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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of a mixed exercise program, including Greek traditional dances and upper body training, in physical function, strength and psychological condition of breast cancer survivors. Twenty-seven women (N = 27), who had been diagnosed and surgically treated for breast cancer, volunteered to participate in this study. The experimental group consisted of 14 women with mean age 56.6 (4.2) years. They attended supervised Greek traditional dance courses and upper body training (1 h, 3 sessions/week) for 24 weeks. The control group consisted of 13 sedentary women with mean age 57.1 (4.1) years. Blood pressure, heart rate, physical function (6-min walking test), handgrip strength, arm volume and psychological condition (Life Satisfaction Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory) were evaluated before and after the exercise program. The results showed significant increases of 19.9% for physical function, 24.3% for right handgrip strength, 26.1% for left handgrip strength, 36.3% for life satisfaction and also a decrease of 35% for depressive symptoms in the experimental group after the training program. Significant reductions of 9% for left hand and 13.7% for right hand arm volume were also found in the experimental group. Consequently, aerobic exercise with Greek traditional dances and upper body training could be an alternative choice of physical activity for breast cancer survivors, thus promoting benefits in physical function, strength and psychological condition.

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... As a method of treatment, dance/movement therapy (DMT) belongs to the category of complimentary or alternative medicine [1]. Since dance is a type of physical activity, some authors have proposed that it should be used as an additional therapy for women with breast cancer to achieve some health benefits [2,3]. DMT explores awareness, expression, and acceptance of the body, which can improve physical, emotional, and cognitive integration [4]. ...
... e interventional experimental studies about the impact of DMT were conducted in various countries and continents: in Europe from Greece and Portugal [2,3]; in Asia two from Hong Kong, but they were done by the same team in different years [18,19]; in North America two from the USA [20,21]; and in South America from Brazil [3], see Table 1. ...
... e sessions were conducted in small groups or privately. e duration of the programme differed from 3 weeks [18,19] to 24 weeks [2], with the most used duration being 12 weeks [3,20,21]. ...
Article
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Aim: In this paper, we systematically review the evidence looking at the effect of dance/movement therapy (DMT) and mental health outcomes and quality of life in breast cancer patients. Method: The literature search was done with the databases PubMed (MEDLINE), EBSCO, and Cochrane Central by using the following search words: "dancing/dance/movement therapy," "breast cancer/neoplasms/carcinoma/tumour" or "mammary cancer," "mental health," and "quality of life." Ninety-four articles were found. Only empirical interventional studies (N = 6) were selected for the review: randomised controlled trials (RCT) (n = 5) and non-RCT (n = 1). PRISMA guidelines were used. Results: Data from 6 studies including 385 participants who had been diagnosed with breast cancer, were of an average age of 55.7 years, and had participated in DMT programmes for 3-24 weeks were analysed. In each study, the main outcomes that were measured were quality of life, physical activity, stress, and emotional and social well-being. Different questionnaires were used for the evaluation of outcomes. The mental health of the participants who received DMT intervention improved: they reported a better quality of life and decreased stress, symptoms, and fatigue. Conclusion: We found only six studies for review, and some had a small number of participants. However, our findings indicate that DMT could be successfully used as a complimentary therapy in addition to standard cancer treatment for improving the quality of life and mental health of women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. More research is needed to evaluate the complexity of the impact of complimentary therapies. It is possible that DMT could be more effective if used with other therapies.
... Goodill analysiert die Herausforderungen, welche sich für Tanztherapeut*innen in diesem Bereich stellen und gibt Forschungsempfehlungen. Diese Reviews bilden neben unseren eigenen Rechercheresultaten die Grundlage für die aktuelle Übersichtsarbeit. [7,9,20,22,23,31]), drei zu Evidenzlevel 2 ("klinische Kontrollstudien, quasiexperimentelle Studien; [10,32,36]) und vier zu Evidenzlevel 3 (nur IG; [10,19,29,30]). Die sechs Studien auf Evidenzlevel 1 beinhalten fünf tanztherapeutische Interventionen und eine Tanzintervention (Nutzung von Tanz ohne Psychotherapiehintergrund; [26]), die drei Studien auf Evidenzlevel 2 zwei tanztherapeutische und eine Tanzintervention und die vier Studien auf Evidenzlevel 3 drei tanztherapeutische Interventionen und The Lebed Method (TLM) als Intervention. ...
... Aus den Studien auf Evidenzlevel 1 resultierten Befunde der Stressreduktion und Schmerzreduktion [20], Reduktion von Fatigue [9], Depressionsreduktion [23], eines Anstiegs an physischer und psychischer Lebensqualität [31] sowie der Schulterbeweglichkeit ("shoulder range of motion" [ROM]; [31]), physischer Stärke, Ausdauer und Lebenszufriedenheit [23], während Crane-Okada et al. [7] keine signifikanten Veränderungen fanden. Ho et al. [22] wiesen eine Reduktion des wahrgenommenen Stresses (PSS) nach, jedoch zeigte sich dies nicht auf hormoneller Ebene. ...
... Aus den Studien auf Evidenzlevel 1 resultierten Befunde der Stressreduktion und Schmerzreduktion [20], Reduktion von Fatigue [9], Depressionsreduktion [23], eines Anstiegs an physischer und psychischer Lebensqualität [31] sowie der Schulterbeweglichkeit ("shoulder range of motion" [ROM]; [31]), physischer Stärke, Ausdauer und Lebenszufriedenheit [23], während Crane-Okada et al. [7] keine signifikanten Veränderungen fanden. Ho et al. [22] wiesen eine Reduktion des wahrgenommenen Stresses (PSS) nach, jedoch zeigte sich dies nicht auf hormoneller Ebene. ...
Article
This article provides an overview of the state of research in dance and movement therapy (DMT) for people with cancer. Dance movement therapy is a therapy at the interface of movement, art, and psychotherapy. As a creative arts therapy it addresses aesthetic and holistic aspects (e.g. experience of beauty in movement, experience of body–mind unity) in addition to the factors of movement. This current overview is based on search results of English and German sources from 1960 to March 2020. The majority of the available studies were conducted with women with breast cancer. The results provide partly encouraging evidence-based findings. However, they are not conclusive yet due to the insufficient database. The field needs more primary studies with rigorous evidence-based designs and replicable study protocols, mechanism studies, qualitative syntheses, process evaluations, and participatory studies which describe expectations, goals and therapeutic factors from the clients’ perspective.
... Dance accompanied by music promotes movements with awareness of the body's rhythms [22]. Belly dance specifically is directed only for women and is considered a form of exercise that associates body and mind through body movements involving especially the upper limbs and performed to the sound of traditional Arabic music [23,24]. ...
... There are several studies in the literature involving the effects of dance in patients with breast cancer [15,17,22,26,[28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, published protocols for this population have not been identified; only two of these studies are characterized as randomized controlled trials [22,33]. ...
... There are several studies in the literature involving the effects of dance in patients with breast cancer [15,17,22,26,[28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, published protocols for this population have not been identified; only two of these studies are characterized as randomized controlled trials [22,33]. The modalities investigated included specific dance therapy methods [15,17,[28][29][30]33], classical ballet and jazz [31], traditional Greek dance associated with muscular strength training of the upper limbs [22], and the practice of circular dance [32] and ballroom dance for couples [33]. ...
Preprint
Background: Breast cancer is a global public health issue and the side effects of the clinical treatment can decline the quality of life of these women. Therefore, a healthy lifestyle is essential to minimize the physical and psychological side effects of treatment. Physical activity has several benefits for breast cancer women and Pilates solo and belly dance can be an enjoyable type of physical activity for breast cancer women undergoing clinical treatment. The purpose of the study will be to provide a Pilates solo and a belly dance protocol (3x/16 weeks) for women undergoing breast cancer treatment and compare its effects with the control group. Methods: The participants will be allocated to either the intervention arm (Pilates solo or belly dance classes 3x/week for 16 weeks) or a control group (receipt of a booklet on physical activity for breast cancer patients and maintenance of habitual physical activity routine). The Pilates solo and belly dance classes will be divided into three stages: warm-up and stretching; the main stage and relaxation. Measurements of study outcomes will take place at baseline, post-intervention, 6-, 12- and 24-months (maintenance period). The data collection for both groups will occur with a questionnaire application and tests, covering general and clinical information, primary outcome will be quality of life (EORT QLQ C30 and BR23), secondary outcomes will be physical aspects as cardiorespiratory fitness (6-minute walk test and cycle ergometer), lymphedema (sum of arm circumference), physical activity (IPAQ short version), disabilities of the arm (DASH), range of motion (goniometer test), strength (dynamometer test) and flexibility (sit and reach test) and psychological aspects as depressive symptoms (BECK Inventory), body image (Body Image After Breast Cancer Questionnaire), self-esteem (Rosenberg), fatigue (FACT-F), pain (VAS), sexual function (FSFI) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Discussion: In view of the high prevalence of breast cancer among women, the implementation a specific protocol of Pilates solo and belly dance for patients with breast cancer is important considering the needs to improve the quality of life, physical and psychological aspects of their life. Pilates solo and belly dance are two kinds of physical activity that involves mental and body concentration, music, upper limb movements, femininity, and social involvement. An intervention with these two physical activities could offer a choice of supportive care to breast cancer women undergoing treatment to improve quality of life, physical and psychological aspects. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03194997 (registration date: 12 August 2017). Universal Trial Number (World Health Organization): U1111-1195-1623. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03194997
... Dance accompanied by music promotes movements with awareness of the body's rhythms [22]. Belly dance specifically is directed only for women and is considered a form of exercise that associates body and mind through body movements involving especially the upper limbs and performed to the sound of traditional Arabic music [23,24]. ...
... There are several studies in the literature involving the effects of dance in patients with breast cancer [15,17,22,26,[28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, published protocols for this population have not been identified; only two of these studies are characterized as randomized controlled trials [22,33]. ...
... There are several studies in the literature involving the effects of dance in patients with breast cancer [15,17,22,26,[28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, published protocols for this population have not been identified; only two of these studies are characterized as randomized controlled trials [22,33]. The modalities investigated included specific dance therapy methods [15,17,[28][29][30]33], classical ballet and jazz [31], traditional Greek dance associated with muscular strength training of the upper limbs [22], and the practice of circular dance [32] and ballroom dance for couples [33]. ...
Preprint
Background: Breast cancer is a global public health issue and the side effects of the clinical treatment can decline the quality of life of these women. Therefore, a healthy lifestyle is essential to minimize the physical and psychological side effects of treatment. Physical activity has several benefits for breast cancer women and Pilates solo and belly dance can be an enjoyable type of physical activity for breast cancer women undergoing clinical treatment. The purpose of the study will be to provide a Pilates solo and a belly dance protocol (3x/16 weeks) for women undergoing breast cancer treatment and compare its effects with the control group. Methods: The participants will be allocated to either the intervention arm (Pilates solo or belly dance classes 3x/week for 16 weeks) or a control group (receipt of a booklet on physical activity for breast cancer patients and maintenance of habitual physical activity routine). The Pilates solo and belly dance classes will be divided into three stages: warm-up and stretching; the main stage and relaxation. Measurements of study outcomes will take place at baseline, post-intervention, 6-, 12- and 24-months (maintenance period). The data collection for both groups will occur with a questionnaire application and tests, covering general and clinical information, primary outcome will be quality of life (EORT QLQ C30 and BR23), secondary outcomes will be physical aspects as cardiorespiratory fitness (6-minute walk test and cycle ergometer), lymphedema (sum of arm circumference), physical activity (IPAQ short version), disabilities of the arm (DASH), range of motion (goniometer test), strength (dynamometer test) and flexibility (sit and reach test) and psychological aspects as depressive symptoms (BECK Inventory), body image (Body Image After Breast Cancer Questionnaire), self-esteem (Rosenberg), fatigue (FACT-F), pain (VAS), sexual function (FSFI) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Discussion: In view of the high prevalence of breast cancer among women, the implementation a specific protocol of Pilates solo and belly dance for patients with breast cancer is important considering the needs to improve the quality of life, physical and psychological aspects of their life. Pilates solo and belly dance are two kinds of physical activity that involves mental and body concentration, music, upper limb movements, femininity, and social involvement. An intervention with these two physical activities could offer a choice of supportive care to breast cancer women undergoing treatment to improve quality of life, physical and psychological aspects. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03194997 (registration date: 12 August 2017). Universal Trial Number (World Health Organization): U1111-1195-1623. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03194997
... Dance accompanied by music promotes movements with awareness of the body's rhythms [22]. Belly dance specifically is directed only for women and is considered a form of exercise that associates body and mind through body movements involving especially the upper limbs and performed to the sound of traditional Arabic music [23,24]. ...
... There are several studies in the literature involving the effects of dance in patients with breast cancer [15,17,22,26,[28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, published protocols for this population have not been identified; only two of these studies are characterized as randomized controlled trials [22,33]. ...
... There are several studies in the literature involving the effects of dance in patients with breast cancer [15,17,22,26,[28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, published protocols for this population have not been identified; only two of these studies are characterized as randomized controlled trials [22,33]. The modalities investigated included specific dance therapy methods [15,17,[28][29][30]33], classical ballet and jazz [31], traditional Greek dance associated with muscular strength training of the upper limbs [22], and the practice of circular dance [32] and ballroom dance for couples [33]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Breast cancer is a global public health issue. The side effects of the clinical treatment can decrease the quality of life of these women. Therefore, a healthy lifestyle is essential to minimize the physical and psychological side effects of treatment. Physical activity has several benefits for women with breast cancer, and Pilates solo and belly dancing can be an enjoyable type of physical activity for women with breast cancer undergoing clinical treatment. The purpose of this study is to provide a Pilates solo and a belly dance protocol (three times per week/16 weeks) for women undergoing breast cancer treatment and compare its effectiveness with that in the control group. Methods: The participants will be allocated to either the intervention arm (Pilates solo or belly dance classes three times per week for 16 weeks) or a control group (receipt of a booklet on physical activity for patients with breast cancer and maintenance of habitual physical activity routine). The Pilates solo and belly dance classes will be divided into three stages: warmup and stretching, the main stage, and relaxation. Measurements of the study outcomes will take place at baseline; postintervention; and 6, 12, and 24 months after the end of the intervention (maintenance period). The data collection for both groups will occur with a paper questionnaire and tests covering general and clinical information. The primary outcome will be quality of life (EORT QLQ-C30 and EORT QLQ-BR23), and secondary outcomes will be physical aspects such as cardiorespiratory fitness (6-min walk test and cycle ergometer), lymphedema (sum of arm circumference), physical activity (IPAQ short version), disabilities of the arm (DASH), range of motion (goniometer test), muscular strength (dynamometer test) and flexibility (sit and reach test), and psychological aspects such as depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), body image (Body Image After Breast Cancer Questionnaire), self-esteem (Rosenberg), fatigue (FACT-F), pain (VAS), sexual function (FSFI), and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Discussion: In view of the high prevalence of breast cancer among women, the implementation of a specific protocol of Pilates solo and belly dancing for patients with breast cancer is important, considering the necessity to improve their physical and psychological quality of life. Pilates solo and belly dancing are two types of physical activity that involve mental and physical concentration, music, upper limb movements, femininity, and social involvement. An intervention with these two physical activities could offer options of supportive care to women with breast cancer undergoing treatment, with the aim being to improve physical and psychological quality of life. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03194997. Registration date 12 August 2017. Universal Trial Number (World Health Organization), U1111-1195-1623.
