Article

Interactive Games to Promote Behavior Change in Prevention and Treatment

Alloy Ventures, 400 Hamilton Ave, Ste 400, Palo Alto, CA 94301, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 35.29). 03/2011; 305(16):1704-5. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2011.408
Source: PubMed

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    • "Participants who may be particularly sensitive to criticism or rejection are able to acquire and rehearse skills in a nonthreatening context where choices are associated with clear outcomes (Read, & Shortell, 2011). This rehearsal and feedback can be an effective tool for behaviour change (Read et al., 2011) and has been shown to enhance locus of control and self-efficacy (Goh, Ang, & Tan, 2008). In these ways, features of serious gaming might offer opportunities to increase the impact of computerised therapies for depression. "
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract: Serious games (computerised interventions which utilise gaming for serious purposes) have been shown to support improved outcomes in several health conditions. We aimed to review evidence regarding serious games for depression. We undertook electronic searches of PsycInfo, EMBASE and Medline, using terms relevant to computer games and depression. We included fulltext articles published in English in peer-reviewed literature since 2000, where the intervention was designed to treat or prevent depression and which included pre-and post-intervention measurement of depression. Nine studies relating to a total of six interventions met inclusion criteria. Most studies were small and were carried out by the developers of the programs. All were tested with young people (ages between 9 and 25 years). Most reported promising results with some positive impact on depression although one universal program had mixed results. Serious gaming interventions show promise for depression, however evidence is currently very limited.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Revista de Psicopatología y Psicología Clínica
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    • "Participants who may be particularly sensitive to criticism or rejection are able to acquire and rehearse skills in a non-threatening context where choices are associated with clear outcomes (Read, & Shortell , 2011). This rehearsal and feedback can be an effective tool for behaviour change (Read et al., 2011) and has been shown to enhance locus of control and self-effi cacy (Goh, Ang, & Tan, 2008). In these ways, features of serious gaming might offer opportunities to increase the impact of computerised therapies for depression. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Serious games (computerised interventions which utilise gaming for serious purposes) have been shown to support improved outcomes in several health conditions. We aimed to review evidence regarding serious games for depression. We undertook electronic searches of PsycInfo, EMBASE and Medline, using terms relevant to computer games and depression. We included fulltext articles published in English in peer-reviewed literature since 2000, where the intervention was designed to treat or prevent depression and which included pre-and post-intervention measurement of depression. Nine studies relating to a total of six interventions met inclusion criteria. Most studies were small and were carried out by the developers of the programs. All were tested with young people (ages between 9 and 25 years). Most reported promising results with some positive impact on depression although one universal program had mixed results. Serious gaming interventions show promise for depression, however evidence is currently very limited.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Revista de Psicopatología y Psicología Clínica
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    • "Gaming can also act as a medium to promote learning and improve health. Designers have used video games to produce positive outcomes such as increasing the effectiveness of healthcare (Read and Shortell, 2011) and improving scholastic performance (Kiili, 2005b). Understanding the process through which a game can create a fun, rewarding, and enjoyable experience has been the focus of research in game studies (Cowley et al., 2008). "
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    ABSTRACT: Flow, a state of optimal experience where one is completely absorbed and immersed in an activity, is an important phenomenon for studying and designing games. In this article, we synthesise the literature on flow in gaming to discern existing research streams, and identify the antecedents, dimensions, and outcomes of flow which are then integrated into a framework. Based on the findings, we provide suggestions for game design elements that practitioners, such as game designers, may find useful for creating or inducing flow in gaming. We also discuss implications for research and practice as well as provide suggestions for future research.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
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