutic approaches can by developed to minimize abnormal scar formation in hypertrophic scarring and other fibroproliferative disorders. To study the expression and localization of SLRPs with connective tissue cells in tissue immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence staining, immunoblotting, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were used in normal skin and hypertrophic scar (HTS). In normal skin, there was more decorin and fibromodulin accumulation in the superficial layers than in the deeper dermal layers. The levels of decorin and fibromodulin were significantly lower in HTS, whereas biglycan was increased when compared with normal skin. There was an increased expression of biglycan, fibromodulin, and lumican in the basement membrane and around basal epithelial cells. In contrast, these proteoglycans were absent or weakly expressed in HTS. The findings suggest that down-regulation of SLRPs after wound healing in deep injuries to the skin plays an important role in the development of fibrosis and HTS.
Article
November 2008 · Wound Repair and Regeneration · Impact Factor: 2.75
    Wound healing in oral mucosa is fast and results in little scar formation as compared with skin. The biological mechanisms underlying this property are poorly understood but may provide valuable information about the factors that promote wound regeneration. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican are extracellular matrix molecules that regulate... [Show full abstract]
    Article
    December 2011 · Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association · Impact Factor: 1.43
      Hypertrophic scar (HTS) represents the dermal equivalent of fibroproliferative disorders. Fibroblasts from the deep dermis are implicated in the development of HTS after injuries that involve deeper areas of the skin. However, fibroblasts that reside in the superficial layer of the skin show antifibrotic properties, and injuries limited to this area heal with little or no scarring. Previously,... [Show full abstract]
      Article
      November 2011 · Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association · Impact Factor: 1.43
        Hypertrophic scar (HTS) occurs after injuries involving the deep dermis, while superficial wounds (SWs) to the skin heal with minimal or no scarring. The levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) with fibroblast subtype and function may influence the development of HTS. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression and localization of... [Show full abstract]
        Article
        September 2013 · Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) · Impact Factor: 1.29
          Hypertrophic scar (HTS) represents the dermal equivalent of fibroproliferative disorders that occur after injury involving the deep dermis while superficial wounds to the skin heal with minimal or no scarring. HTS is characterized by progressive deposition of collagen that occurs with high frequency in adult dermal wounds following traumatic or thermal injury. Increased levels of transforming... [Show full abstract]
          Article
          August 2012 · The Journal of urology · Impact Factor: 4.47
            Partial bladder outlet obstruction has been shown in a rat model to progress from inflammation to hypertrophy to fibrosis. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans are extracellular matrix components associated with collagen fibrillogenesis and resultant scar formation. Two such critical small leucine-rich proteoglycans are decorin and biglycan. We hypothesized that in keeping with other scar models,... [Show full abstract]
            Discover more