... The results of the articles were described in Table 2. Research variables were categorized into psychological and physical in all included studies [23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33] , but investigation on both physical and physiological variables were identified only in four studies [23][24][25][26] . ...
... The results of the articles were described in Table 2. Research variables were categorized into psychological and physical in all included studies [23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33] , but investigation on both physical and physiological variables were identified only in four studies [23][24][25][26] . ...
... In relation to psychological aspects only, all 11 studies investigated these variables. Favorable results were found for social functioning (p = 0.040), mental health (p = 0.040) and role emotional (p = 0.070) 26 , welfare aspect and mood (p < 0.050) 29 quality of life on psychological (p = 0.001) and environment (p = 0.029) 25 , general quality of life (p < 0.050), body image (p < 0.010) 31 , improvements in satisfaction with life (p = 0.001) and also a reduction in depressive symptoms (p = 0.010) 24 , fear of recurrence (p = 0.020) 28 , perceived stress (p < 0.050), pain severity and pain interference (p < 0.050) 30 , mental component of quality of life (p = 0.001), vitality (p = 0.004), social functioning (p = 0.040), and mental health (p = 0.040) 26 . ...
Article
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This systematic review aimed to identify and analyse articles which investigated the influence of dance as adjuvant therapy in breast cancer. The selected databases were PsycInfo, PubMed, The Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect and the Virtual Health Library (VHL). The following descriptors were considered for the selection of articles: [dance therapy] OR [movement therapy] OR [complementary therapies] AND [breast cancer] OR [cancer neoplasms] OR [breast tumor] OR [breast carcinoma] present in the titles or abstracts of the articles. The quality of the data was evaluated by means of the methodological criteria proposed by Downs and Black. Eleven articles were found. The approach followed in methodologies were dance therapy movement, Greek dance, Sacred dance, ballroom dance, classical ballet and jazz. Favorable results were found for self-image, femininity, mood, self-esteem, physical well-being, perceived stress, pain, consciousness, depression, couples trust, anxiety and fear. It was observed better range of motion and strength in upper limp, and also improvement in functional capacity. The authors pointed dance as an effective alternative adjuvant treatment in breast cancer. Dance promotes psychological benefits in women in breast cancer, as well as improvements in upper limbs. Future studies are recommended with best scientific evidence, in order to investigate interventions with dance during other treatment and disease stage and with other forms of dance.
... Dance, as a type of physical activity, can be an option for women with breast cancer to achieve some benefits (Kaltsatou et al. 2011;Sandel et al. 2005). This kind of activity explores awareness, expression, and acceptance of the body, which can improve physical, emotional, and cognitive integration (Dibbell-Hope 2000). ...
... The literature presents some previous studies that investigated the effect of dance programs on women diagnosed with breast cancer, with different methodologies: such as dance therapies (Sandel et al. 2005; Dibbell-Hope 2000; Serlin et al. 2000;Crane-Okada et al. 2012), Greek traditional dance (Kaltsatou et al. 2011), classical ballet and jazz (Molinaro 1986) and sacred dance (Frison 2014). ...
... Considering those characteristics, the findings related to reduction of upper-limb symptoms after the intervention are justified, given that the activity is composed of movements in all axes of the shoulder, in different amplitudes. This same response is found in studies that analysed other dance modalities (Kaltsatou et al. 2011;Sandel et al. 2005;Crane-Okada et al. 2012). The study by Kaltsatou et al. (2011) investigated upper limbs through handgrip strength, which was M A N U S C R I P T ...
Article
Objective To analyse the influence of belly dance on the quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer. Methods Pilot study, with a design of non-randomised clinical trial study, analysing 19 women, with 8 allocated in the experimental group and 11 in the control group. The experimental group underwent 12 weeks of belly dance classes, with a frequency of twice a week and duration of 60 min for each lesson. Data collection was made through the use of questionnaires containing general information, quality of life (EORTC QLQ-BR23), fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale) and depressive symptoms (BECK's Depression Inventory) applied on baseline and after intervention. Results The experimental group presented significant improvements after the intervention, with an increase in scores of the functional scale (p = 0.002): body image (p = 0.037) and sexual function (p = 0.027); and a decrease in scores of the symptomatic scale (p = 0.001): systemic therapy side effects (p = 0.005) and arm symptoms (p = 0.001) of quality of life, as well the decrease of fatigue (p = 0.036) and depressive symptoms (p = 0.002). No significant differences were observed in clinical and demographic information at baseline between the experimental and control groups. Also, there was no significant difference on quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms between the two groups. Conclusion Belly dance can be a viable form of physical activity for women with breast cancer. It was associated with benefits for quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms. Even though there were significant pre–post treatment differences, there was no significance difference between the experimental and control group; and therefore, treatment could have been due to natural history.
... In this perspective, physical exercises and art forms are interesting non-pharmacological adjuvant therapies for cancer survivors (Silva et al., 2020;Dos Santos et al., 2017;Koom et al., 2016). Different dance modalities, such as Dance Movement Therapy (Vardhan et al., 2022;Tortora, 2019;Goodill, 2018;Ho et al., 2016), Ballroom Dancing (Pisu et al., 2017), Greek Tradicional Dance (Kaltsatou et al., 2011) and belly dance (Boing et al., 2018;Szalai et al., 2017), positively impact cancer survivors' lives, improve their social skills, and decrease cancer pain and depressive processes (Cruz et al., 2022). ...
... Therefore, our results indicate that dance is an effective non-pharmacological methodology for improving the QoL of elderly female cancer survivors. These findings are corroborated by other studies that evaluated QoL improvement related to dance, which acts as an effective adjuvant technique (Pisu et al., 2017;Szalai et al., 2017;Kaltsatou et al., 2011;Boing et al., 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to investigate the impact of dance as a non-pharmacological adjuvant therapy on the quality of life (QoL), pain sensation, and depression of female cancer survivors. Method: We conducted a parallel, open-label, randomized, controlled clinical trial where cancer patients were invited to experience dance as a language. The intervention comprised two dance group classes per week for 20 weeks involving creative dance processes and light to moderate physical exercises. The participants were randomized into two groups – control (did not undergo the dance classes) and intervention (underwent the dance classes) – and answered questionnaires before, during, and after the intervention. We assessed the QoL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General), pain perception (Visual Analog Scale and McGill Pain Questionnaire), and depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). Results: The statistical data analyses revealed that the intervention and control groups did not present statistical differences in age, cancer type, stage of disease, surgical treatment, and scapular and pelvic involvement. The results showed an improvement in the intervention group’s QoL regarding the affective, miscellaneous, sensory, and total dimensions and decreased pain perception and depression. Conclusion: This clinical trial presented dance as a complementary non-pharmacological adjunct therapy for cancer survivors' treatment, improving quality of life and decreasing pain perception and depressive processes. Implications for cancer survivors: The practice of dance as a language is a valid intervention to help female cancer survivors face the disease's physical and psychosocial effects.
... However, there was no significant influence of DMT on anxiety, depression, fatigue levels, sleep disturbance, and life quality. These results are in contrast with those from other studies (Kaltsatou et al., 2011;Pisu et al., 2017;Sturm et al., 2014;Szalai et al., 2017). On the other hand, it is relevant to state that these reports did not employ similar dance modalities. ...
... Dance offers an exceptional opportunity for studying the human brain's plasticity and human-behavior interface (Karpati et al., 2015). Additionally, a randomized clinical trial performed in Greece demonstrated that patients with breast cancer that practiced traditional dance for 24 weeks had better physical functions, fewer depression symptoms, and higher satisfaction with life (Kaltsatou et al., 2011). An American pilot randomized clinical trial showed that 12-week interventions with saloon dance improved cancer patients' active behavior and quality of life with their partners (Pisu et al., 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity in the globe, with more than half of patients reporting pain as a result of the disease. By reducing cancer-related pain, dance has the potential to redefine the life of patients independently of their cure prognosis. This review investigated the benefits of dance as adjuvant, non-pharmacological therapy for cancer treatment. To identify studies related to this topic, we searched the Cochrane Library, PUBMED, Scielo, BVS, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases. However, we found few published systematic reports investigating the effects of dance in cancer treatment. The numbers are even smaller when we considered the relationship between dance and cancer pain. Although there is a small number of publications on this theme, we reviewed studies that indicate that there is a positive relationship between dance practice and cancer pain management. Moreover, we found that the decline of pain contributed to the better life quality of patients with cancer. We concluded that dance is a physical practice that may improve patients’ quality of life. Regarding the estimations of cancer diagnosis and pain during disease development and therapy, it is fundamental new studies and clinical trials that integrate dance as adjuvant therapy for improving cancer pain and patient’s life quality.
... If dance activities are well-structured, in terms of intensity, duration, and frequency, evidence shows that dance improves physical and psychosocial outcomes amongst breast cancer patients. Boing et al. (2017) in their systematic review of studies on dance for breast cancer, have argued that ballroom (Pisu et al., 2017), Greek folk (Kaltsatou et al., 2011), ballet and jazz (Molinaro et al., 1986), mindful movement (Crane-Okada et al., 2012), and sacred dance (Frison et al., 2014) have all led to both physical (increased range of motion and strength in upper limb and functional capacity) as well as psychosocial improvements (quality of life, self-image, femininity, mood, selfesteem, consciousness, and perceived physical well-being). They can also contribute to the reduction of psychological concerns (stress, pain, depression, anxiety and fear). ...
... This was a particularly promising result since strong handgrip is a positive prognostic indicator for reduced mortality and overall health post hospitalization and surgery (Bohannon, 2008). Such findings echo work by Kaltsatou et al. (2011) on Greek group dance reporting similar positive changes. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Women's health has received renewed attention in the last few years including health rehabilitation options for women affected by breast cancer. Dancing has often been regarded as one attractive option for supporting women's well-being and health, but research with women recovering from breast cancer is still in its infancy. Dancing with Health is multi-site pilot study that aimed to evaluate a dance programme for women in recovery from breast cancer across five European countries. Methods: A standardized 32 h dance protocol introduced a range of Latin American dances presented within a sports and exercise framework with influences from dance movement therapy. Fifty-four women (M age 53.51; SD 7.99) participated in the study who had a breast cancer diagnosis <3 years, chemotherapy >6 weeks, no indication of metastasis, or scheduled surgery/chemotherapy/radiation treatment for the duration of the intervention. Primary outcome data was collected for anthropometric and fitness measures next to cancer-related quality of life. T -tests and Wilcoxon signed ranked tests were used to establish differences pre and post intervention. Cohen's d was also calculated to determine the effect size of the intervention. Results: Statistically significant changes were found for: (i) weight, right and left forearm circumference and hip; (ii) 6 min walking, right and left handgrip, sit-to-stand and sit-and-reach; (iii) the EORTC-QLQ C30 summary score as well as the subscales of emotional and social functioning and symptoms. In all cases the direction of change was positive, while Cohen's d calculated showed that the effect of the intervention for these parameters ranged from intermediate to large. Conclusion: Changes on the above anthropometric, fitness and quality of life measures suggest that the intervention was of value to the participating women recovering from breast cancer. Results also advocate collaborative efforts across countries to further research.
... Also, physical activities improve social functioning and relationships with others [32,33], as well as better family well-being [34]. In addition, physical activities promote improved life satisfaction [34,35] and the level of self-efficacy of patients, that is to say the judgment of their ability to succeed in initiating and maintaining a change, has also been improved [36]. These benefits are more evident when the activity is practiced in a group. ...
Article
Full-text available
Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in women. Several studies have shown the benefits of physical activity (PA) before and after treatment on the physical and psychological components of patients. Almost all of the studies mentioned are carried out on non-African patients over the age of 40. And no experimental studies have been carried out in young patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer. This is how we asked ourselves the question of whether a physical exercise program carried out on young Beninese women under the age of 30 undergoing treatment for breast cancer at the Saint Nicolas clinic in Porto-Novo could it have the same effects on their physical and psychological components? Our objective through this research is to study the potential effect of a physical activity program on the physical and psychological state in women under 30 years old (27±5.8 years) undergoing treatment for a breast cancer at the Saint Nicolas clinic in Porto-Novo. An experimental study was then carried out with 13 patients (very low rate of women in this section suffering from breast cancer) undergoing treatment throughout 2022 at the Saint Nicolas clinic in Porto-Novo. The experimental group followed a physical activity program consisting of aerobic and muscular exercises; over a period of 8 weeks. According to the data collected and the feedback from the patients, the physical activity program seems to have been beneficial for most of them. There is an improvement in the quality of life and the physical condition of the patients. In addition, the management of physical fatigue and psychological fatigue also seem to improve. There was also a marked improvement in the ability to concentrate and self-esteem. The physical activity program has improved the physical and psychological state of Beninese women with breast cancer
... Previous trials among breast cancer survivors have shown positive effects of Pilates on fatigue [18], depressive symptoms [19], and pain [20]. Studies have demonstrated effects of different dance modalities on depressive symptoms [21], stress and pain [22]. Our research group has previously demonstrated the safety of belly dance interventions for breast cancer survivors in two pilot studies [23,24], which suggested positive improvements in quality of life, body image, depressive symptoms and fatigue. ...
