ArticlePDF Available

Abstract and Figures

The purpose of these acoustical patent reviews is to provide enough information for a Journal reader to decide whether to seek more information from the patent itself. Any opinions expressed here are those of the reviewers as individuals and are not legal opinions. Printed copies of United States Patents may be ordered at $3.00 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, Washington, DC 20231. Patents are available via the Internet at http://www.uspto.gov.
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
Content may be subject to copyright.
REVIEWS OF ACOUSTICAL PATENTS
Sean A. Fulop
Dept. of Linguistics, PB92
California State University Fresno
5245 N. Backer Ave., Fresno, California 93740
Lloyd Rice
11222 Flatiron Drive, Lafayette, Colorado 80026
The purpose of these acoustical patent reviews is to provide enough information for a Journal reader to
decide whether to seek more information from the patent itself. Any opinions expressed here are those of
the reviewers as individuals and are not legal opinions. Printed copies of United States Patents may be
ordered at $3.00 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, Washington, DC 20231. Patents
are available via the Internet at http://www.uspto.gov.
Reviewers for this issue:
GEORGE L. AUGSPURGER, Perception, Incorporated, Box 39536, Los Angeles, California 90039
JOHN ERDREICH, Ostergaard Acoustical Associates, 200 Executive Drive, West Orange, New Jersey 07052
SEAN A. FULOP, California State University, Fresno, 5245 N. Backer Avenue M/S PB92, Fresno, California 93740-8001
JEROME A. HELFFRICH, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78228
MARK KAHRS, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261
DAVID PREVES, Starkey Laboratories, 6600 Washington Ave. S., Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344
CARL J. ROSENBERG, Acentech Incorporated, 33 Moulton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
NEIL A. SHAW, Menlo Scientific Acoustics, Inc., Post Office Box 1610, Topanga, California 90290
ERIC E. UNGAR, Acentech, Incorporated, 33 Moulton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
ROBERT C. WAAG, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627
7,773,454
43.20.Hq METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CEMENT
EVALUATION USING MULTIPLE ACOUSTIC WAVE
TYPES
Joseph Gregory Barolak et al., assignors to Baker Hughes
Incorporated
10 August 2010 (Class 367/35); filed 22 February 2006
Downhole tool 8 is lowered into well bore 2. With tool 8 proximate
to the casing 4, both shear and Lamb acoustic waves can be induced in
the casing by transducers 18, and these can be conducted in the casing at
various modes. The attenuation modes of the waves are recorded, and the
magnitude of the shear and Lamb waves is analyzed. Free pipe and/or
micro-annulus 20 conditions can thus be revealed.—NAS
7,793,546
43.35.Zc ULTRASONIC FLAW DETECTION METHOD
AND ULTRASONIC FLAW DETECTION DEVICE
Hiroaki Katsura et al., assignors to Panasonic Corporation
14 September 2010 (Class 73/644); filed in Japan 11 July 2005
The device described here, intended for the inspection of circuit
boards, employs a container whose bottom consists of a polymeric mem-
brane and which houses a liquid and a transducer. The circuit board to be
inspected is mounted essentially horizontally in a fixture, and the container
assembly is lowered onto it. Apertures and evacuation means are provided
under the circuit board to enable good contact of the membrane against
the circuit board.—EEU
7,804,598
43.35.Zc HIGH POWER ACOUSTIC RESONATOR
WITH INTEGRATED OPTICAL INTERFACIAL
ELEMENTS
Clive E. Hall et al., assignors to Schlumberger Technology
Corporation
28 September 2010 (Class 356/445); filed 4 August 2006
This is one of a group of cross-referenced patents, all dealing with
the maintenance of optical windows in remote or fouling environments.
J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129 (3), March 2011 V
C2011 Acoustical Society of America 16610001-4966/2011/129(3)/1661/15/$30.00
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
In some cases, the window is cleaned with high-power ultrasonic energy.
The patent covers the basic combination of an optical window 40, an opti-
cal conduit 30, and a ‘‘high power acoustic resonator’’ 10. The patent
itself is one of those in which each embodiment encompasses roughly half
of the known universe, yet, ‘‘… is merely exemplary in nature and is in
no way intended to limit the invention, its application, or uses.’’—GLA
7,804,971
43.38.Bs ELECTROSTATIC ULTRASONIC
TRANSDUCER, ULTRASONIC SPEAKER AND
DISPLAY DEVICE
Kinya Matsuzawa, assignor to Seiko Epson Corporation
28 September 2010 (Class 381/191); filed in Japan 11 July 2005
This is the latest in a series of Seiko Epson patents dealing with the
design of electrostatic loudspeakers used as ultrasonic transducers. As
with all other electrostatic designs, electrode spacing ‘‘t’’ should be as
small as possible for highest efficiency, yet slightly greater than the maxi-
mum diaphragm excursion. The patent’s sole novel feature appears to be a
formula for calculating ‘‘t’’ based on the operating frequency and the
desired acoustic output level.—GLA
7,801,313
43.38.Hz METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
REPRODUCING AUDIO SIGNAL
Yoichiro Sako et al., assignors to Sony Corporation
21 September 2010 (Class 381/17); filed in Japan 12 October 2004
This patent is both interesting and puzzling. The references cited
include a paper by R. J. Geluk, presented at an Audio Engineering Society
convention in February 1994. Geluk describes a loudspeaker arrangement
for two-channel stereo reproduction in which two horizontal line arrays
are placed end-to-end in front of the listening area. Digital steering is then
used to generate two intersecting angled beams that can produce balanced
left/right acoustic signals over a large listening area. In effect, virtual left
and right sources are located at infinity. A number of questions and objec-
tions come to mind (for one thing, line arrays do not produce planar wave
fronts), but the issue here is how Sony managed to patent the idea. To
this reviewer it appears that the paper by Geluk has simply been rewritten
and padded out with a fair amount of smoke and mirrors.—GLA
7,766,122
43.38.Ja ACOUSTIC ENERGY PROJECTION
SYSTEM
Curtis E. Graber, Woodburn, Indiana
3 August 2010 (Class 181/191); filed 10 June 2009
An annulus of audio frequency transducers disposed at focal ring FR
of hyperbolic reflective surface 22 with radiant axis RA provides a
focused sound beam. The hyperbolic curve 14 can be mirrored about the
1662 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1662
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
point near ‘‘14’’ to provide both an inner and outer reflector, similar to a
bundt cake pan. Parabolic sections are used in an alternate embodiment.
