Article

Antenatal depression: A rationale for studying exercise

Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
Depression and Anxiety (Impact Factor: 4.41). 03/2011; 28(3):234-42. DOI: 10.1002/da.20777
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Major depressive disorder (MDD) in pregnancy or antenatal depression poses unique treatment challenges and has serious consequences for mothers, unborn babies, and families when untreated. This review presents current knowledge on exercise during pregnancy, antidepressant effects of exercise, and the rationale for the specific study of exercise for antenatal depression.
A systematic literature review was performed using English language articles published in Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from 1985 to January 2010.
There is a broad literature supporting the antidepressant effects of exercise, but a paucity of studies specifically for antenatal depression. A small number of observational studies have reported that regular physical activities improve self-esteem and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression during pregnancy. To date, there have not been randomized controlled studies of exercise for the treatment of MDD in pregnant women.
Systematic studies are needed to assess exercise as a treatment alternative for MDD during pregnancy. In consideration of the benefits of exercise for the mother and baby, and the burden of depression, studies are needed to determine the role of exercise for pregnant women with depression.

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    • "This was a self-selected group who chose to participate in the exercise programme, but there is considerable evidence that exercise can improve mood and anxiety (Shivakumar et al., 2011), and that levels of physical activity tend to decrease during pregnancy (Poudevigne & O'Connor, 2006). There have been no systematic studies of the effects of exercise on depression during pregnancy, but this is a promising area (Shivakumar, et al., 2011). The challenge, as ever, is how to help women, especially depressed women, to participate consistently in an exercise programme. "

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    • "Interestingly enough, the first scientifically based link between physical health and exercise, or lack of it, was only reported as recently as 1953 by Jerry Morris [2] [3]. Since then, exercise has been regarded as a universal remedy for psychological and physical wellbeing, from preventing chronic health conditions to promoting weight loss and better sleep as underlined by numerous scientific studies [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]. Furthermore , Vaamonde et al. have observed that physically active subjects have better semen parameters and hormone levels than sedentary subjects [10] [11]. "

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    • "Interestingly enough, the first scientifically based link between physical health and exercise, or lack of it, was only reported as recently as 1953 by Jerry Morris [2] [3]. Since then, exercise has been regarded as a universal remedy for psychological and physical wellbeing, from preventing chronic health conditions to promoting weight loss and better sleep as underlined by numerous scientific studies [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]. Furthermore , Vaamonde et al. have observed that physically active subjects have better semen parameters and hormone levels than sedentary subjects [10] [11]. "
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