Article
Background Breast cancer treatment leads to several side effects. Exercise can help to reduce these side effects. However, it is unknown whether a mat Pilates or a belly dance intervention can improve the patient-reported outcomes of these women. Objective Examine the effects of a 16-week exercise intervention (mat Pilates or belly dance) on patient reported outcomes (PROs) among breast cancer survivors, at 16 weeks, six months, and 12 months; and investigate sociodemographic and clinical predictors of intervention adherence. Methods Seventy-four breast cancer survivors who were receiving hormone therapy were randomly allocated into mat Pilates (n = 25), belly dance (n = 25) or control group (educational sessions) (n = 24). Mat Pilates and belly dance groups received a 16-week intervention, delivered three days a week and 60 minutes a session. The control group received three education sessions and continue usual care. The patient reported outcomes assessed were depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), optimism (Life Orientation Test), fatigue (FACT-F), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and pain (VAS), clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, and habitual physical activity (IPAQ short). Results All three groups showed a significant improvement in fatigue, and this effect was maintained during follow-up. No significant effects were found for depressive symptoms, optimism, stress, or pain. A history of exercise prior to breast cancer and be inactive after diagnosis were significant predictors of adherence to interventions. Conclusion Mat Pilates, belly dance and a few educational sessions can be effective in improving fatigue after 16 weeks of intervention. Registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03194997).
... Vicario y Chambliss (2001) indican que la danza puede facilitar el acondicionamiento físico y aeróbico, así como facilitar la expresión emocional en mujeres jóvenes. De igual manera, la práctica de diversas actividades físicas, entre ellas la danza tradicional griega realizada por sobrevivientes de cáncer de seno, tuvo como beneficios un incremento en las funciones físicas, la satisfacción por la vida y una disminución de los síntomas depresivos (Kaltsatou et al., 2011). En otro estudio, la aplicación de 6 meses de clases de danza (1 h/semana) en un grupo de ancianos saludables, reportó efectos beneficiosos en la postura, tiempo de reacción, funciones cognitivas y motoras, y el bienestar subjetivo (Kattenstroth et al., 2013). ...
Article
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La educación formal pretende la transmisión de conocimientos, valores y habilidades a los alumnos, en un contexto social e individual donde se pueden presentar problemas que afectan al proceso formativo, como el sedentarismo, el estrés, la falta de relaciones sociales y el compromiso por el estudio. Dado que la práctica regular de la danza mejora el bienestar general de las personas, el objetivo de esta revisión sistemática es conocer cómo se aplica esta actividad en el contexto educativo y que beneficios reporta. Se empleo la metodología PRISMA para realizar la revisión. Se consultaron las bases de datos Pub Med, Science Direct y Web of Science, empleando las palabras clave “dance, school, college, students”, entre los años 2012-2021- Después de aplicar los criterios de inclusión/exclusión, se seleccionaron 11 artículos para un análisis completo. La danza se aplica en forma de programas extracurriculares, con una o más sesiones de entre 60 min a 90 min por semana, para mejorar el bienestar físico, emocional y las relaciones sociales de los alumnos. Para el caso de los estudiantes universitarios, la práctica de la danza mejora los indicadores de estrés y depresión. La aplicación de la danza en el contexto educativo, puede contribuir con la formación integral de los alumnos en un entorno agradable, que puede maximizar la experiencia del aprendizaje.
... A Greek traditional dance program was practiced for 24 weeks in the study conducted with women with 27 breast cancer survivors. In the study, it was found that dance could be an alternative physical activity option for breast cancer survivors and could provide significant improvements in strength, physical function, and mood [76]. In the study of Argiriadou et al. [77], a Greek traditional dance program was practiced by middle-aged women. ...
Chapter
Health and art disciplines have worked in cooperation for the development of health from past to present. Today’s understanding of health requires the integration of concepts, such as creative thinking, intuitive and aesthetic knowledge, spiritual awareness, integration, and maturation, which are extremely important in the development of health. The examination of the process of making and creating art and the development of aesthetic sensations that occur at the end of this process play an important role in both the development of health, the growth and maturation of the individual, and the recovery and repair of illness. Art activities not only support holistic health but also act as a source of motivation for well-being. The inclusion of art in health care services has positive effects on society from the more broad perspective of health professionals, patients, and their families. In this review, the relationship between art and health, which is as old as human history, is discussed in line with the literature review, and the dimension of art in improving health is examined. In addition, in line with the studies carried out, the effects of art therapy on individuals with health problems and art therapy methods are discussed.
... It is generally well documented that physical exercise enhances the quality of life of cancer patients [44] and has positive effects on physiology, body composition, physical functions, and psychology after breast cancer treatment [45]. Similar positive effects had a recent study with Greek traditional dances used as aerobic exercise together with upper body training on cancer survivors and is suggested as an alternative choice of physical activity [46]. ...
Article
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The present study is a Dance Movement Psychotherapy (DMP) pilot intervention designed to address the psychological challenges faced by Greek breast cancer patients, after surgery and around radiotherapy treatment. It was designed as a 12 weeks’ project, involving patients of diverse age and educational level, mostly living in rural areas. The personality and psychopathology inventory Symptoms’ Check List-90 (SCL-90), the therapist’s records and video self-observation were used in a mixed method approach. Thirteen subjects initiated the study, but they were gradually reduced and only four completed it. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS-25 addressing this fact. Positive results of qualitative interpretation of the therapist’s data and SCL-90, as well as changes in movement patterns and self-perception evaluated via video self-observation, showed that the intervention was beneficial for the patients who completed it. However, the fact that not all the participants were able to finish the program, implies that although DMT intervention at an early stage can help some patients deal with strong emotions, careful evaluation of eligible individuals should precede. Besides the patients’ medical condition, demographic and personality characteristics should be considered in the design of future similar studies.
... Thirty studies were RCTs, and were 13 single-arm trials. The studies were conducted across breast [228][229][230][231][232][233][234] (n=6), lung [235][236][237][238][239][240][241][242][243][244] (n=10), prostate [245][246][247][248][249][250][251][252][253] (n=9), colorectal 254,255 (n=2), head and neck [256][257][258] (n=3), hematologic [259][260][261][262] (n=4), brain and CNS 263,264 (n=2), esophagogastric 265 (n=1), and other various types of cancer 266-272 (n=6). Studies included a mix of localized and advanced stage populations. ...
Article
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Objective To systematically review the evidence regarding rehabilitation interventions targeting optimal physical or cognitive function in adults with a history of cancer, and describe the breadth of evidence as well as strengths and limitations across a range of functional domains Data Sources PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Scopus, Web of Science, EMBASE. The time scope was January 2008 – April 2019. Study Selection Prospective, controlled trials including single- and multi-arm cohorts investigating rehabilitative interventions for cancer survivors at any point in the continuum of care were included, if studies included a primary functional outcome measure. Secondary data analyses and pilot/feasibility studies were excluded. Full text review identified 362 studies for inclusion. Data Extraction Extraction was performed by co-author teams, and quality and bias assessed using the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Classification of Evidence Scheme (Class I-IV). Data Synthesis Studies for which the functional primary endpoint achieved significance were categorized into 9 functional areas foundational to cancer rehabilitation: 1) quality of life (109 studies); 2) activities of daily living (61 studies); 3) fatigue (59 studies); 4) functional mobility (55 studies); 5) exercise behavior (37 studies); 6) cognition (20 studies); 7) communication (10 studies); 8) sexual function (6 studies); and 9) return to work (5 studies). Most studies were categorized as class III in quality/bias. Averaging results found within each of the functional domains, 71% of studies reported statistically significant results following cancer rehabilitation intervention(s) for at least one functional outcome. Conclusions These findings provide evidence supporting the efficacy of rehabilitative interventions for individuals with a cancer history. The findings should be balanced with the understanding that many studies had moderate risk of bias and/or limitations in study quality by AAN criteria. These results may provide a foundation for future work to establish clinical practice guidelines for rehabilitative interventions across cancer disease types.
... Protocols for randomized controlled trials of dance therapies for breast cancer patients have been published, to investigate different and various aspects. For example, it has been investigated whether dance therapy can relieve symptoms and stress in breast cancer patients, during radiation therapy [22], and whether traditional Greek dance [23] or belly dance [24] shows physical or psychological benefits. Furthermore, a pilot trial of 31 female cancer survivors and their partners examined ballroom dance, to improve their HRQL [25]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background The majority of breast cancer patients suffer from persistent impairments after completion of their primary oncological therapy. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in particular is a multidimensional syndrome having a profound negative impact on the quality of life. To counter CRF symptoms, physical activities are suggested as first-line interventions, mind-body therapies have been shown to be effective, and music therapy can also reduce anxiety and stress in breast cancer patients. Tango therapy that combines various elements can have an impact on physical, psychological, and cognitive abilities and could therefore have a beneficial effect on breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a 6-week tango module is suited as a therapeutic approach for people after primary breast cancer therapy to favorably influence their quality of life, especially CRF levels. Methods Sixty patients with a diagnosis for stage I–III breast cancer 12–48 months before enrollment and with CRF (age > 18) will be recruited and randomized 1:1 to a tango or a waiting-list group. Movement concepts using elements of Argentine tango (self-awareness, musical and spatial perception, self-perception, playfulness, shared experience) will be examined with the participants during six consecutive weekly 1-h tango sessions. The primary outcome will be the improvement of CRF (German version of the Cancer Fatigue Scale), and the secondary outcomes will be the improvement in sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and quality of life (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Patient-reported outcomes will be measured at baseline and 6 weeks later; follow-up will be performed 6, 12, and 24 months after baseline. An evaluation will be performed by means of descriptive data analyses. Discussion Argentine tango, as a music-based movement therapy, can influence different skills and may improve several outcomes. The therapeutic use of Argentine tango in the care of breast cancer patients has not yet been reported. It is anticipated that participants receiving the tango module will have improved CRF, sleep, and quality of life scores compared to a waitlist control. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Registry (DRKS) DRKS00021601 . Retrospectively registered on 21 August 2020
... 10 Η αερόβια άσκηση με ελληνικούς παραδοσιακούς χορούς μπορεί να μειώσει το άγχος και τον πόνο, καθώς και να αυξήσει την κινητικότητα και την αυτοεξυπηρέτηση, αλλά και να επιδράσει θετικά στη γενική κατάσταση υγείας των γυναικών που επιβίωσαν από καρκίνο του μαστού, ενώ σημαντικά οφέλη προκύπτουν για τη φυσική λειτουργία, τη δύναμη και την ψυχολογική τους κατάσταση. 17 Ειδικότερα, σύμφωνα με τη μελέτη ενός παρεμβατικού προγράμματος διδασκαλίας ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών σε γυναίκες που επέζησαν από τον καρκίνο του μαστού αποδείχθηκε ότι συμβάλλει τόσο στη μείωση της κόπωσης, όσο και στη βελτίωση της ποιότητας ζωής τους, που σχετίζεται με την υγεία τους. 18 Σκοπός Ο σκοπός της παρούσας μελέτης ήταν η διερεύνηση της επίδρασης ενός παρεμβατικού προγράμματος διδασκαλίας ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών, στη βελτίωση των επιπέδων της ποιότητας ζωής ασθενών με καρκίνο, είτε αυτοί βρίσκονται σε θεραπευτική αγωγή είτε σε στάδιο παρακολούθησης. ...
Article
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Introduction: Cancer is one of the most serious health problems today and is the second most common cause of death. The consequences of the disease experienced by patients greatly contribute to the reduction of their quality of life. In an effort to maintain a satisfactory level of health, but also to prevent possible future illnesses, exercise, and in particu-lar dance, is potentially a powerful and beneficial tool. Purpose: Study of the effect of a program of Greek traditional dances on the quality of life in cancer patients of all forms regardless of being under or after their treatment. Material and Method: The research program was conducted from January 2017 to November 2019 with the participation of 300 cancer patients from Attica hospitals and non-profit cancer patients' organizations. They were randomly divided into two groups, 150 of them in the experimental group and the remaining 150 in the control group. Participants in the experimental group attended a program of teaching Greek traditional dances with two lessons per week, 60 min each, for 8 weeks, while the control group did not participate in any physical activity. Data collection was performed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 Quality of Life Questionnaire (Greek version 3.0) which assess the quality of life of cancer patients. The statistical analyses used were: a reliability analysis (Cronbach's α) and a Deviation-Dependent Analysis (One-Way Repeated). Results: A statistically significant improvement in all factors of quality of life was found in patients of the experimental group (except that of "Nausea-Vomiting"). Specifically, there was a statistically significant differ-ence in physical function (F=1559.851, p<0.001), role function (F=537.958, p<0.001), emotional function (F=1954.652, p<0.001), and cognitive function (F=1055.667, p<0.001), social function (F=920.005, p<0.001), fatigue (F=2016.463, p<0.001), pain (F=797.666, p<0.001), dyspnea (F=412.962, p<0.001), sleep disturbances (F=542.641, p<0.001), loss of appetite (F=278.861, p<0.001), constipation (F=160.037, p<0.001), diarrhea (F=154.197, p<0.001), financial impact (F=177.628, p<0.001), and overall quality of health (F=1102.049, p<0.001). On the contrary, the results in the control group showed statistically significant differences only in emotional function (F=3.789, p=0.025), cognitive function (F=3.355, p=0.038), and financial impact (F=13.728, p<0.01), and in general health (F=26.615, p<0.001). Conclusions: Participation in a program of Greek traditional dances, a pleasant form of aerobic physical activity, can improve the indicators of quality of life for cancer patients and be part of their necessary psychosocial support.
... The majority of control groups adopted normal daily activities as the usual care (n = 15, 53.6 %) [30,[52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59][60][61][62][63], active control conditions such as other physical activities (n = 5, 17.9 %) [59,[63][64][65][66], music, and other social activities (n = 12, 42.9 %) [30,59,63,65,[67][68][69][70][71][72][73] (Table 1). ...
Article
Objective To examine the effect of dancing interventions on depression symptoms, anxiety, and stress in adults with and without musculoskeletal disorders, and to determine the duration of the effectiveness of a dancing intervention. Methods Five electronic databases, CINAHL, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PsycINFO were searched from January 2010 to March 2021. Data were extracted for a quality synthesis and meta-analysis, and GRADEpro software was used to rate the quality of evidence. Results Twenty-eight randomized controlled trials involving 2249 eligible subjects were selected. They were found to be of satisfactory quality (fair n = 12, good n = 16). These studies revealed that dance interventions had a significant effect on relieving depression symptoms (SMD = −0.69, 95 % CI -0.91 to −0.35, p < 0.001), anxiety (SMD = −0.99, 95 % CI = −1.92 to −0.05, p < 0.05), and stress (SMD = −1.0, 95 % CI = −1.83 to −0.17, p < 0.05). Exposure to a dancing intervention for at least 150 min per week was found to have reduced depression symptoms (SMD = −0.72, 95 % CI -0.20, −0.25, p < 0.01). The quality of evidence ranged from very low to low. Conclusions This review indicates that dancing interventions significantly reduce depression symptoms, stress, and anxiety; and adults with or without musculoskeletal disorders would benefit from engaging in a dancing intervention for at least 150 min per week. Dancing interventions are recommended to be incorporated in health promotion activities to promote psychological wellbeing.