The patent further describes how the device, in the first embodiment with
what appears to be an implementation about 6 feet in diameter, can be
used as an ‘‘extraordinarily rich surround sound system.’’—NAS
7,773,765
43.38.Ja RECTANGULAR HORN FOR VARIED
ACOUSTIC DRIVERS
Curtis E. Graber, Woodburn, Indiana
10 August 2010 (Class 381/342); filed 25 July 2006
Planar ribbon transducer 34 is mounted at the apex of a ‘‘tractix ex-
ponential’’ horn comprised of sides 16 and 18 and enclosed by ‘‘standing
wave canceling cavity’’ 44. Line arrays of conventional cone-type loud-
speakers 28 are mounted in the sides and are ‘‘coupled to the environment
by restricted portals.’’ This implementation of a planar ribbon, which has
essentially infinitesimal spacing between elements, is said to have ‘‘no
practical upper limit in the human audio range,’’ which in turn is said
to provide better performance than that from discrete drivers, in which
‘‘the high audio sound’’ is limited by the (size and) spacing between the
drivers.—NAS
7,796,768
43.38.Ja VARIABLE ALIGNMENT LOUDSPEAKER
SYSTEM
Pedro Manrique, assignor to Harman International Industries,
Incorporated
14 September 2010 (Class 381/96); filed 28 September 2004
A surprising number of impractical inventions are patented by large
corporations. In this recent example, a functional loudspeaker 208 is used
as a passive radiator. By connecting various resistive or reactive loads
across the voice coil terminals it is possible to adjust damping and reso-
nance frequency within moderate limits. The patent examiner was so taken
with this concept that 53 claims were allowed. For real-world applications,
however, there are three reasons why it is not such a great idea: (1) Cost;
a loudspeaker is much more expensive than a comparable passive radiator,
which is already more expensive than a simple vent. (2) There is no rea-
son to adjust damping; any passive radiator is already overdamped. (3) It
is much easier to adjust the effective mass by adding or removing real
mass, an option included with many commercial passive radiators. More-
over, using a capacitor to create synthetic mass has the undesirable side
effect of adding damping as well. This still leaves the option of an active
load. A negative impedance amplifier (not mentioned in the patent) could
theoretically alter effective mass and damping over a wide range. It would
make an interesting laboratory experiment, but chances of commercial
success are probably less than zero.—GLA
7,796,774
43.38.Ja PORTABLE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
AMPLIFIER
Neil Fredrick Albert, Bronx, New York
14 September 2010 (Class 381/386); filed 7 July 2004
A shallow, rectangular cabinet 12 houses a loudspeaker, an audio
amplifier, and batteries. The loudspeaker’s magnetic assembly is clamped
into a protruding rear cylinder 13. Internal ribs allow sound waves to pass
over the magnet and exit from the rear of the cylinder. The abstract and
the patent text explain at length how retractable legs create a gap between
the cylinder and a table top 36 and how this gap acts as a rear vent for
the loudspeaker. For some reason, however, the legs, the gap, and the ta-
ble top placement are all absent from the claims and therefore not pro-
tected by the patent.—GLA
1663 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1663
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
7,801,323
43.38.Ja SOUND MODIFYING CAP FOR HOUSING
Thomas A. Shain, assignor to Floyd Bell, Incorporated
21 September 2010 (Class 381/386); filed 25 January 2005
Some old acoustic phonographs actually had volume control knobs.
A cable-operated plug functioned like a trumpet mute. At that time it was
a practical method for achieving the desired effect. Now, more than 100
years later, this patent reveals how a rotary valve can adjust the level of a
loudspeaker. Exactly who has been smoking what?—GLA
7,795,969
43.38.Lc DIGITAL AMPLIFIER
Javier F. Esguevillas et al., assignors to NXP B.V.
14 September 2010 (Class 330/136); filed in the European Patent
Office 7 April 2003
Class D (pulse width modulation) audio amplifiers were an interest-
ing novelty only a few years ago. Today they are used in everything from
telephones to high-end audio systems. A common problem in designing
low-cost Class D amplifiers is the need for stiff power supply regulation
and that is the subject of this patent. Instead of comparing the supply volt-
age to a precise reference voltage, feed-forward compensation is derived
from the low frequency content of the input signal. The scheme is applica-
ble to fully digital amplifiers.—GLA
7,797,065
43.38.Lc AUTOMUTE DETECTION IN DIGITAL
AUDIO AMPLIFIERS
David Edward Zaucha et al., assignors to Texas Instruments
Incorporated
14 September 2010 (Class 700/94); filed 2 May 2005
After eying the list of co-inventors one might infer that it takes six
Texas Instruments engineers to mute an audio amplifier. In the case of a
Class D amplifier, however, the task is more than trivial. In fact, the pat-
ent is a companion of two others, all dealing with clicks, pops, and other
unwanted noise in pulse width modulation (PWM) amplifiers. The area of
concern here is ‘‘automute’’ operation. In typical Class D circuits, a zero-
amplitude input signal produces a 50% PWM duty cycle, resulting in heat
and audible noise when idling. Muting and unmuting the modulator are
assumed to be desirable, but complicated in practice by the time constant
of the output lowpass filter. The patent discloses an improved automute
method and circuitry for an all-digital amplifier—one in which the input
is a pulse code modulated signal from a CD player or the like. Full-scale
digital signal processing is involved, but implementation is said to be
smaller and cheaper than an output muting relay.—GLA
7,756,275
43.38.Md DYNAMICALLY CONTROLLED DIGITAL
AUDIO SIGNAL PROCESSOR
Duncan J. Crundwell and David P. Haydon et al., assignors to
1602 Group LLC
13 July 2010 (Class 381/59); filed 16 September 2005
A means for encoding and decoding information during the produc-
tion and playback of a soundtrack which uses delayed cross matrices to
restore realistic auditory features for a sound image is described. The
method is said to be independent of the number of source and playback
1664 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1664
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
channels and also provides for a larger listening area for the sound
image.—NAS
7,796,195
43.38.Md CIRCUIT FOR ELIMINATING ABNORMAL
SOUND
Shih-Hua Tseng and Wen-Chang Yang, assignors to Tatung
Company
14 September 2010 (Class 348/632); filed in Taiwan 29 March 2006
Since it is now possible to patent anything obvious, the inventors
decided to claim that muting the last stage of a power amplifier 6 is novel.
