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ChemInform Abstract: Phytochemicals and Biological Activities of Dipsacus Species

State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, P R China.
Chemistry & Biodiversity (Impact Factor: 1.52). 03/2011; 8(3):414-30. DOI: 10.1002/cbdv.201000022
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The plants of genus Dipsacus, with a wide distribution in Europe, Asia, and Africa, have been used as medicinal agents to treat several diseases, including lime disease, fibromyalgia, bone fracture, and abortion, and especially the Alzheimer's disease and cancer. A large number of studies on plants of genus Dipsacus has revealed cytoprotective properties, inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, antinociceptive, and antimicrobial effects, etc. This review compiles all chemical constituents isolated, mainly triterpenoids, iridoids, phenolics, and alkaloids, from the genus Dipsacus over the past few decades together with their structural features, biological activities, and structure-activity relationships.

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    • "Most importantly, CS has been widely applied for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), human dental pulp cells (hDPCs), and osteoblast-like cells for the enhancement of cell adhesion , proliferation, and tissue mineralization [13] [14] [15]. Meanwhile, a suitable concentration of Si can decrease osteoclastgenesis in osteoclast cells [16] [17] [18], and enhance angiogenesis in hDPCs [19] [20]. However, the low degradation rate of CS may result in a decrease in osteoconductivity, which could cause clinical failure in the process of bone healing [7]. "
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