... Hence, dance as a combination of physical activity, music, and mindful elements might be an appropriate and effective approach, to address CRF and to improve HRQL [20]. Protocols for randomized controlled trials of dance therapies for breast cancer patients have been published, e.g. for traditional Greek dance [21], ballroom dance for couples [22], and belly dance [23]. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background The majority of breast cancer patients suffer from persistent impairments after completion of their primary oncological therapy. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in particular is a multidimensional syndrome having a profound negative impact on the quality of life. To counter CRF symptoms, exercise and physical activity are suggested as first-line interventions, mind-body therapies have been shown to be effective, and music therapy can also reduce anxiety and stress in breast cancer patients. Tango therapy that combines various elements may therefore have beneficial effects in breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a 6-week tango module is suited as a therapeutic approach for people after primary breast cancer therapy to favorably influence their quality of life, especially CRF levels. Methods Sixty patients with a diagnosis for stage I-III breast cancer 12-48 months before enrollment and with CRF (age > 18) will be recruited and randomized 1:1 to a tango or a waiting-list group. Movement concepts using elements of Argentine tango (self-awareness, musical and spatial perception, self-perception, playfulness, shared experience) will be examined with the participants during six consecutive weekly one-hour tango sessions. The primary outcome will be the improvement of CRF (German version of the Cancer Fatigue Scale) and the secondary outcomes will be the improvement in sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and quality of life (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Patient reported outcomes will be measured at baseline and six weeks later; follow-up will be performed six, twelve and twenty four months after baseline. An evaluation will be performed by means of descriptive data analyses. Discussion Argentine tango, as a music-based movement therapy, can influence physical, psychological and cognitive skills. The therapeutic use of Argentine tango in the care of breast cancer patients has not yet been reported. It is anticipated that participants receiving the tango module will have improved CRF, sleep and quality of life scores compared to a waitlist control. Trial registration Trial registration number DRKS00021601. Retrospectively registered on 21 August 2020.
... , melhora significativa na contagem de eritrócitos, viscosidade do plasma e hematócrito de mulheres mais velhas59 . melhoras no HDL-C 60 , já, Maruf, Akinpelu e Salako apresentaram modificações positivas no LDL 50 e diminuição da secreção do cortisol basal61 .Neste fator, a dança influenciou, de forma positiva, o aspecto físico 62 , na melhora da função física em sobreviventes de câncer63 . A dança, como item de modificação do funcionamento físico ou fisiológico, aparece como terapia adjunta para a melhora da função física em adultos incapazes31 . ...
Article
A busca pela saúde e longevidade atrai cada vez mais olhares da comunidade científica. Há diversas formas de se conseguir alterações fisiológicas que previnam doenças ou colaborem para modificar estados patológicos já existentes no organismo humano. Atividades diferenciadas como é o caso da dança, tem sido um recurso utilizado na busca da prevenção de doenças e de agravos, devido à proporção terapêutica à ação sistêmica que esta exerce e também do baixo custo comparada com outros recursos de tratamento multidisciplinar. Este artigo trata-se de uma Pesquisa Bibliográfica na modalidade revisão integrativa da literatura, tendo como objetivo conhecer e demonstrar o que vem sendo publicado na comunidade científica sobre o impacto do exercício da dança na fisiologia humana. Como método utilizou-se as bases de dados: PUBMED, SCIELO, LILACS, com os seguintes descritores associados: "dança, alterações fisiológicas e terapia através da dança”, “dança e terapia através da dança” e “dança e alterações fisiológicas”, “alterações fisiológicas e terapia através da dança”, tendo como critérios de inclusão dos de material utilizado: artigos originais, disponíveis na íntegra, publicados nas línguas portuguesa inglesa e espanhola, entre os anos de 2013 a 2018, e que estejam relacionados com as modificações fisiológicas através da dança. Como resultados da busca englobando estas combinações, foram encontrados 2.643 artigos, e destes, foram selecionados para estudo 47 artigos. Conclui-se pelos estudos revisados e organizados no quadro sinóptico, que na relação entre a fisiologia e a dança, há diversas alterações positivas no organismo humano obtidas através da dança, seja como coadjuvante em tratamento, ou seja como fator de prevenção.
... In unserem Review fanden wir 13 Studien nach evidenzbasierten Kriterien, sechs RCT-Studien zur Tanztherapie mit onkologischen Patienten [7,9,20,22,23,31], drei klinische kontrollierte Studien 10 [10, 32, 36] und vier Interventionsstudien ohne Kontrollgruppe [10,19,29,30]. Über dieses Review hinaus finden sich in weiteren Sekundärstudien Befunde zur Tanztherapie mit Angehörigen [34], zur Tangotherapie [27] und zur Kinderonkologie [28,36]. ...
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Zusammenfassung Dieser Artikel bietet eineÜbersicht zum Forschungsstand der Tanz-und Bewegungstherapie ("dance movement therapy", engl. Abk.: DMT) für Menschen mit einer Krebserkrankung. Tanz-und Bewegungstherapie ist eine Therapie an der Schnittstelle von Bewegung, Kunst und Psychotherapie. Als künstlerische Therapie adressiert sie neben den Wirkfaktoren der Bewegung auchästhetische und ganzheitliche Wirkfaktoren wie Schönheitserleben in der eigenen Bewegung und Einheitserleben von Leib und Seele. Dieser aktuellenÜbersicht liegen Ergebnisse einer Recherche der englischen und deutschen Literatur zwischen 1960 und 03/2020. Dieüberwiegende Mehrheit der vorhandenen Studien wurde bei Frauen mit Brustkrebs durchgeführt. Die Resultate liefern zum Teil ermutigende evidenzbasierte Ergebnisse, die jedoch wegen der unzureichenden Datenbasis noch nicht konklusiv sind. Benötigt werden mehr Primärstudien mit rigoroseren evidenzbasierten Designs und replizierbaren Studienprotokollen, Wirkfaktorenstudien, qualitative Synthesen, Prozessevaluationen und stärker partizipatorisch angelegte Studien, die Erwartungen, Ziele und Wirkfaktoren aus Sicht der Klient*innen beschreiben. Abstract This article provides an overview of the state of research in dance and movement therapy (DMT) for people with cancer. Dance movement therapy is a therapy at the interface of movement, art, and psychotherapy. As a creative arts therapy it addresses aesthetic and holistic aspects (e.g. experience of beauty in movement, experience of body-mind unity) in addition to the factors of movement. This current overview is based on search results of English and German sources from 1960 to March 2020. The majority of the available studies were conducted with women with breast cancer. The results provide partly encouraging evidence-based findings. However, they are not conclusive yet due to the insufficient database. The field needs more primary studies with rigorous evidence-based designs and replicable study protocols, mechanism studies, qualitative syntheses, process evaluations, and participatory studies which describe expectations, goals and therapeutic factors from the clients' perspective.
... A study on the health status of women who have survived breast cancer has shown that aerobic exercise in the form of Greek traditional dance can reduce stress and pain as well as increase mobility and self-care. The Greek traditional dance therapy had a positive effect on their physical function, strength, and psychological state, ultimately improving their QOL significantly [28]. The present research is a novel study among a general Greek population of cancer survivors, with two primary objectives as follows: (a) to investigate the contribution of Greek traditional dance to patients' ability to cope with their stress and anxiety, and (b) to evaluate the positive impact of an intervention program of Greek traditional dance on the psychology of cancer survivors, especially with regard to stress and anxiety. ...
Article
Stress and anxiety levels in cancer patients tend to decrease by performing bodily-kinesthetic and musical activities. The hypothesis of the present study is that attending lessons in Greek traditional dance is an effective method for managing anxiety and stress in patients diagnosed with cancer of any type both during and after treatment. The study was conducted on 300 cancer patients (150 experimental subjects, 150 controls) selected by Attica hospitals and nonprofit cancer patients’ organizations. Each patient in the experimental group attended an 8-week Greek traditional dance lesson program. Lessons were held twice per week, lasting 60 min each. A similar group of cancer patients not participating in any organized physical activity during the same time period served as a control group. Data were collected using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (Dass-21) questionnaire and subjected to reliability analysis (Cronbach’s alpha) and deviation-dependent analysis (one-way repeated). Both stress and anxiety values decreased significantly in the experimental group (stress value: initial mean = 16.27, second mean = 2.58, final mean = 6.77, p < 0.001; anxiety value: initial mean = 15.59, second mean = 2.81, final mean = 5.35, p < 0.001). In contrast, no significant fluctuation was observed in the control group. Thus, there was a significant decrease in stress and anxiety values in cancer patients who attended Greek traditional dances lessons with important psychotherapeutic significance.
... Οι ερευνητές υποστήριξαν ότι η αερόβια άσκηση με παραδοσιακούς χορούς και ασκήσεις για το άνω μέρος του σώματος μπορεί να είναι μια εναλλακτική επιλογή σωματικής δραστηριότητας για τις επιζούσες του καρκίνου του μαστού, προωθώντας έτσι τα οφέλη στη φυσική λειτουργία, στη δύναμη και στην ψυχολογική κατάσταση. 21 Ο σκοπός της παρούσας μελέτης ήταν να διερευνήσει αν η συμμετοχή σε ένα πρόγραμμα ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών μπορεί να μειώσει τα επίπεδα κόπωσης γυναικών με καρκίνο του μαστού. Πιο συγκεκριμένα, στόχος της μελέτης ήταν να εξετάσει εάν η συμμετοχή σε ένα πρόγραμμα διδασκαλίας ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών θα μπορούσε να μειώσει τα επίπεδα κόπωσης που αισθάνονται οι γυναίκες οι οποίες όχι μόνο διαγνώστηκαν με καρκίνο του μαστού αλλά έχουν υποστεί χειρουργική επέμβαση, μαστεκτομή και χημειοθεραπεία. ...
Research
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30 γυναίκες με χρόνο επιβίωσης 4 (±3) έτη μετά το τέλος της θεραπευτικής τους αγωγής, η οποία επί πλέον της μαστεκτομής περιλάμβανε ακτινοβολίες και χημειοθεραπεία. Οι 20 από αυτές αποτέλεσαν την πειραματική ομάδα και οι 10 την ομάδα ελέγχου. Η πειραματική ομάδα παρακολούθησε ένα τριμηνιαίο πρόγραμμα διδασκαλίας ελληνικών χορών με συχνότητα τρία μαθήματα την εβδομάδα, διάρκειας 50 min το καθένα, ενώ η ομάδα ελέγχου δεν συμμετείχε σε κάποια φυσική δραστηριότητα. Η συλλογή των δεδο-μένων πραγματοποιήθηκε με τη χρήση του ερωτηματολογίου «ελληνικό πολυδιάστατο ερωτηματολόγιο κόπωσης». Οι στατιστικές αναλύσεις που εφαρμόστηκαν ήταν: ανάλυση αξιοπιστίας (α του Cronbach) και ανάλυση διακύμανσης επαναλαμβανόμενων μετρήσεων. ΑΠΟΤΕΛΕΣΜΑΤΑ Βρέθηκε στατιστικά σημαντική βελτίωση σε όλους τους παράγοντες της κόπωσης, αφού μειώθηκαν σημαντικά οι τιμές της «γενικής κόπωσης» (αρχική μέτρηση μέσος όρος [ΜΟ]=4,60, τελική μέτρηση ΜΟ=2,98, p<0,001), της «σωματικής κόπωσης» (αρχική μέτρηση ΜΟ=4,11, τελική μέτρηση ΜΟ=2,60, p<0,001), της «πνευματικής κόπωσης» (αρχική μέτρηση ΜΟ=3,35, τελική μέτρηση ΜΟ=2,00, p<0,001), της «αίσθησης της μειωμένης δραστηριότητας» (αρχική μέτρηση ΜΟ=3,76, τελική μέτρηση ΜΟ=2,03, p<0,001) και της «αίσθησης της μειωμένης παρακίνησης» (αρχική μέτρηση ΜΟ=3,35, τελική μέτρηση ΜΟ=1,85, p<0,001) για την πειραματική ομάδα, ενώ για την ομάδα ελέγχου δεν παρατηρήθηκε κάποια σημαντική βελτίωση. ΣΥΜΠΕΡΑΣΜΑΤΑ Η συμμετοχή σε ένα πρόγραμμα ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών, μια ευχάριστη μορφή αερόβιας φυσικής δραστηριότητας, μπορεί να βελτιώσει όλους τους παράγοντες που συνθέτουν την αντιλαμβανόμενη κόπωση ασθενών γυναικών με καρκίνο του μαστού.
... Οι ερευνητές υποστήριξαν ότι η αερόβια άσκηση με παραδοσιακούς χορούς και ασκήσεις για το άνω μέρος του σώματος μπορεί να είναι μια εναλλακτική επιλογή σωματικής δραστηριότητας για τις επιζούσες του καρκίνου του μαστού, προωθώντας έτσι τα οφέλη στη φυσική λειτουργία, στη δύναμη και στην ψυχολογική κατάσταση. 21 Ο σκοπός της παρούσας μελέτης ήταν να διερευνήσει αν η συμμετοχή σε ένα πρόγραμμα ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών μπορεί να μειώσει τα επίπεδα κόπωσης γυναικών με καρκίνο του μαστού. Πιο συγκεκριμένα, στόχος της μελέτης ήταν να εξετάσει εάν η συμμετοχή σε ένα πρόγραμμα διδασκαλίας ελληνικών παραδοσιακών χορών θα μπορούσε να μειώσει τα επίπεδα κόπωσης που αισθάνονται οι γυναίκες οι οποίες όχι μόνο διαγνώστηκαν με καρκίνο του μαστού αλλά έχουν υποστεί χειρουργική επέμβαση, μαστεκτομή και χημειοθεραπεία. ...