The wrinkle that allows this claim is that it is hooked up to a DVD player
with a stop button.—MK
7,796,773
43.38.Si COMMUNICATION DEVICE COMPRISING
SOUND-CONVEYING MEANS FOR TWO SOUND-
PRODUCING MODES
Erich Klein, assignor to NXP B.V.
14 September 2010 (Class 381/351); filed in the European Patent
Office 15 July 2003
Warning: the text of this patent is written in long, single-sentence
paragraphs and is almost impossible to follow. The invention itself is one
of many devoted to the conflicting requirements of hand-held vs loud-
speaker operation of cellular telephones. A single miniature loudspeaker is
usually used for both functions and is simply driven harder in the loud-
speaker mode. However, if the user inadvertently holds the handset to his
ear while in the high-power mode, hearing damage can result. A preven-
tive approach found in much prior art relies on additional sound outlets
located outside the area covered by the ear, and this patent describes one
more variant. The illustration shows a section through a cellular phone,
with the front (operating) surface at the bottom. Loudspeaker 3 drives
front chamber 12, which vents into side chambers 21A, 21B. Sound from
these chambers exits to free air as indicated by arrows P1, P2. The cham-
bers also have earphone openings 23A, 23B. Optional screens 24A, 24B
provide additional acoustic resistance to balance the ratio of sound deliv-
ered through the two sets of exits.—GLA
7,809,147
43.38.Si OSSEOUS CONDUCTION ACOUSTIC
TRANSDUCER
Marco Giannetti, assignor to COS.EL.GI S.p.A.
5 October 2010 (Class 381/151); filed in Italy 4 May 2005
This improved bone conduction headset incorporates a vibration
transducer 7 and a rigid coupling member 6. The assembly snaps into
resilient pad 5 which in turn snaps into headset housing 8. The design is
said to be simpler and more rugged than typical prior art.—GLA
1665 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1665
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
7,801,317
43.38.Vk APPARATUS AND METHOD OF
REPRODUCING WIDE STEREO SOUND
Sun-min Kim, assignor to Samsung Electronics Company, Limited
21 September 2010 (Class 381/303); filed in Republic of Korea 11
June 2004
The invention disclosed here is a fairly elaborate method for creating
a wider stereo sound stage from two closely spaced loudspeakers, such as
those in a typical TV receiver. The method is customized for an individual
listener whose head-related transfer functions have been measured at two
locations. Binaural synthesis is used to create two virtual sources 182, 192
which are then combined with real sources 180, 190 to subjectively fill
the space between the virtual sources. A suitable tracking device monitors
the location of the listener and the system adjusts itself accordingly. All
of which seems far too complicated for ordinary TV viewing but may be
intended for computer gaming.—GLA
7,801,706
43.40.Sk STRUCTURAL OPTIMIZATION SYSTEM
Hirohisa Enomoto and Shigeru Sakamoto, assignors to Hitachi,
Limited
21 September 2010 (Class 703/1); filed in Japan 7 August 2006
This patent relates to the computer-aided design of structures in
order to avoid resonances at predetermined frequencies. The system
in essence first determines a structure’s natural frequencies based on a
computer model and then tracks the modes that are most closely associ-
ated with these frequencies as changes in structural components are
made.—EEU
7,804,382
43.40.Sk TUNABLE RESONATOR USING FILM
BULK ACOUSTIC RESONATOR (FBAR)
Jea-Shik Shin et al., assignors to Samsung Electronics Company,
Limited
28 September 2010 (Class 333/188); filed in Republic of Korea
1 November 2007
One of the goals of microelectromechanical systems work over the
past 10 years has been to create a practical frequency-tunable resonator.
Most attempts at this have resulted in devices having limited frequency
tuning capability or with the tuning functionality requiring applied vol-
tages of 20 V or more. Practical frequency tunable resonators require tun-
ing voltages on the order of 5 V, tuning ranges of 20%, and compatibility
with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor fabrication processes. The
authors of this patent disclose a novel approach that utilizes bimetallic
membranes that are supported at their edges over a film bulk acoustic res-
onator (FBAR), as shown in the figure. By passing a current through one
or more of the membranes, they can be made to deflect downward and
contact the top of the FBAR, thus adding mass to the region of the FBAR
at its free end, where it will be most sensitive to mass loading. The use of
multiple membranes allows for several discrete frequency shifts, which
can be useful in RF channel multiplexing applications. The use of heating
of a bimetallic structure addresses the problem of high actuation voltages,
because of the low electrical impedance of such a metal structure. Gener-
ally, these structures cannot be switched rapidly due to the low thermal
diffusivity of the alloys used (the authors suggest the use of various Ni/
Fe/Mn alloys) and the unfavorable geometry for heat conduction through
the supports. The authors also suggest that electrostatic actuation can be
used, but this invariably increases the actuation voltage requirements.
