Article

Lumbar Total Disc Replacement

Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, TX, USA.
Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy (Impact Factor: 3.01). 03/2011; 41(3):200. DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2011.0405
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The patient was a 27-year-old woman with an 18-month history of low back pain that was insidious in onset. She worked as a military pilot, and her pain was unresponsive to all nonsurgical measures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a L4-5 herniated nucleus pulposus, and 6 months later the patient underwent an L4-5 microdiscectomy. However, due to continued debilitating pain, she was medically removed from flight status and was pending discharge from the military. The patient underwent an L4-5 total disc replacement using the Maverick disc prosthesis. The patient began treatment with a physical therapist 1 month after total disc replacement surgery. At 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years following total disc replacement, Oswestry Disability Index scores were 0%. Additionally, the patient returned to flight status and full recreational activities. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2011;41(3):200. doi:10.2519/jospt.2011.0405.

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