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OBJECTIVE Study of the effect of an interventional program of Greek traditional dances on the levels of perceived fatigue in women following treatment for breast cancer. METHOD The study was conducted on 30 women with a survival time of 4±3 years after the end of their treatment for breast cancer, which, in additionto mastectomy, included radiotherapy and chemotherapy (20 in the experimental group and 10 in the control group). The 20 women in the experimental group attended a 3-month program of Greek dances, with 3 lessons per week, of 50 minutes each, while the women in the control group did not participate in any organized physical activities. A total of 36 courses was organized. Data collection was carried out, before and after completion of the course of dancing, usingthe Greek Multidimensional Fatigue Questionnaire. The statistical analyses undertaken in this study were reliability analysis (Cronbach’s α) and the ANOVA repeated measures test. RESULTS Analysis of the responses revealed significant statistical improvement in the fatigue level recorded by the women in the experimental group. Specifically, the mean values on the fatigue questionnaire were, for “general fatigue”: initial measurement M=4.60, final measurement Μ=2.98 (p<0.001), “physical fatigue”: initial measurement Μ=4.11, final measurement Μ=2.60 (p<0.001), “mental fatigue”: initial measurement Μ=3.35, final measurement Μ=2.0 (p<0.001), and for the “sense of reduced activity”: initial measurement Μ=3.76, final measurement Μ=2.03 (p<0.001), and the “sense of reduced motivation”: initial measurement Μ=3.35, final measurement Μ=1.85 (p<0.001). No change in fatigue level over the same period of time was observed in the control group. CONCLUSIONS Participation in a program of traditional Greek dance, a pleasant form of aerobic physical activity, can produce significant improvement in all of the factors that contribute to perceived fatigue in patients following treatment for breast cancer.
... Dance therapy is widely investigated in breast cancer patients, 23,[25][26][27] and particularly provides psychological benefits, with feelings of freedom and joy resulting from dancing. Greek traditional dances combined with upper body training resulted in an increase of life satisfaction and a decrease of depressive symptoms in breast cancer patients 28 . Regarding benefits for quality of life, circle dance 29 and ballroom dance 30 also showed positive effects. ...
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Introduction Breast cancer has innumerable consequences in women’s lives and physical activity can be beneficial during this period. Objectives To analyze the influence of belly dancing on the body image and self-esteem of women during and after breast cancer treatment. Methods Nineteen women diagnosed with breast cancer, divided into a control group (8 women) and a study group (11 women), who were under treatment or post-treatment at the Center for Oncological Research (CEPON), participated in the study. A questionnaire was used for data collection, divided into three blocks as follows: a) general information - sociodemographic and clinical characterization; b) body image - Body Image After Breast Cancer; and c) self-esteem - Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The study group underwent a belly dance intervention consisting of 60-minute classes, twice a week, for a total period of 12 weeks. Women in the control group only maintained their routine activities. Results Significant changes were observed in the improvement of body image in the belly dance group in the pre- and post-intervention periods in the body stigma (p = 0.017) and transparency (p = 0.021) scales. There were no changes in regards to self-esteem. The control group had no changes in either body image or self-esteem. Conclusion The influence of belly dancing on the improvement of women’s body image was observed after 12 weeks of intervention. Thus, it is understood that physical activity may help these women after breast cancer, and should be encouraged by health professionals in this field. Level of evidence II; Therapeutic studies - Investigation of treatment results.
... Mainly through the reviews, we also found a number of formerly undetected studies from 2011 and earlier, not yet included into the general meta-analyses. We consider it important to enumerate them here for potential future analyses: Belardinelli et al. (2008), Burgess et al. (2006), Chouhan and Kumar (2011), Connolly et al. (2011), Coubard et al. (2011), Hall (2011), Hwang et al. (2010, Kaltsatou et al. (2011Kaltsatou et al. ( , 2015, Quiroga Murcia et al. (2009), andXiong andLi (2009). ...
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Background: Dance is an embodied activity and, when applied therapeutically, can have several specific and unspecific health benefits. In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the effectiveness of dance movement therapy1(DMT) and dance interventions for psychological health outcomes. Research in this area grew considerably from 1.3 detected studies/year in 1996–2012 to 6.8 detected studies/year in 2012–2018. Method: We synthesized 41 controlled intervention studies (N = 2,374; from 01/2012 to 03/2018), 21 from DMT, and 20 from dance, investigating the outcome clusters of quality of life, clinical outcomes (with sub-analyses of depression and anxiety), interpersonal skills, cognitive skills, and (psycho-)motor skills. We included recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in areas such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, autism, elderly patients, oncology, neurology, chronic heart failure, and cardiovascular disease, including follow-up data in eight studies. Results: Analyses yielded a medium overall effect (d2 = 0.60), with high heterogeneity of results (I2 = 72.62%). Sorted by outcome clusters, the effects were medium to large (d = 0.53 to d = 0.85). All effects, except the one for (psycho-)motor skills, showed high inconsistency of results. Sensitivity analyses revealed that type of intervention (DMT or dance) was a significant moderator of results. In the DMT cluster, the overall medium effect was small, significant, and homogeneous/consistent (d = 0.30, p < 0.001, I2 = 3.47). In the dance intervention cluster, the overall medium effect was large, significant, yet heterogeneous/non-consistent (d = 0.81, p < 0.001, I2 = 77.96). Results suggest that DMT decreases depression and anxiety and increases quality of life and interpersonal and cognitive skills, whereas dance interventions increase (psycho-)motor skills. Larger effect sizes resulted from observational measures, possibly indicating bias. Follow-up data showed that on 22 weeks after the intervention, most effects remained stable or slightly increased. Discussion: Consistent effects of DMT coincide with findings from former meta-analyses. Most dance intervention studies came from preventive contexts and most DMT studies came from institutional healthcare contexts with more severely impaired clinical patients, where we found smaller effects, yet with higher clinical relevance. Methodological shortcomings of many included studies and heterogeneity of outcome measures limit results. Initial findings on long-term effects are promising.
... According to Pitsi et al. (2008), the Greek traditional dance seems to be particularly beneficial for both physical and mental well-being, since it was found to be a form of exercise similar to a routine aerobic physical activity in terms of intensity. Kaltsatou, Mameletzi and Douka (2010) have shown that an intervention with Greek traditional dance in breast cancer patients has contributed to improving their physical functioning and satisfaction with life, as well as reducing symptoms of depression. According to a study by Papaioannou, Mavrovouniotis & Argiriadou (2005), a Greek traditional dance intervention helped the participants reduce their transient stress and improve their general mood. ...
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This paper presents research data upon the relationship between Dance and Quality of Life (QoL), as well as upon the multiple benefits that dance provides concerning the participants' physical, mental, psychological and emotional health, as well as their social and communication skills. The aim of this study was: (a) to analyze the epistemological assumptions based on which relevant research has been so far conducted, and (b) to propose a different assumption about QoL and Dance in general, as well as QoL and Traditional Dance in particular. As a form of physical activity, dance and, by extension, the Greek traditional dance, have highly beneficial impact on communication and interaction skills, provide satisfaction and positive feelings, promote physical and mental health, and generally improve many domains of the participants' QoL regardless of age.
... In comparison to previously reported 6MWT distances in cancer patients and survivors, the mean distance from the present study (416.4 m) is near the bottom of the established range (403-594 m) [15,[33][34][35][36]. Given the significant impact of CIPN on 6MWT distance, it is unsurprising that 6MWT distance was reduced in our predominantly affected cohort (87% presenting CIPN symptoms). ...
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Background Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a significant and often lasting side effect of cancer treatment, with increasing CIPN severity associated with increasing deficits in balance, gait, and mobility. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is a widely validated and utilized measure of general physical functioning and mobility, although its utility in a CIPN context is unclear. This study aimed to determine the utility of the 6MWT as an assessment of mobility deficits in a CIPN cohort and utilize the 6MWT to compare mobility data from CIPN patients to those of healthy and clinical populations. Methods Cancer survivors exposed to neurotoxic chemotherapies (N = 100; mean 17 ± 13 months post-treatment; mean age 59 ± 13 years) completed a single cross-sectional assessment of patient-reported and objective CIPN, mobility (6MWT), and disability. Results CIPN symptoms were reported in the majority of the cohort (87%). Increasing age, patient-reported and objective CIPN symptoms, and disability were associated with decreasing 6MWT distance (.48 ≤ R ≤ .63; p < .001) in bivariate models. Multiple regression models of 6MWT distance included age, sex, and patient-reported or objective CIPN severity as significant independent correlates (.62 ≤ R ≤ .64; p < .03). 6MWT distances in patients with CIPN symptom severity above the cohort mean were consistent with mean values reported in diabetic neuropathy and clinical populations. Conclusions Increased CIPN symptoms are associated with increased mobility deficits. The 6MWT demonstrates promising utility as a mobility assessment in a CIPN cohort. Implications for Cancer Survivors The impact of the progression of CIPN on mobility deficits in survivors emphasizes the need for effective interventions to treat and prevent CIPN.
... After 12 weeks of dance program observed significant progress in physiological peak parameters such as oxygen consumption and exhaustion time. Other research with Greek traditional dance, performed on people with breast cancer, showed improvement in their physical functioning, satisfaction with their lives as well as reducing depression symptoms (Kaltsatou et al., 2011). ...
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Regular physical activity is considered one of the most important factors for lifestyle, for maintaining good health in older ages and increasing life expectancy. Dance is considered an activity that involves coordinating movements with music, as well as brain activation because it is constantly necessary to learn and remember new steps. Dance as a musical-kinetics skill, requires the coordination of body movements with rhythmic stimuli, developing the adaptability of the movement. One-hundred-thirty (130) elderly people aged 60 years and over (mean age 67 years old) with an average of 8 years of education, attended Greek traditional dance sessions for 32 weeks. The frequency was 2 times per week, for 75 min per session. Dances were selected from all over Greece with moderate intensity initially. During the program, they had the opportunity to try with greater intensity dances. At the beginning and after the end of intervention all the participants were evaluated by the Fullerton Senior Fitness Test for their physical fitness, the Single Leg Balance and the Handgrip Strength Test. The results showed a significant improvement in their physical fitness (Chair Stand: T = −5.459, p < 0.001; Arm Curl: T = −5.750, p < 0.001; Back Scratch: T = −4.648, p < 0.001; Sit and Reach: T = −4.759, p < 0.001; 2 min Step: T = −5.567, p < 0.001; Foot Up and Go: T = −8.599, p < 0.001) and at their static balance with eyes open (Balance 1 leg: T = −4.996, p < 0.001) and Handgrip Strength (Handgrip: T = −3.490, p < 0.001). Elderly seem to enjoy dancing as an activity while maintaining their functionality. Probably the elderly in traditional dance cause prosperity in their lives by promoting active aging.
... Dance training may promote positive physical adaptations in the body improving fitness, flexibility, speed, agility, strength and postural control (Alricsson, Harms-Ringdahl, Eriksson, & Werner, 2003;DiPasquale, 2017;Ferrufino, Bril, Dietrich, Nonaka, & Coubard, 2011;Kaltsatou, Mameletzi, & Douka, 2011). It has also been suggested that dance may have meaningful effects on brain structures, improving neuroplasticity and rhythm perception networks (Karpati, Giacosa, Foster, Penhune, & Hyde, 2015;Kim, Cha, Kang, Kim, & Han, 2016). ...
Article
Background: This paper examines the feasibility of utilizing an integrative contemporary dance class for improving physical function in adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Methods: Eighteen individuals participated in a 12-week dance class alongside 11 matriculated college students registered in an integrative dance course. Lower extremity strength, flexibility, mobility and balance testing was measured at pre- and post- testing. The dance class comprised 60 min of dance training two times per week. College students participated by dancing alongside the individuals in the class and assisting, if required. Results: Significant improvements were found in lower extremity strength in all muscle groups tested, hamstring flexibility, generalized mobility and stability. Conclusions: Integrative contemporary dance may provide meaningful physical improvements for individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities and are in need of further development and research.
... Otros estudios como el realizado con pacientes psiquiátricos con depresión (Koch, Morlinghaus y Fuchs, 2007) o con mujeres con cáncer de mama ( Kaltsatou, Mameletzi y Douka, 2011), obtuvieron que la danza favorece la reducción de los niveles de depresión y de ansiedad, mejorando así la condición psicológica. Sin embargo, podemos observar cómo en ellos no se determina la relación directa de la danza y la mejora en el ámbito de la autoestima. ...
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The Master’s Dissertation that is now presented aims to design an intervention proyect seeking the analysis of the existing relation between dance and the increase of self-esteem levels through the different dimensions it is formed. For this, a free-creative dance programme is designed and implemented through the Physical Education area and a total duration of 13 sessions, aimed at third cycle Primary school students. In order to evaluate the programme, the Multimedia and Multilingual Questionnaire for the Evaluation of the Self-esteem is used as developed and validated by Ramos in 2008. The results inform that free-creative dance favours the increase of physical ability self-concept, physical image self-concept, social self-concept, emotional stability self-concept and self-concept in general. This encourages global self-esteem of the third cycle Primary school students.
... Although resistance exercise enhances musculoskeletal strength and bone mineral density, but has smaller effects on body composition and lipid profiles [17,25]. And also, single-type aerobic exercise interventions improve body composition and some adipokine levels, but do not affect musculoskeletal strength or the levels of biomarkers associated with bone mineral density [16,39]. In general, we found that combined exercise improves not only body composition and adipokine levels, but also musculoskeletal strength and the levels of biomarkers associated with bone mineral density [14,19,21,23]. ...
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Background Exercise has been identified as a beneficial intervention to enhance quality of life in breast cancer survivors. In addition, there has been a noteworthy increase in studies emphasizing the benefits of exercise in cancer. We sought to summarize the empirical literature concerning the effects of exercise on physical fitness and biomarker levels in breast cancer survivors according to the type of exercise. Methods We searched PubMed and PubMed Central for studies on the association of exercise with the levels of various biomarkers and physical fitness in breast cancer survivors. We investigated the effects of different types of exercise (aerobic, resistance, or combined) on breast cancer survivors, with changes in physical fitness and biomarker levels as the primary outcomes. Results In total, 118 research papers published from 2012 to July 2016 were retrieved from PubMed and PubMed Central. Of these, 24 papers met our inclusion criteria. All types of exercise were found to improve physical fitness in breast cancer survivors. However, the results with regard to biomarkers were controversial. Conclusion The findings of this review suggest that combined exercise is associated with better outcomes than aerobic or resistance exercise alone in breast cancer survivors.