Actual performance measurements are not given.—JAH
7,793,763
43.40.Tm SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR DAMPING
VIBRATIONS IN ELEVATOR CABLES
Weidong Zhu and Yan Chen, assignors to University of Maryland,
Baltimore County
14 September 2010 (Class 187/411); filed 8 May 2006
This patent deals with viscous dampers to suppress lateral vibrations
of elevator cables. A damper is disposed between a cable and the guide
rails and can be moved along the length of the rails independently of the
cable in response to a controller that maximizes the damping of the cable
1666 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1666
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
vibration. Optimum damper locations are described on the basis of ideal-
ized analytical models.—EEU
7,798,004
43.40.Tm MONITORING SYSTEM FOR MACHINE
VIBRATION
Kevin Jay Lueschow, assignor to Caterpillar Incorporated
21 September 2010 (Class 73/661); filed 28 January 2008
A system for monitoring the vibration exposure of personnel operat-
ing a vehicle, such as a bulldozer, uses a sensor that is attached to the per-
son’s seat or safety harness. The sensor’s output is processed in relation to
standard measures of human vibration exposure, and the result may be
used to provide suitable displays or alarms.—EEU
7,804,211
43.40.Tm VIBRATION GENERATOR
Albrecht Kleibl and Christian Heichel, assignors to ABI
Anlagentechnik-Baumaschinen-Industriebedarf Maschinenfab-
rik und Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH
28 September 2010 (Class 310/81); filed in the European Patent
Office 28 March 2008
This vibration generator, applicable to pile driving and similar appli-
cations, is intended to generate forces in either the advance or retraction
directions. It uses rotating eccentric masses that are interconnected by
gears via a swivel motor that can adjust the relative phases of these
masses. The two masses (or sets of masses) operate at a speed ratio of 2:1
and have eccentricity ratios between 6:1 and 10:1.—EEU
7,806,209
43.40.Tm APPARATUS AND METHOD TO REDUCE
VIBRATIONS ON A TRACKED WORK MACHINE
Michael R. Standish et al., assignors to Caterpillar Incorporated
5 October 2010 (Class 180/9.5); filed 10 January 2006
In order to enable a tracked machine, such as a bulldozer, to carry
out fine working operations, the tensions in its two tracks are adjusted so
that the loosely hanging upper portions of the tracks do not have the same
natural frequency. These adjustments typically are made by positioning
idler wheels that support the upper track portions or by actuating track
tensioning systems.—EEU
7,807,922
43.40.Tm VIBRATION RESISTANT CABLE
Stephen L. Spruell, assignor to Southwire Company
5 October 2010 (Class 174/36); filed 23 July 2008
Power line cables with relatively high damping, so as to limit their
wind-induced Aeolian vibrations, are obtained by twisting one conductor
around another with various and possibly non-uniform twisting angles.
The lay lengths also may be chosen to reduce or avoid ‘‘galloping’’ vibra-
tions that can occur as wind blows across power lines on which ice has
built up.—EEU
7,793,547
43.40.Yq SELF-SUPPORTING AND SELF-ALIGNING
VIBRATION EXCITATOR
Petrus Johannes Gerardus van der Linden, Diest, Belgium
14 September 2010 (Class 73/662); filed in Netherlands 8 February
2005
The shaker of this patent is intended to be attached to a test object
(such as a panel of an automobile body) at one point and to vibrate that
object in the direction perpendicular to the attachment surface, regardless
of the orientation of that surface. This is accomplished by attaching the
shaker to the test object by its ‘‘stinger’’—the connection between the
force generator and the test object—and designing the stinger so that
the lateral and rotational deflections it experiences due to the weight of
the driver assembly are such that the line of action of the generated force
always goes through the attachment point.—EEU
7,805,281
43.40.Yq VIBRATION ANALYSIS
Nigel Leigh, assignor to Commtest Instruments Limited
28 September 2010 (Class 702/189); filed in New Zealand 16
December 2004
Vibration analysis for fault detection in machines is accomplished by
using a sensor to obtain an electrical signal for analysis, digitizing that
signal based on an upper cut-off frequency, and then deriving other sig-
nals by processing the digitized signal. The processing may involve
extraction of lower-frequency signals and the determination of envelopes
and maxima, etc.—EEU
7,798,448
43.50.Nm FLOW-DRIVEN OSCILLATING ACOUSTIC
ATTENUATOR
Alan J. Bilanin et al., assignors to Continuum Dynamics,
Incorporated
21 September 2010 (Class 244/130); filed 9 January 2008
This patent discloses a technique for mitigating the pressure oscilla-
tions caused by flow over an open-faced cavity. The author specifically
targets the kind of problems associated with bomb bays, wheel wells, and
other cavities on airplanes and claims to have found a passive solution to
reducing the magnitude of the pressure fluctuations inside these cavities
without significant expenditure of energy, as might be required for active
sound absorbers inside the cavities. The text describes the origin of the
problem and some previous attempts at solving it, and then describes a so-
lution involving a set of vanes that protrude from the skin of the aircraft
into the flow stream just ahead of the cavity. Each vane is flexible in two
dimensions, which is easily affected by the use of cutouts to make hinges
in the metal as shown in the figure. When air passes the vane from left to
right at high velocity (the authors use 100–128 ft/s in their studies), it can
excite the vane into oscillation about both a vertical and a horizontal axis,
breaking up the steady flow of air into a set of vortices of wavelength 10–
100 times the chord length of the vanes prior to the air’s encounter with
the cavity. This was verified experimentally with wind tunnel
1667 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1667
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
measurements and pressure measurements inside a model 7 8 in. cavity,
in which pressure fluctuations were as high as 135 dB before and 125 dB
after treatment, respectively. The authors claim that the technique will
work over a wider range of speeds than those measured, which would
seem desirable. When will we be seeing these on aircraft?—JAH
7,797,116
43.50.Yw SYSTEM AND METHOD OF ACOUSTIC
DETECTION AND LOCATION OF FIRE SPRINKLER
WATER DISCHARGE
Andrew G. Berezowski et al., assignors to Honeywell International
Incorporated
14 September 2010 (Class 702/66); filed 12 October 2006
The patent describes a system and method for detecting audible acous-
tical signals to localize a sprinkler head that is discharging water.—CJR
7,798,287
43.55.Ti ACOUSTICAL CEILING PANELS
Kevin J. Surace et al., assignors to Serious Materials, Incorporated
21 September 2010 (Class 181/290); filed 20 January 2005
This ceiling panel is designed to provide improved sound transmis-
sion loss (through the use of a multi-layered damping configuration) as
well as a sound absorptive finish (if desired). The panel can be supported
in a suspended grid and thus can be installed like a typical acoustic tile
ceiling. Many different configurations of the panels are listed.—CJR
7,799,410
43.55.Ti ACOUSTICAL SOUND PROOFING
MATERIAL WITH IMPROVED DAMPING AT SELECT
FREQUENCIES AND METHODS FOR
MANUFACTURING SAME
Brandon D. Tinianov, assignor to Serious Materials, Incorporated
21 September 2010 (Class 428/212); filed 31 August 2007
The patent presents expansion of the multi-layered, constrained layer
damping materials from previous patents, with a seemingly endless variety
of layers of materials, types of interlayers, different materials, etc.—CJR
7,769,183
43.60.Dh SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR AUTOMATIC
ROOM ACOUSTIC CORRECTION IN MULTI-
CHANNEL AUDIO ENVIRONMENTS
Sunil Bharitkar and Chris Kyriakakis, assignors to University of
Southern California
3 August 2010 (Class 381/59); filed 20 June 2003
A means of processing audio signals so that the ‘‘distortion at a
receiving position mainly due to interaction with room boundaries and the
buildup of standing waves at low frequencies’’ at multiple positions in an
enclosure, such as a ‘‘room, automobile interior, movie theaters, etc.’’ is
‘‘substantially distortion-free.’’ In one aspect of the invention the general
response in the enclosure is determined by a pattern recognition method,
‘‘determining a minimum-phase signal and all-pass signal from the general
response so that the room correction filter could be the inverse of the min-
imum phase signal,’’ or it could be ‘‘the inverse of the minimum-phase
signal and a matched filter that is derived from the all-pass signal.’’