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Purpose The “Ballet after breast cancer” study sought to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a 16-week classical ballet intervention for breast cancer survivors, delivered face-to-face and/or online. Methods Breast cancer survivors were recruited to take part in 2 × 1-h ballet classes per week for 16 weeks. Primary outcomes of feasibility and acceptability were assessed according to rates of enrolment and attendance and participant feedback via questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included quality of life (QOL), upper-body disability, shoulder range of motion (ROM), muscular strength, aerobic capacity, and physical activity levels. Associations between rate of attendance and changes in secondary measures were explored. Results Thirty-one participants (62% of eligible individuals) enrolled in the program. Twenty-nine women commenced the intervention [53.3 ± 10.8 years (Mean ± SD)], attending 77.6% [67.6, 87.5] (Mean [95% CI]) of sessions. Based on these rates of enrolment and attendance, and participant feedback, the program was deemed feasible and acceptable to participants. Significant improvements in shoulder ROM and reductions in sedentary behaviour were achieved. Participants also reported improvements in physical capacity and psychological, social, and cognitive wellbeing. Conclusions The “Ballet after breast cancer” program, delivered face-to-face and/or online, was feasible and acceptable to breast cancer survivors. Improvements in shoulder ROM achieved doing ballet were pertinent given the adverse effects of upper-body morbidity on breast cancer survivor QOL. Improvements in physical activity behaviour and perceived benefits to wellbeing also support the use of ballet to mitigate QOL impairment after treatment. Implications for cancer survivors The physical demands and the fun, creative, and social characteristics of ballet promote improvement across multiple domains of health and wellbeing. Ballet shows promise as an activity to improve QOL and increase long-term engagement in health-promoting physical activity after breast cancer.
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The research was conducted during 2018 - 2020 on pellic vertisol soil type. Under investigation was cycloxydim-tolerant grain maize hybrid Trilogi duo (Zea mays L.), FAO 350. Factor A included the years of investigation. Factor B included untreated control, 7 soil-applied herbicides by conventional technology: Sulcotrack (sulcotrione + terbuthylazine), Successor TX (petoxamide + terbuthylazine), Acris (dimethenamid-P + terbuthylazine), Deflexo mix (S-metolachlor + terbuthylazine), Click duo (terbuthylazine + pendimethalin), Bismarck KS (clomazone + pendimethalin), Pledge 50 VP (flumioxazine); 6 foliar-applied herbicides by conventional technology: Sovereign OD (nicosulfuron + sulcotrione), Mistral plus (dicamba + nicosulfuron), Spandis (prosulfuron + dicamba + nicosulfuron), Arigo WG (mesotrione + nicosulfuron + rimsulfuron), Collage 64 OD (thiphensulfuron-methyl + nicosulfuron), Capreno SC (tembotrione + thiencarbazone-methyl); 8 herbicide tank mixtures by Duo system technology: Starane gold + Focus ultra (fluroxypyr + florasulam + cycloxydim), Kabadex extra + Focus ultra (mesotrione + florasulam + cycloxydim), Callisto plus + Focus ultra (mesotrione + dicamba + cycloxydim), Magneto top 464 SL + Focus ultra (2.4-D + dicamba + cycloxydim), Peak 75 WG + Focus ultra (prosulfuron + cycloxydim), Permit + Focus ultra (halosulfuron-methyl + cycloxydim), Bentador + Focus ultra (bentazone + cycloxydim), Onyx + Focus ultra (pyridate + cycloxydim). The highest grain yields are obtained by use of herbicide tank mixtures by technology Duo system Kabadex extra + Focus ultra, Callisto plus + Focus ultra, Magneto top + Focus ultra, Starane gold + Focus ultra and Permit + Focus ultra. High grain yields are also obtained by use of foliar herbicides by conventional technology Spandis, Arigo and Mistral plus. The use of soil-applied herbicides Sulcotrack, Successor, Acris, Deflexo mix, Click duo, Bismarck and Pledge in maize crops leads to lower grain yields due to their inefficacy against perennial graminaceous and broadleaved weeds and against the annual broadleaved weed Xanthium strumarium L. The most unstable are untreated control, herbicide tank mixtures Onyx + Focus ultra and Peak + Focus ultra, foliar-applied herbicide Collage and soil-applied herbicide Successor. Technologically the most valuable are herbicide tank mixtures Kabadex extra + Focus ultra, Callisto plus + Focus ultra, Magneto top + Focus ultra and Starane gold + Focus ultra by Duo system technology, which followed by foliar-applied herbicides Spandis, Arigo, Mistral plus, Capreno and Sovereign by conventional technology. Soil-applied herbicides Pledge, Bismarck and Successor, foliar-applied herbicide Collage and herbicide tank mixtures Peak + Focus ultra and Onyx + Focus ultra have low estimates.
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Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to identify the effects of different training methods in women who have survived breast cancer (WSBC). Data Sources: Studies were identified by searching SportDiscus, Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Scielo, and Bireme. Study Selection: The inclusion criteria were articles that addressed only breast cancer in women, were randomized clinical trials, and interventions involving physical training with Consort ≥80. Data Extraction: The PICO and CONSORT strategies were used for the selection of articles and quality assessment of randomized clinical trials, respectively. Two independent reviewers searched for articles among the databases. Disagreements were discussed, and in the case of an impasse, a third reviewer was consulted. Data Synthesis: Evidence that demonstrated the beneficial effects of physical exercise programs carried out by WSBC. Moderate or high-intensity exercise sessions have been shown to benefit women survivors of breast cancer. Among the modalities, the resistance exercise showed effects from 55% of one-repetition maximum (1 RM), exclusively or associated with other training regimes, such as aerobic (from 48% of heart rate), high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or impact. The main benefits include increased muscle strength, promoted by the practice of resistance exercise in combination with other types of exercises or alone; decreased fatigue; improved quality of life; improved psychosocial effects, and increased leisure time. Conclusions: Physical training performed at a moderate or high intensity (aerobic or anaerobic) can reduce fatigue, improve quality of life, improve sleep quality, and increase bone mineral density in women survivors of breast cancer.
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Background: Increased physical activity has been recommended as an important lifestyle modification for the prevention and control of hypertension. Walking is a low-cost form of physical activity and one which most people can do. Studies testing the effect of walking on blood pressure have revealed inconsistent findings. Objectives: To determine the effect of walking as a physical activity intervention on blood pressure and heart rate. Search methods: We searched the following databases up to March 2020: the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2020, Issue 2), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also searched the following Chinese databases up to May 2020: Index to Taiwan Periodical Literature System; National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertation in Taiwan; China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Journals, Theses & Dissertations; and Wanfang Medical Online. We contacted authors of relevant papers regarding further published and unpublished work. The searches had no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials of participants, aged 16 years and over, which evaluated the effects of a walking intervention compared to non-intervention control on blood pressure and heart rate were included. Data collection and analysis: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Where data were not available in the published reports, we contacted authors. Pooled results for blood pressure and heart rate were presented as mean differences (MDs) between groups with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We undertook subgroup analyses for age and sex. We undertook sensitivity analyses to assess the effect of sample size on our findings. Main results: A total of 73 trials met our inclusion criteria. These 73 trials included 5763 participants and were undertaken in 22 countries. Participants were aged from 16 to 84 years and there were approximately 1.5 times as many females as males. The characteristics of walking interventions in the included studies were as follows: the majority of walking interventions was at home/community (n = 50) but supervised (n = 36 out of 47 reported the information of supervision); the average intervention length was 15 weeks, average walking time per week was 153 minutes and the majority of walking intensity was moderate. Many studies were at risk of selection bias and performance bias. Primary outcome We found moderate-certainty evidence suggesting that walking reduces systolic blood pressure (SBP) (MD -4.11 mmHg, 95% CI -5.22 to -3.01; 73 studies, n = 5060). We found moderate-certainty evidence suggesting that walking reduces SBP in participants aged 40 years and under (MD -4.41 mmHg, 95% CI -6.17 to -2.65; 14 studies, n = 491), and low-certainty evidence that walking reduces SBP in participants aged 41 to 60 years (MD -3.79 mmHg, 95% CI -5.64 to -1.94, P < 0.001; 35 studies, n = 1959), and those aged 60 years of over (MD -4.30 mmHg, 95% CI -6.17 to -2.44, 24 studies, n = 2610). We also found low certainty-evidence suggesting that walking reduces SBP in both females (MD -5.65 mmHg, 95% CI -7.89 to -3.41; 22 studies, n = 1149) and males (MD -4.64 mmHg, 95% CI -8.69 to -0.59; 6 studies, n = 203). Secondary outcomes We found low-certainty evidence suggesting that walking reduces diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (MD -1.79 mmHg, 95% CI -2.51 to -1.07; 69 studies, n = 4711) and heart rate (MD -2.76 beats per minute (bpm), 95% CI -4.57 to -0.95; 26 studies, n = 1747). We found moderate-certainty evidence suggesting that walking reduces DBP for participants aged 40 years and under (MD -3.01 mmHg, 95% CI -4.44 to -1.58; 14 studies, n = 491) and low-certainty evidence suggesting that walking reduces DBP for participants aged 41 to 60 years (MD -1.74 mmHg, 95% CI -2.95 to -0.52; 32 studies, n = 1730) and those aged 60 years and over (MD -1.33 mmHg, 95% CI -2.40 to -0.26; 23 studies, n = 2490). We found moderate-certainty evidence that suggests walking reduces DBP for males (MD -2.54 mmHg, 95% CI -4.84 to -0.24; 6 studies, n = 203) and low-certainty evidence that walking reduces DBP for females (MD -2.69 mmHg, 95% CI -4.16 to -1.23; 20 studies, n = 1000). Only 21 included studies reported adverse events. Of these 21 studies, 16 reported no adverse events, the remaining five studies reported eight adverse events, with knee injury being reported five times. Authors' conclusions: Moderate-certainty evidence suggests that walking probably reduces SBP. Moderate- or low-certainty evidence suggests that walking may reduce SBP for all ages and both sexes. Low-certainty evidence suggests that walking may reduce DBP and heart rate. Moderate- and low-certainty evidence suggests walking may reduce DBP and heart rate for all ages and both sexes.
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Background Shoulder dysfunction is frequently experienced by survivors of breast cancer following surgery, and it is associated with both reduced ability to perform daily living tasks and decreased overall quality of life. Shoulder function is often measured with self-reported questionnaires. It is not known to what extent shoulder function has been objectively measured in order to accurately assess return-to-work related outcomes. Objectives This review aimed to determine what is known about objectively evaluated shoulder function following breast cancer. Methods A comprehensive search of several databases was performed to identify all relevant research. All identified studies were screened and those including the objective measurement of shoulder function of survivors of breast cancer post-surgery were included. Data were extracted by two reviewers and results were consolidated and presented. Results The majority (71%, n = 175) of studies measured range of motion to assess function of the shoulder in survivors of breast cancer. Range of motion was usually with goniometers (57%, n = 141). Strength was the second most common functional outcome reported. The use of functional work tasks or activities of daily living to assess shoulder ability or capacity was limited to less than 5% (n = 7) of studies. Most studies used baseline measures to assess outcomes (61%, n = 150), while 29% (n = 72) explicitly used the contralateral arm to evaluate dysfunction. Conclusion Range of motion and shoulder strength are frequently measured in survivors of breast cancer. Future investigations should focus on functional movements and outcomes to assess shoulder function, especially for the return-to-work considerations.
Article
Background Analyze the effects of a 12-week dance intervention on the sleep quality and the level of pain among women with breast cancer. Methods Non-randomized clinical trial including 21 breast cancer survivors allocated in intervention group (n = 11) or control group (n = 10). Intervention group received a 12-week mix dance intervention and the control group maintained their routine activities. Data collection was realized through the application of a questionnaire before and after 12 weeks, involving pain (VAS) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). The Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Šidák correction, and multiple linear regression was used. Results No significant effects were found on sleep quality and pain after the 12-week intervention with a mix dance protocol. Also, no significant difference was found between intervention and control group during post-intervention. The multiple linear regression analysis, controlled by stage of treatment, did not present a significant relationship between sleep quality and pain. Additionally, some spontaneous reports provided by the participants demonstrated a subjective improvement in their social life and general well-being. Conclusion The 12-week mix dance intervention did not seem to directly influence the sleep quality and pain of breast cancer survivors in this study; however, no adverse events were reported. Perhaps, a dance protocol focusing only in one modality of dance may be more effective for breast cancer survivors on sleep quality and pain.
Article
The aim of this study is to investigate whether parents’ perceptions on the emotions and moods of their children are influenced by the children’s participating in traditional dance activities. The sample of the research consisted of 280 parents of adolescents aged 12-13. There were three experimental groups: a) “Control group”, b) “Experimental group 1” and c) “Experimental group 2”. The measurements was carried out with the KIDSCREEN-52 Scale (Ravens-Sieberer et al., 2007). The dimension used was “Mood and emotions”, which includes 7 questions. There were three measurements. The results of the research showed that the parents’ perceptions concerning the factor “mood and emotions” for the quality of life of their children were differentiated among the groups according to the measurements. According to the parents’ perceptions, their adolescent children’s moods and emotions were improved after participating regularly in extracurricular Greek dance activities organized by nonprofit private societies. In conclusion, parents acknowledge that their children’s participating in dance activities in nonprofit societies improved their general mood and developed their positive emotions, which is quite helpful for adolescents to overcome the emotional disturbance of this age.
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Stress and anxiety levels in cancer patients tend to decrease by performing bodily-kinesthetic and musical activities. The hypothesis of the present study is that attending lessons in Greek traditional dance is an effective method for managing anxiety and stress in patients diagnosed with cancer of any type both during and after treatment. The study was conducted on 300 cancer patients (150 experimental subjects, 150 controls) selected by Attica hospitals and nonprofit cancer patients’ organizations. Each patient in the experimental group attended an 8-week Greek traditional dance lesson program. Lessons were held twice per week, lasting 60 min each. A similar group of cancer patients not participating in any organized physical activity during the same time period served as a control group. Data were collected using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (Dass-21) questionnaire and subjected to reliability analysis (Cronbach’s alpha) and deviation-dependent analysis (one-way repeated). Both stress and anxiety values decreased significantly in the experimental group (stress value: initial mean = 16.27, second mean = 2.58, final mean = 6.77, p < 0.001; anxiety value: initial mean = 15.59, second mean = 2.81, final mean = 5.35, p < 0.001). In contrast, no significant fluctuation was observed in the control group. Thus, there was a significant decrease in stress and anxiety values in cancer patients who attended Greek traditional dances lessons with important psychotherapeutic significance.