Another aspect of the invention uses the ‘‘cluster room acoustical
response’’ to achieve the same end.—NAS
7,610,205
43.60.Ek HIGH QUALITY TIME-SCALING AND
PITCH-SCALING OF AUDIO SIGNALS
Brett Graham Crockett, assignor to Dolby Laboratories Licensing
Corporation
27 October 2009 (Class 704/503); filed 12 February 2002
This patent is a large hodge-podge of methods for time- and pitch-
scaling of audio signals in general. There are numerous descriptions of
psychoacoustic criteria, cross-fading at splice points, and other things
which are all part of prior art. It is difficult to tease out what novel things
are here. The eight claims deal chiefly with simplistic methods for select-
ing splice points and dividing a signal into ‘‘auditory events’’ for subse-
quent psychoacoustic analysis. It seems that none of the hard stuff is
actually in the claims.—SAF
1668 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1668
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
7,804,964
43.64.Ha DEVICE FOR PROTECTING THE HEARING
FROM LOUD MRT SOUNDS
Axel Schreiber, assignor to Siemens Aktiengesellschaft
28 September 2010 (Class 381/73.1); filed in Germany 5 January
2005
This concept for attenuating the sound experienced by a patient
undergoing a magnetic resonance imaging procedure is based on exciting
the middle ear reflexes, much like the click of a shotgun causes the mid-
dle ear muscles to contract prior to the discharge. In this case, an intense
sound of sufficient level is created prior to the onset of the magnet excita-
tion and may be continued during the examination.—JE
7,793,756
43.66.Ts REPLACEABLE MICROPHONE
PROTECTIVE MEMBRANE FOR HEARING DEVICES
Erdal Karamuk, assignor to Phonak AG
14 September 2010 (Class 181/135); filed 10 May 2005
A protection element that prevents contamination in a hearing aid is
integrally placed in the casing wall in line with the outer surface of the
hearing aid casing. The element comprises a thin, partially flexible mem-
brane made of a thermoplastic polymer on a circular, hollow, tapered, cyl-
inderlike body or carrier.—DAP
7,796,271
43.66.Ts EAR CANAL HOLOGRAM FOR HEARING
APPARATUSES
Ju
¨rgen Reithinger, assignor to Siemens Audiologisch Technik
GmbH
14 September 2010 (Class 356/457); filed 29 November 2007
To obtain an image of a hearing aid wearer’s ear canal, a holography
unit and light source are inserted into the ear canal. A semi-transparent
disk on the holography unit divides the light beam into illumination and
reference beams. A mirror on the holograph unit redirects the reference
beam coming from the disk onto a digital recording sensor, which records
an interference pattern and an object beam resulting from reflecting the
illumination beam onto a portion of the ear canal. Several holograms may
be combined to produce the entire ear canal geometry. A molding unit
molds the hearing apparatus housing shell from the hologram.—DAP
7,796,769
43.66.Ts METHODS AND APPARATUS FOR
PROCESSING AUDIO SIGNALS
Amir Abolfathi, assignor to Sonitus Medical, Incorporated
14 September 2010 (Class 381/312); filed 7 February 2007
An apparatus comprises a housing with a transducer contacting and
transmitting sound vibrations, resulting from a microphone and processor,
to the surface of least one tooth without bonding and without anatomical
modification. An interference fit is produced between the apparatus and at
least two surfaces of a tooth. A second microphone signal may be ampli-
tude shifted and/or phase shifted such that the sum of the two signals can-
cels the second signal. A different frequency range of the output may be
sent to a second vibratory transducer coupled to a second tooth.—DAP
1669 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1669
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
7,796,770
43.66.Ts HEARING AID WITH FREQUENCY
CHANNELS
Monika Bertges Reber and Matthias Schefer, assignors to
Bernafon AG
14 September 2010 (Class 381/320); filed in the European Patent
Office 22 December 2004
A method to shape the hearing aid frequency response is selected
from at least two methods, which include choosing the number of process-
ing channels according to the sound environment. The choice of the num-
ber of channels may be made automatically or by the hearing aid
wearer.—DAP
7,797,022
43.66.Ts METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
WIRELESS COMPONENTS FOR HEARING
COMMUNICATION DEVICES
Terrance A. Ruzicka et al., assignors to Starkey Laboratories,
Incorporated
14 September 2010 (Class 455/557); filed 16 December 2005
A hearing communication device comprises several internal compo-
nents within an enclosure. To eliminate interconnecting wires, first and
second components include a wireless receiver and transmitter, respec-
tively, to communicate information from a first component to a second
component. The components include a power supply wirelessly connected
to at least one wireless microphone, an amplifier, a speaker, and a signal
processor within the enclosure. An external control selectively establishes
communication with at least one of the internal components.—DAP
7,801,318
43.66.Ts HEARING AID DEVICE WITH MEANS FOR
FEEDBACK COMPENSATION
Roland Barthel, assignor to Siemens Audiologisch Technik GmbH
21 September 2010 (Class 381/312); filed in Germany 21 June 2005
A signal source emits a test voice signal through the hearing aid out-
put for providing information to the wearer. A response signal, originating
from the emitted information signal, is detected and analyzed to obtain a
feedback estimate, and at least one of several feedback reduction parame-
ters are adjusted accordingly. The information signal may be generated in
the hearing device and may inform the hearing aid wearer of a device
adjustment, the state of the hearing device, or an event.—DAP
7,801,319
43.66.Ts METHODS AND APPARATUS FOR
PROCESSING AUDIO SIGNALS
Amir Abolfathi, assignor to Sonitus Medical, Incorporated
21 September 2010 (Class 381/326); filed 7 February 2007
A first auditory signal, received by at least one microphone, is priori-
tized with a second auditory signal, and the two are multiplexed into a