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La littérature apporte de plus en plus de preuves du bénéfice de la pratique d'une activité physique dans le cadre des préventions secondaire et tertiaire du cancer du sein, cancer le plus fréquent chez la femme. Ces travaux de thèse sont nés de la collaboration entre une équipe experte de la prise en charge clinique et de la nutrition de patients atteints de cancer (Centre de Lutte contre le Cancer Léon Bérard de Lyon) et une équipe experte de l'activité physique (Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport EA647). Cette approche " recherche-action " a permis d'implanter des programmes novateurs d'activité physique adaptée (APA) auprès des patientes atteintes de cancer du sein et ce, de manière concomitante aux traitements adjuvants. Les programmes d'APA complétés d'une prise en charge diététique apparaissent comme un moyen faisable et peu coûteux de lutter contre les facteurs reconnus de mauvais pronostic que sont la prise de poids, les risques métaboliques, mais aussi la problématique de l'inactivité physique et de la sédentarité qui s'installent dès le diagnostic de la maladie. Les résultats originaux de ce travail de thèse fournissent des avancées importantes pour promouvoir l'intégration de l'APA en tant que soin de support des patients atteints de cancer, tout au long des traitements et dans la phase de réhabilitation. Ces travaux permettent de fixer les modalités de prise en charge de ce public spécifique, mettant à disposition des professionnels du secteur un panel de connaissances scientifiques et pratiques. Ils démontrent ainsi la compatibilité et l'applicabilité directe de la recherche en milieu professionnel.
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Background: Studies have shown that physical activity can reduce the risk of mortality for female breast cancer patients and improve quality of life, reduce weight, and alter circulating biomarker levels. We conducted a pilot trial to determine the feasibility of increasing physical activity through a cultural dance intervention to achieve similar benefits. Methods: Conducted a pilot trial implementing a cultural dance intervention to increase and sustain physical activity for breast cancer survivors, which consisted of a six-month group-based intervention of Hula Dance. Anthropometric measures, fasting blood draws, and self-reported questionnaires to assess physical activity, mood, and quality of life, were completed at baseline, at the end of the 6-month intervention (time point month-6), and at two additional post-intervention time points (month-12 and month-24) to assess sustainability. Results: A total of 11 women with a median age of 63 years were enrolled in the intervention trial. Eight of the 11 (73%) completed the trial to month-12 and demonstrated an overall significant increase in weekly moderate exercise. There were no significant changes in intra-individual body mass index (BMI). However, there was a sustained post-intervention reduction in waist circumference and significant changes in circulating biomarker levels. For the self-reported measures, there was a significant increase in vigor/activity (p < 0.001; Profile of Mood States-Short Form). Conclusion: Our intervention pilot trial demonstrated that a cultural dance program could achieve a sustainable increase in physical activity for breast cancer survivors, with potential to improve quality of life, increase vigor, and decrease levels of circulating cytokines associated with obesity and inflammation.
Article
The diagnosis of breast cancer, the subsequent treatment and the surgery often cause a deep wound and a change in women self-image. In our survey we intended to analyze the relationship with their own body in breast cancer women, examining their participation in an arts, dance and movement project. The perception of the body in the women was detected with the focus group methodology and through the analysis of documents (letters to their bodies). The collected data confirmed the problematic relationship of the women with their bodies. A significant contribution in constructively tackling the difficulties was provided by the planned activities, which were found capable of generating help to write the new body text.
Chapter
The increased life expectancy is associated with an increase in multiple chronic conditions, such as functional disability, need for help, reduced mobility, depression, isolation and loneliness. It is considered necessary to give particular attention in order to observe changes to services and facilities aimed at the elderly, to design and to implement appropriate health programs initially on prevention and continuously on treatment to achieve a satisfactory level of quality of life and a significant improvement and facilitation in their daily life. The traditional dance which is a health program that is very close to the interests of the elderly, could promote their health and contribute to the maximum delay of aging. The aim of this work was to investigate whether the elderly can participate in traditional dance programs using new technologies, effectively promoting active aging and pursuing an autonomous and independent living. Fifty-one (51) elderly women participated in this study and they were divided into two groups, the first group was the traditional classical dance intervention [26 elderly, age 66.23 (SD = 4.46), years of education 7.38 (SD = 2.15)] and the second was the dance intervention group using the technology [25 elderly, age 67.12 (SD = 4.43), years of education 11.08 (SD = 4.24)]. The interventions lasted 24 weeks with a frequency of 2 times per week in sessions of 75-min at a Day Care Centers. Both groups improved their aerobic capacity, but the Dance group also improved their sociability, preventing falls, while reducing their depression. The technology exists in the lives of most people but for elderly the last years become an attempt to approach this situation through health or education programs to familiarize them with technology and leaving social exclusion.
Article
Background: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in the Cochrane Liibrary 2013, Issue 9. Despite good evidence for the health benefits of regular exercise for people living with or beyond cancer, understanding how to promote sustainable exercise behaviour change in sedentary cancer survivors, particularly over the long term, is not as well understood. A large majority of people living with or recovering from cancer do not meet current exercise recommendations. Hence, reviewing the evidence on how to promote and sustain exercise behaviour is important for understanding the most effective strategies to ensure benefit in the patient population and identify research gaps. Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions designed to promote exercise behaviour in sedentary people living with and beyond cancer and to address the following secondary questions: Which interventions are most effective in improving aerobic fitness and skeletal muscle strength and endurance? Which interventions are most effective in improving exercise behaviour amongst patients with different cancers? Which interventions are most likely to promote long-term (12 months or longer) exercise behaviour? What frequency of contact with exercise professionals and/or healthcare professionals is associated with increased exercise behaviour? What theoretical basis is most often associated with better behavioural outcomes? What behaviour change techniques (BCTs) are most often associated with increased exercise behaviour? What adverse effects are attributed to different exercise interventions? Search methods: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We updated our 2013 Cochrane systematic review by updating the searches of the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, PsycLIT/PsycINFO, SportDiscus and PEDro up to May 2018. We also searched the grey literature, trial registries, wrote to leading experts in the field and searched reference lists of included studies and other related recent systematic reviews. Selection criteria: We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared an exercise intervention with usual care or 'waiting list' control in sedentary people over the age of 18 with a homogenous primary cancer diagnosis. Data collection and analysis: In the update, review authors independently screened all titles and abstracts to identify studies that might meet the inclusion criteria, or that could not be safely excluded without assessment of the full text (e.g. when no abstract is available). We extracted data from all eligible papers with at least two members of the author team working independently (RT, LS and RG). We coded BCTs according to the CALO-RE taxonomy. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane's tool for assessing risk of bias. When possible, and if appropriate, we performed a fixed-effect meta-analysis of study outcomes. If statistical heterogeneity was noted, a meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model. For continuous outcomes (e.g. cardiorespiratory fitness), we extracted the final value, the standard deviation (SD) of the outcome of interest and the number of participants assessed at follow-up in each treatment arm, to estimate the standardised mean difference (SMD) between treatment arms. SMD was used, as investigators used heterogeneous methods to assess individual outcomes. If a meta-analysis was not possible or was not appropriate, we narratively synthesised studies. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach with the GRADE profiler. Main results: We included 23 studies in this review, involving a total of 1372 participants (an addition of 10 studies, 724 participants from the original review); 227 full texts were screened in the update and 377 full texts were screened in the original review leaving 35 publications from a total of 23 unique studies included in the review. We planned to include all cancers, but only studies involving breast, prostate, colorectal and lung cancer met the inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies incorporated a target level of exercise that could meet current recommendations for moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (i.e.150 minutes per week); or resistance exercise (i.e. strength training exercises at least two days per week).Adherence to exercise interventions, which is crucial for understanding treatment dose, is still reported inconsistently. Eight studies reported intervention adherence of 75% or greater to an exercise prescription that met current guidelines. These studies all included a component of supervision: in our analysis of BCTs we designated these studies as 'Tier 1 trials'. Six studies reported intervention adherence of 75% or greater to an aerobic exercise goal that was less than the current guideline recommendations: in our analysis of BCTs we designated these studies as 'Tier 2 trials.' A hierarchy of BCTs was developed for Tier 1 and Tier 2 trials, with programme goal setting, setting of graded tasks and instruction of how to perform behaviour being amongst the most frequent BCTs. Despite the uncertainty surrounding adherence in some of the included studies, interventions resulted in improvements in aerobic exercise tolerance at eight to 12 weeks (SMD 0.54, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.70; 604 participants, 10 studies; low-quality evidence) versus usual care. At six months, aerobic exercise tolerance was also improved (SMD 0.56, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.72; 591 participants; 7 studies; low-quality evidence). Authors' conclusions: Since the last version of this review, none of the new relevant studies have provided additional information to change the conclusions. We have found some improved understanding of how to encourage previously inactive cancer survivors to achieve international physical activity guidelines. Goal setting, setting of graded tasks and instruction of how to perform behaviour, feature in interventions that meet recommendations targets and report adherence of 75% or more. However, long-term follow-up data are still limited, and the majority of studies are in white women with breast cancer. There are still a considerable number of published studies with numerous and varied issues related to high risk of bias and poor reporting standards. Additionally, the meta-analyses were often graded as consisting of low- to very low-certainty evidence. A very small number of serious adverse effects were reported amongst the studies, providing reassurance exercise is safe for this population.
Article
Introduction: The aim of the study is the evaluation of the effectiveness of dance therapy in patients with mental and somatic disorders, based on a review of current research, and indication of the importance of dance therapy in the treatment of psychophysical disorders, and the presentation of scientific and historical basis of this method and also of therapeutic techniques which are used. Method: The review of literature included 13 selected clinical studies on the effects of dance and movement therapy in patients with mental disorders such as depression (4), autism spectrum disorders (1) and somatic disorders (4): obesity (2) hearing impairment (1) and dementia (1), conducted in the years 2002-2015 around the whole world. Search strategy: Medline and PsycArticles databases were searched and presented research was extracted from the titles, abstracts and full texts of the publications. The primary selection criterion was the finding of dominant mental and somatic disorders, which were treated using dance therapy. As a result, a list of the most common diseases was created, and randomly selected publications on the use of dance therapy in the treatment of patients with psychophysical disorders were presented. The study was based on titles and abstracts, and then on full texts, original papers with control groups as well as other forms of research. Results: All studies have shown the positive effect of dance therapy on patients with mental and somatic disorders, as evidenced by measurements taken during and after treatment (this is discussed in detail regarding each study). Conclusion: From the presented research results, we may conclude that dance therapy is adjuvant to traditional forms of treatment in the case of mental and somatic disorders. However, there are not enough clinical trials and reports to provide clear and reliable assessment of the effectiveness of dance therapy.
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Background: Physical activity has positive effects on cancer patients. Dancing addresses diverse bio-psycho-social aspects. Our aim was to assess the evidence on ballroom dancing and to develop the setting for a pilot project. Methods: We performed a systematic review, extracted the data and designed a pilot training based on standard curricula. We included cancer patients during or after therapy. Training duration was 90 min with one regular pause and individual pauses as needed. Results: We retrieved two systematic reviews and six controlled studies. Types of dancing varied. Only one study used ballroom dancing. Dance training might improve well-being, physical fitness, fatigue and coping during and after therapy. Yet, evidence is scarce and data to derive the effect size are lacking; 27 patients and their partners took part in the pilot training. Patients and partners needed more time to learn the steps than is planned in regular ballroom classes. Participants were very satisfied with the adaptation of the training to their physical strength and estimated the training in a sheltered group. No side effects occurred. In spite of a high rate of participants reporting fatigue, 90 min of physical activity with only a few minutes of rest were manageable for all participants. Conclusion: Ballroom dancing may offer benefits for patients with respect to quality of life. Cancer patients prefer sheltered training setting and curricula of regular ballroom classes must be adapted for cancer patients. Strict curricula might reduce motivation and adherence and exclude patients with lower or variable fitness.
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Background: Women with a diagnosis of breast cancer may experience short- and long-term disease and treatment-related adverse physiological and psychosocial outcomes. These outcomes can negatively impact prognosis, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and psychosocial and physical function. Physical activity may help to improve prognosis and may alleviate the adverse effects of adjuvant therapy. Objectives: To assess effects of physical activity interventions after adjuvant therapy for women with breast cancer. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group (CBCG) Specialised Registry, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, on 18 September 2015. We also searched OpenGrey and Healthcare Management Information Consortium databases. Selection criteria: We searched for randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing physical activity interventions versus control (e.g. usual or standard care, no physical activity, no exercise, attention control, placebo) after adjuvant therapy (i.e. after completion of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, but not hormone therapy) in women with breast cancer. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We contacted trial authors to ask for additional information when needed. We calculated an overall effect size with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each outcome and used GRADE to assess the quality of evidence for the most important outcomes. Main results: We included 63 trials that randomised 5761 women to a physical activity intervention (n = 3239) or to a control (n = 2524). The duration of interventions ranged from 4 to 24 months, with most lasting 8 or 12 weeks (37 studies). Twenty-eight studies included aerobic exercise only, 21 involved aerobic exercise and resistance training, and seven used resistance training only. Thirty studies described the comparison group as usual or standard care, no intervention, or control. One-fifth of studies reported at least 20% intervention attrition and the average physical activity adherence was approximately 77%.No data were available on effects of physical activity on breast cancer-related and all-cause mortality, or on breast cancer recurrence. Analysis of immediately postintervention follow-up values and change from baseline to end of intervention scores revealed that physical activity interventions resulted in significant small-to-moderate improvements in HRQoL (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.39, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.57, 22 studies, 1996 women; SMD 0.78, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.17, 14 studies, 1459 women, respectively; low-quality evidence), emotional function (SMD 0.21, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.32, 26 studies, 2102 women, moderate-quality evidence; SMD 0.31, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.53, 15 studies, 1579 women, respectively; low-quality evidence), perceived physical function (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.49, 25 studies, 2129 women; SMD 0.60, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.97, 13 studies, 1433 women, respectively; moderate-quality evidence), anxiety (SMD -0.57, 95% CI -0.95 to -0.19, 7 studies, 326 women; SMD -0.37, 95% CI -0.63 to -0.12, 4 studies, 235 women, respectively; low-quality evidence), and cardiorespiratory fitness (SMD 0.44, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.58, 23 studies, 1265 women, moderate-quality evidence; SMD 0.83, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.27, 9 studies, 863 women, respectively; very low-quality evidence).Investigators reported few minor adverse events.Small improvements in physical activity interventions were sustained for three months or longer postintervention in fatigue (SMD -0.43, 95% CI -0.60 to -0.26; SMD -0.47, 95% CI -0.84 to -0.11, respectively), cardiorespiratory fitness (SMD 0.36, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.69; SMD 0.42, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.79, respectively), and self-reported physical activity (SMD 0.44, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.72; SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.93, respectively) for both follow-up values and change from baseline scores.However, evidence of heterogeneity across trials was due to variation in intervention components (i.e. mode, frequency, intensity, duration of intervention and sessions) and measures used to assess outcomes. All trials reviewed were at high risk of performance bias, and most were also at high risk of detection, attrition, and selection bias. In light of the aforementioned issues, we determined that the evidence was of very low, low, or moderate quality. Authors' conclusions: No conclusions regarding breast cancer-related and all-cause mortality or breast cancer recurrence were possible. However, physical activity interventions may have small-to-moderate beneficial effects on HRQoL, and on emotional or perceived physical and social function, anxiety, cardiorespiratory fitness, and self-reported and objectively measured physical activity. The positive results reported in the current review must be interpreted cautiously owing to very low-to-moderate quality of evidence, heterogeneity of interventions and outcome measures, imprecision of some estimates, and risk of bias in many trials. Future studies with low risk of bias are required to determine the optimal combination of physical activity modes, frequencies, intensities, and durations needed to improve specific outcomes among women who have undergone adjuvant therapy.