combined signal which is transmitted via an apparatus through a surface
of at least one tooth of the user. The apparatus comprises a housing with
at least one transducer contacting at least one tooth without bonding and
without requiring anatomical modification. An interference fit is produced
between the apparatus and at least two surfaces of a tooth. The second
signal may be received wirelessly and/or by a second microphone.—DAP
7,804,974
43.66.Ts HEARING AID AND A METHOD OF
PROCESSING SIGNALS
Carsten Paludan-Muller and Martin Hansen, assignors to Widex
A/S
28 September 2010 (Class 381/317); filed in the World Intellectual
Property Organization 24 November 2003
The goal is to optimize speech intelligibility with a hearing aid. A
table of hearing aid digital signal processing (DSP) parameters is mapped
to a set of stored noise classes and noise levels to classify a background
noise type and estimate its level. A set of processing parameters is
retrieved from the table according to the noise classification and noise
level, and a Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) gain is calculated. SII gain
1670 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1670
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
may be calculated via a trained neural net with several input parameters,
including hearing threshold levels, estimated noise levels, and noise classi-
fication. DSP parameters are modified to optimize the SII.—DAP
7,805,198
43.66.Ts OPTIMIZING PITCH AND OTHER SPEECH
STIMULI ALLOCATION IN A COCHLEAR IMPLANT
Edward H Overstreet et al., assignors to Advanced Bionics, LLC
28 September 2010 (Class 607/57); filed 31 July 2007
A cochlear implant frequency map correlating cochlear locations to
audio frequencies is obtained by applying two signals having two different
frequencies with known harmonic relationship to locations within a user’s
cochlea through a multi-electrode array whose electrodes are associated
with particular frequencies. The location at which the first signal is
applied is shifted until the user selects one tonal variation that is best per-
ceived to conform to the known harmonic relationship with the second
signal. The signals may be spectral components of a known speech sound,
in which case the user selects the tonal variation perceived as best produc-
ing the known speech sound. Shifting the location of the first signal may
involve current steering.—DAP
7,809,149
43.66.Ts MICROPHONE PLACEMENT IN HEARING
ASSISTANCE DEVICES TO PROVIDE CONTROLLED
DIRECTIVITY
Thomas Howard Burns, assignor to Starkey Laboratories,
Incorporated
5 October 2010 (Class 381/313); filed 28 May 2009
This patent discusses a hearing aid housing containing two direc-
tional systems having intersecting, separate axes of directivity. Directional
characteristics of the two systems are controlled by adjusting amplitude
and phase. The first and second directional microphone systems may be a
cardioid and a dipole, respectively, and the amplitudes and phases applied
by the digital signal processor to the first and second directional micro-
phone signals may be equal.—DAP
7,809,150
43.66.Ts METHOD AND APPARATUS TO REDUCE
ENTRAINMENT-RELATED ARTIFACTS FOR
HEARING ASSISTANCE SYSTEMS
Harikrishna P. Natarajan and Jon S. Kindred, assignors to
Starkey Laboratories, Incorporated
5 October 2010 (Class 381/318); filed 27 May 2004
Upon detecting entrainment (an undesirable whistlelike audio artifact
containing harmonics of a periodic input audio signal), the feedback can-
cellation filter coefficients are set equal to those of another filter that
1671 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1671
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
approximate an acoustic path without entrainment characteristics, and
updating of the active filter is suspended.—DAP
7,793,662
43.66.Vt EARPLUG
James Carson Elliott, Bellevue, Washington
14 September 2010 (Class 128/864); filed 14 February 2006
An insert earplug consisting of a cap (102) and interchangeable
stems (104, 108). The stems provide various levels of attenuation.—JE
7,793,663
43.66.Vt METHOD OF FORMING AN EARPLUG BY
LASER ABLATION AND AN EARPLUG FORMED
THEREBY
Duncan Taylor, assignor to 3M Innovative Properties Company
14 September 2010 (Class 128/864); filed 19 December 2007
By using a laser to bore a hole in a hearing protector some short-
comings of other manufacturing processes may be overcome. The hearing
protector is held in a fixture (22) during which the material is ablated to
form the hole. The process can also be used to engrave designs or text on
the protector.—JE
7,606,701
43.72.Ar METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
DETERMINING EMOTIONAL AROUSAL BY SPEECH
ANALYSIS
Yoav Degani and Yishai Zamir, assignors to VoiceSense, Limited
20 October 2009 (Class 704/207); filed in Israel 9 August 2001
This patent is short on specifics. It lays claim to a general method
for determining a degree of general emotional arousal from a voice. The
method involves somehow measuring the degree to which voice pitch and
intensity are held constant during an utterance. The assumption is made
that extensive pitch and intensity changes in the voice are indicative of
emotional arousal, irrespective of which emotions are involved, and that
the extensiveness of such changes can be measured in a subject-independ-
ent way relative to subject-independent values representing ‘‘non-emo-
tional speech.’’—SAF
7,613,611
43.72.Dv METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR VOCAL-
CORD SIGNAL RECOGNITION
Kwan Hyun Cho et al., assignors to Electronics and
Telecommunications Research Institute
3 November 2009 (Class 704/261); filed in Republic of Korea 4
November 2004
This patent proposes to use a ‘‘neck microphone’’ to obtain a
‘‘vocal-cord signal’’ which is supposedly almost noise-free in a noisy
environment. The objective is to use this signal as a stand-in for a proper
speech signal in a speech recognition system in the presence of excessive
noise. Basic cepstral mean subtraction is also suggested for removing any
remaining noise such as channel noise.—SAF
1672 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1672
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
7,805,311
43.72.Gy EMBEDDING AND EMPLOYING
METADATA IN DIGITAL MUSIC USING FORMAT
SPECIFIC METHODS
Mark F. Bocko et al., assignors to University of Rochester
28 September 2010 (Class 704/273); filed 22 June 2007
A digital audio file is analyzed to determine a list of start and end
record locations having at least two consecutive zeros. File store locations
are written into initial record locations of the list. Data to be embedded
and a start key are written into remaining record locations in the list, and
the revised digital audio file is sent to the output. To retrieve the embed-
ded data, a key position is extracted from the modified audio file based on
the list of record locations.—DAP
7,603,275
43.72.Pf SYSTEM, METHOD AND COMPUTER
PROGRAM PRODUCT FOR VERIFYING AN
IDENTITY USING VOICED TO UNVOICED
CLASSIFIERS
Clifford Tavares, assignor to Hitachi, Limited
13 October 2009 (Class 704/250); filed 31 October 2005
This patent proposes speaker verification within a closed database by
means of the ratio between voiced and unvoiced frames in a given utter-
ance. ‘‘The ratio of voiced to unvoiced frames has been found to be a
consistent metric for a given speaker and utterance.’’ This assertion is not
accompanied by a citation nor could this reviewer easily find any litera-
ture which substantiates it, so perhaps the whole idea is locked up in pre-
vious patents. The patent describes making a verification decision for a
speech sample by comparing the equal error rate value computed from the
above ratio (treated as a distance metric relative to a closed database of
speakers) with an equal error rate previously determined for the claimed
identity. The suggested technique could be used alone for verification or
to augment other verification criteria. No data are presented which would
indicate how well this criterion works for the intended purpose.—SAF
7,645,354
43.75.Gh AUDIO DEVICE HAVING DENSE SOUND
ENHANCING COMPONENT
Robert DiSanto, Naples, Florida
12 January 2010 (Class 156/153); filed 30 July 2004
Once again, the supposed superior qualities of granite for musical
instrument construction are exploited. Given the weight, the inventor pro-
poses the use of veneer. This certainly weighs less than a granite solid
body (see earlier review of U.S. Patent 7482518).—MK
7,646,876
43.75.St SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR STEREO
OPERATION OF MICROPHONES FOR VIDEO
CONFERENCING SYSTEM
Peter Chu and Anthony M. Duys, assignors to Polycom,
Incorporated
12 January 2010 (Class 381/92); filed 30 March 2005
Designed as a component in a video conferencing system, the patent
has two parts. First, the packaging of a microphone pod. Second, the assem-
bly of microphone pods to form either an endfire or broadside array.—MK
7,648,416
43.75.St INFORMATION EXPRESSING METHOD
Jun Chuuma and Hiroyuki Kotani, assignors to Sony Computer
Entertainment Incorporated
19 January 2010 (Class 463/40); filed in Japan 8 February 2001
In spite of the non-descript title, the patent covers a full explanation
of a Sony video game with a special emphasis on rhythm training. It is
conceivable this might be of use by beginning drumming students. Flow-
charts are given.—MK
7,650,279
43.75.St SOUND SOURCE SEPARATION
APPARATUS AND SOUND SOURCE SEPARATION
METHOD
Takashi Hiekata and Yohei Ikeda, assignors to Kabushiki Kaisha
Kobe Seiko Sho
19 January 2010 (Class 704/205); filed in Japan 28 July 2006
After first transforming the input signal into the frequency domain,
Independent Component Analysis is proposed as a ‘‘learning computation
unit’’ (box 34) controlling a ‘‘separation filter’’ that distributes the bins
into different channels. After separation, overlap-add is used to resynthe-
size the separated channels.—MK
7,655,856
43.75.St MUSICAL SOUNDING PRODUCING
APPARATUS, MUSICAL SOUND PRODUCING
METHOD, MUSICAL SOUND PRODUCING
PROGRAM, AND RECORDING MEDIUM
Shunsuke Nakamura, assignor to Toyota Motor Kyushu
Incorporated
2 February 2010 (Class 84/645); filed 9 June 2004
The basic idea is sound generation based on image motion. As
shown, two adjacent frames are subtracted, and motion is detected. Syn-
thesis is done by detecting repetition and forming a rhythm track. This
track is then output to a musical instrument digital interface from a musi-
cal database.—MK
7,649,136
43.75.Wx MUSIC REPRODUCING SYSTEM FOR
COLLABORATION, PROGRAM REPRODUCER,
MUSIC DATA DISTRIBUTOR AND PROGRAM
PRODUCER
Haruki Uehara, assignor to Yamaha Corporation
19 January 2010 (Class 84/610); filed in Japan 26 February 2007
This typical Yamaha patent is long on descriptive methods and short
on concepts. This particular disclosure covers the software design for the
Disklavier (digital player piano) server control.—MK
1673 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1673
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
7,794,398
43.80.Vj REAL-TIME VOLUMETRIC BI-PLANE
ULTRASOUND IMAGING AND QUANTIFICATION
Ivan Salgo, assignor to Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.
14 September 2010 (Class 600/443); filed 6 August 2004
Biplane images of the heart are acquired concurrently. Automatic
border detection is used to find the borders of the heart volume. From the
borders, a model is constructed and used for computations. The real-time
biplane images, the real-time model, and quantified measures of the heart
volume are displayed.—RCW
7,794,400
43.80.Vj ELEMENT MAPPING AND TRANSMITTER
FOR CONTINUOUS WAVE ULTRASOUND IMAGING
Robert N. Phelps and David A. Petersen, assignors to Siemens
Medical Solutions USA, Incorporated
14 September 2010 (Class 600/459); filed 26 February 2004
Subarrays of signals with similar phasing are combined without
switching. The combined subarray signals are beamformed to produce an
image. The architecture prior to continuous-wave beamforming provides a
large dynamic range and reduces power consumption.—RCW
7,796,789
43.80.Vj GUIDANCE OF INVASIVE MEDICAL
DEVICES BY THREE DIMENSIONAL ULTRASONIC
IMAGING
Ivan Salgo et al., assignors to Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.