Article
Objectives To update our previous evaluation of the exercise interventions used in randomised controlled trials of breast cancer survivors in relation to (1) the application of the principles of exercise training in the exercise prescription; (2) the reporting of the components of the exercise prescription; and (3) the reporting of adherence of participants to the prescribed interventions. Design Systematic review. Data sources The OVID Medline, Embase, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus electronic databases were searched from January 2010 to January 2017. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials of at least 4 weeks of aerobic and/or resistance exercise in women diagnosed with breast cancer, reporting on physical fitness or body composition outcomes. Results Specificity was appropriately applied by 84%, progression by 29%, overload by 38% and initial values by 67% of newly identified studies. Reversibility was reported by 3% anddiminishing returns by 22% of newly identified studies. No studies reported all components of the exercise prescription in the methods, or adherence to the prescribed intervention in the results. Reporting of reversibility has increased from 2010, but no other improvements in reporting were noted from the previous review. Summary/Conclusion No studies of exercise in women with breast cancer attended to all principles of exercise training, or reported all components of the exercise prescription in the methods, or adherence to the prescription in the results. Full reporting of the exercise prescribed and completed is essential for study replication in research and translating research findings into the community, and should be prioritised in future trials.
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Objective. —To encourage increased participation in physical activity among Americans of all ages by issuing a public health recommendation on the types and amounts of physical activity needed for health promotion and disease prevention.
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One possible reason for the continued neglect of statistical power analysis in research in the behavioral sciences is the inaccessibility of or difficulty with the standard material. A convenient, although not comprehensive, presentation of required sample sizes is provided. Effect-size indexes and conventional values for these are given for operationally defined small, medium, and large effects. The sample sizes necessary for .80 power to detect effects at these levels are tabled for 8 standard statistical tests: (1) the difference between independent means, (2) the significance of a product-moment correlation, (3) the difference between independent rs, (4) the sign test, (5) the difference between independent proportions, (6) chi-square tests for goodness of fit and contingency tables, (7) 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and (8) the significance of a multiple or multiple partial correlation.
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The purpose of this study was to determine the heart rate and oxygen consumption of middle aged men and women during the performance of Greek traditional dances. Eight males (age: 46.5 ± 4.4 yrs., VO2max: 38.3 ± 5.4 ml/kg/min, HRmax: 183.4 ± 10.3 b/min) and eight females (age: 45.1 ± 3.4 yrs., VO2max: 32.5 ± 4.7 ml/kg/min, HRmax: 181 ± 7.3 b/min), who have been dancing for the last 5 years, performed in random order 24 traditional dances from eight regions of Greece. Heart rate was measured continuously (Polar Electro, Finland) and oxygen consumption (Oxycon Champion, Μinjnhardt, Netherlands) immediately after each dance. The analysis of the data revealed great variations between the dances in oxygen consumption (from 10.6 ± 2.3 up to 26.1 ± 4.1 ml/kg/min) and heart rate (from 100.9 ± 12.1 up to 157.3 ± 14.6 b/min) with no differences observed between men and women. Based on oxygen consumption and heart rate the dances were classified as low (30-43% of VO2max and 55-63% of HRmax, n=7), moderate (46-59% of VO2max and 64-69% of HRmax, n=9) and high (61-75% of VO2max and 74-86% of HRmax, n=8) intensity dances. It appears that some Greek traditional dances, except the pleasance, the amusement and the education they offer, they also affect the oxygen transport system and could be used as another form of aerobic exercise, since their intensity is within the ranges suggested for aerobic training.
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To evaluate the effects of 10 weeks of aerobic exercise on depressive and anxiety symptoms and self-esteem of breast cancer survivors. Experimental, crossover. Midwestern university town. Twenty-four breast cancer survivors (mean time following surgery 41.8 months; ranging from 1 to 99 months) recruited via mail and cancer support groups. The mean age of the sample was 48.9 years. Subjects were assigned randomly into exercise (EX), exercise-plus-behavior modification (EX + BM), and control groups. EX and EX + BM groups exercised aerobically four days/week at > or = 60% of age-predicted maximum heart rate for 10 weeks. Data were collected pretest, post-test, and crossover (12 weeks following post-test). Because pretest or post-test scores showed no statistical differences between EX and EX + BM groups, data were combined to form one group. Aerobic exercise (four days/ week; 30-40 minutes/session), depression, (Beck Depression inventory), anxiety (Speilberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory). Pre- to post-test analyses revealed that women who exercised had significantly less depression and state and trait anxiety over time compared to controls. After the crossover, the control group demonstrated comparable improvements in both depressive and state anxiety scores. Self-esteem did not change significantly. Subjects who received exercise recommendations from their physicians exercised significantly more than subjects who received no recommendation. Mild to moderate aerobic exercise may be of therapeutic value to breast cancer survivors with respect to depressive and anxiety symptoms but not to self-esteem. A physician's recommendation to exercise appears to be an important factor in a patient's exercise adherence. To Improve depressive and anxiety symptoms following breast cancer surgery, healthcare professionals should consider recommending mild to moderate exercise.
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To describe the occurrence of fatigue in a large sample of breast cancer survivors relative to general population norms and to identify demographic, medical, and psychosocial characteristics of fatigued survivors. Breast cancer survivors in two large metropolitan areas completed standardized questionnaires as part of a survey study, including the RAND 36-item Health Survey, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Symptom Checklist, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale, and demographic and treatment-related measures. On average, the level of fatigue reported by the breast cancer survivors surveyed (N = 1,957) was comparable to that of age-matched women in the general population, although the breast cancer survivors were somewhat more fatigued than a more demographically similar reference group. Approximately one third of the breast cancer survivors assessed reported more severe fatigue, which was associated with significantly higher levels of depression, pain, and sleep disturbance. In addition, fatigued women were more bothered by menopausal symptoms and were somewhat more likely to have received chemotherapy (with or without radiation therapy) than nonfatigued women. In multivariate analyses, depression and pain emerged as the strongest predictors of fatigue. Although the majority of breast cancer survivors in this large and diverse sample did not experience heightened levels of fatigue relative to women in the general population, there was a subgroup of survivors who did report more severe and persistent fatigue. We identified characteristics of these women that may be helpful in elucidating the mechanisms underlying fatigue in this population, as well as directing intervention efforts.
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Obese women and women who gain weight after a breast cancer diagnosis are at a greater risk for breast cancer recurrence and death compared with lean women and women who do not gain weight after diagnosis. In this population-based study, we assessed weight and body fat changes from during the first year of diagnosis to during the third year after diagnosis, and whether any changes in weight and body fat varied by demographic, prognostic, and lifestyle factors in 514 women with incident Stage 0-IIIA breast cancer. Patients were participants in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) study. Weight and body fat (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans) were measured during the baseline visit and 2 years later at a follow-up visit. Analysis of covariance methods were used to obtain mean weight and body fat changes adjusted for potential cofounders. Women increased their weight and percent body fat by 1.7 +/- 4.7 kg and 2.1% +/- 3.9%, respectively, from during their first year of diagnosis to during their third year of diagnosis. A total of 68% and 74% of patients gained weight and body fat, respectively. Greater increases in weight were observed among women diagnosed with a higher disease stage, younger age, being postmenopausal, and women who decreased their physical activity from diagnosis to up to 3 years after diagnosis (P for trend < .05). Weight and body fat increased in the postdiagnosis period. Future research should focus on the effect of physical activity on weight and fat loss and breast cancer prognosis.
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To examine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, depression and anxiety in women with early breast cancer in the five years after diagnosis. Observational cohort study. NHS breast clinic, London. 222 women with early breast cancer: 170 (77%) provided complete interview data up to either five years after diagnosis or recurrence. Prevalence of clinically important depression and anxiety (structured psychiatric interview with standardised diagnostic criteria) and clinical and patient risk factors, including stressful life experiences (Bedford College life events and difficulties schedule). Nearly 50% of the women with early breast cancer had depression, anxiety, or both in the year after diagnosis, 25% in the second, third, and fourth years, and 15% in the fifth year. Point prevalence was 33% at diagnosis, falling to 15% after one year. 45% of those with recurrence experienced depression, anxiety, or both within three months of the diagnosis. Previous psychological treatment predicted depression, anxiety, or both in the period around diagnosis (one month before diagnosis to four months after diagnosis). Longer term depression and anxiety, were associated with previous psychological treatment, lack of an intimate confiding relationship, younger age, and severely stressful non-cancer life experiences. Clinical factors were not associated with depression and anxiety, at any time. Lack of intimate confiding support also predicted more protracted episodes of depression and anxiety. Increased levels of depression, anxiety, or both in the first year after a diagnosis of early breast cancer highlight the need for dedicated service provision during this time. Psychological interventions for women with breast cancer who remain disease free should take account of the broader social context in which the cancer occurs, with a focus on improving social support.
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Ellis, McDougall and Monk (Dyslexia, 2, 31–58 (1996)) reported data concerning differences of dyslexic, control, poor and precocious readers in regard to reading, spelling, visual processing and phonological processing. They reported that there were no significant differences between the dyslexic children and the other groups in reading, spelling and phonological tasks. The dyslexics were faster in visual processing and had superior comprehension compared with the control and precocious readers. Their study triggered a controversy in regard to the actual academic differences between dyslexic and other children. The purpose of the present paper is to provide an alternative explanation for the lack of significant mean differences between the children with dyslexia and the comparison groups. Responsible for the finding of no significant differences was considered lack of statistical power. An analysis of a sample of data pertaining to spelling differences indicated that for most of the student comparisons there was a very low probability of revealing significant effects (the probability ranged between 1% and 63%, much lower than acceptable levels). Moreover, what was considered more important was the magnitude of the difference between groups (effect size). The standard difference between the groups ranged between 0.12 and 0.64. For five out of the six comparisons the difference between groups was less than 0.5, which is considered to be small for offering any practically meaningful differences between groups (Cohen, Psychological Bulletin, 112, 155–159 (1992)). The issue of actual differences among dyslexic, control, poor and precocious readers needs to be reconsidered using estimates of effect size in order to identify dyslexics' possible deficits in specific academic areas. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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BACKGROUND The goals of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) are to improve axillary staging and reduce unnecessary axillary lymph node dissections (ALND), thereby reducing treatment-related upper-limb morbidity. In the current prospective study, short-term upper-limb morbidity was assessed after SLNB and/or ALND.METHODS The study comprised 204 patients with Stage I/II breast carcinoma. Mean patient age was 55.6 years (standard deviation, 11.6). Sixty-six patients (32%) underwent SLNB only, and 138 (68%) underwent a Level I–II ALND. Assessment (preoperative [t0] and 6 weeks postoperative [t1]) included evaluation of shoulder range of motion, muscle strength, grip strength, pain, upper/forearm circumference, shoulder disability, and activities of daily life (ADL).RESULTSConsiderable treatment-related upper-limb morbidity was observed. Significant (P < 0.001) changes were found for pain, range of motion in forward flexion, abduction and abduction/external rotation, strength of shoulder abductors and elbow flexors, and in perceived disability in ADL. However, no significant difference in change of upper-limb function and ADL was found between the SLNB and ALND groups.CONCLUSIONS Significant short-term treatment-related upper-limb morbidity exists after SLNB or ALND. There is no significant difference in short-term treatment-related morbidity between SLNB and ALND. Cancer 2003;98:690–6. © 2003 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.11545
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The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of Greek traditional dances on the improvement of old people's quality of life. A hundred and eleven subjects (75 women and 36 men) 60-91 years old, were divided into an experimental group (n=76) which participated in Greek traditional dances and a control group (n=35) which was discussing and watching television, both for 1h. The Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale [McAuley, E., Courneya, K., 1994. The Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale (SEES): development and preliminary validation. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 16, 163-177] was used to measure positive well-being, psychological distress, and fatigue and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [Spielberger, C.D., Gorsuch, R., Lushene, R., 1970. Manual for the State-trait Anxiety Inventory. Consulting Psychologists, Palo Alto] to measure state and trait anxiety respectively. Correlational analyses, between the various measures taken postdance, showed that the overall set of relations between the SEES subscales and the SAI-Y1 subscale supports the criterion-related validity of this measure of exercise-induced psychological responses. The independent groups t-tests showed that the control group in comparison to experimental group, at rest as well as on the second measurement, has significantly higher levels of state anxiety (t=-4.45, p<0.001 &t=-6.56, p<0.001), psychological distress (t=-4.30, p<0.001 &t=-5.46, p<0.001), and fatigue (t=-3.16, p<0.01 &t=-3.46, p<0.001), while it has significantly lower levels of positive well-being (t=4.23, p<0.001 &t=6.90, p<0.001). After dancing approximately 63% of maximum heart rate of experimental group was activated, while from paired t-tests significant decreases in state anxiety (t=5.02, p<0.001) and psychological distress (t=3.14, p<0.01) were observed, as well as significant increases in positive well-being (t=-4.44, p<0.001) and fatigue (t=-2.15, p<0.05). On the other hand, no significant difference in control group was observed. Consequently, Greek traditional dances may be used as a functional psycho-physical activity, to produce both physical and mental benefits for elderly individuals.