14 September 2010 (Class 382/128); filed 4 March 2004
The operation of an invasive medical device is observed using a three-
dimensional ultrasonic imaging system. Spatially based information from the
invasive device is merged into the ultrasonic image data to produce a live
three-dimensional image of the invasive device. The combined data are shown
as a volume-rendered image or as a wire-frame model of anatomy.—RCW
7,798,965
43.80.Vj METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
PROVIDING REAL-TIME CALCULATION AND
DISPLAY OF TISSUE DEFORMATION IN
ULTRASOUND IMAGING
Hans Torp et al., assignors to G.E. Vingmed Ultrasound AS
21 September 2010 (Class 600/443); filed 10 November 2003
Tissue deformation parameters including strain are determined by an
accumulation of strain-rate estimates from consecutive ultrasound image
frames over an interval of time. The interval may be triggered by using an
R wave in an electrocardiogram. The strain calculation is improved by
moving the sample volume from which the strain is determined according
to the relative displacement of the tissue within the original sample vol-
ume. The relative displacement is determined from the instantaneous ve-
locity of the sample volume.—RCW
7,798,968
43.80.Vj AUTOMATIC DETECTION SYSTEM AND
METHOD OF SPECTRAL DOPPLER BLOOD FLOW
VELOCITY
Yong Li, assignor to Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics
Company, Limited
21 September 2010 (Class 600/455); filed in China 2 August 2005
Ultrasound echoes are processed to obtain Doppler signals produ-
ced by blood flow. The spectral power of the Doppler signal is found as
a function of time. Parameters of the frequency shift or the blood
flow velocity are determined from the power spectra by using a thresh-
old.—RCW
7,798,971
43.80.Vj MOTORIZED ULTRASONIC SCANHEAD
Aime
´Flesch and An Nguyen-Dinh, assignors to Vermon
21 September 2010 (Class 600/459); filed 7 July 2005
This scanhead is designed to be incorporated into endoscopes, lapa-
roscopes, or intracavity probes. In the scanhead, a transducer array is
rotated through 360°to acquire images in successive scan planes around
the axis of the scanhead. The motor that rotates the scanhead is isolated
from the transducer signal connections to minimize interference from elec-
trical discharges associated with motor operation.—RCW
7,800,979
43.80.Vj BEAMFORMING METHOD AND
APPARATUS USED IN ULTRASONIC IMAGING
SYSTEM
Qinjun Hu et al., assignors to Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical
Electronics Company, Limited
21 September 2010 (Class 367/138); filed in China 2 August 2006
Ultrasound echo signals are amplified, converted to digital
form, and stored in a memory. Apodization parameters are calculated
using the echo data and beamforming is performed using the apod-
ization parameters. The implementation conserves memory require-
ments.—RCW
7,803,115
43.80.Vj METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MULTIPLE
TRANSMIT CONTRAST IMAGING
Lihong Pan et al., assignors to General Electric Company
28 September 2010 (Class 600/447); filed 16 July 2007
The nonlinear response from a region of interest is measured by
transmitting two signals into the region. The second signal has a lower
amplitude than the first signal. The difference between the response to the
first signal and the response to the second signal is used to determine non-
linear response in the region and a representation of the nonlinear
response is displayed.—RCW
7,803,116
43.80.Vj TRANSCUTANEOUS LOCALIZATION OF
ARTERIAL BLEEDING BY TWO-DIMENSIONAL
ULTRASONIC IMAGING OF TISSUE VIBRATIONS
Siddhartha Sikdar et al., assignors to University of Washington
through its Center for Commericalization
28 September 2010 (Class 600/462); filed 1 October 2004
A clutter signal, normally suppressed in conventional Doppler flow,
is employed to detect and describe local tissue vibrations produced by
bleeding in the imaged region. Using a tissue vibration image, the origin
1674 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1674
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
and extent of vibrations relative to the underlying anatomy and blood flow
are visualized in real time to enable measurements of vibration amplitude,
frequency, and spatial distribution that are used to determine the rate of
bleeding.—RCW
7,804,595
43.80.Vj USING OPTICAL SCATTERING TO
MEASURE PROPERTIES OF ULTRASOUND
CONTRAST AGENT SHELLS
Thomas Matula and Jingfeng Guan, assignors to University of
Washington
28 September 2010 (Class 356/338); filed 14 September 2006
A laser is used to illuminate one or more ultrasound contrast agent
bubbles in a volume. Pulses of imaging or therapeutic ultrasound are used
to vary the pressure on the ultrasound contrast agent while optical scatter-
ing data are collected and processed to obtain bubble radius as a function
of time. The radius-time relation is fit to a dynamic model and used to
determine parameters such as the shear modulus and shell viscosity of the
bubbles.—RCW
7,806,826
43.80.Vj METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
ELIMINATING ABNORMAL BLOOD FLOW
VELOCITIES IN A COLOR FLOW IMAGE
Yongqiang Dong, assignor to Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical
Electronics Company, Limited
5 October 2010 (Class 600/454); filed in China 29 September 2005
Echo signals received from flowing blood are processed to obtain ve-
locity signs in real time. A weighted smoothing of the signs is used to
determine the direction of blood flow. The method permits reduction of
errors caused by system noise, clutter residue, and speckle effects.—RCW
7,806,829
43.80.Vj SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR NAVIGATING
AN ULTRASOUND CATHETER TO IMAGE A
BEATING HEART
John A. Hauck, assignor to St. Jude Medical, Atrial Fibrillation
Division, Incorporated
5 October 2010 (Class 600/466); filed 27 January 2005
The navigation of a catheter in a heart is imaged using ultrasound.
From the ultrasound data, a model of the heart is constructed. The model
is used to render a region of the heart along with the position of the
region in the heart.—RCW
1675 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 3, March 2011 1675
Redistribution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/content/terms. Download to IP: 129.8.222.98 On: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:41:43
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.