Article

Impact Evaluation of a Pilot Web-Based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity

Department of Exercise, Sport, and Health Education, Radford University, Virginia 24142, USA.
American journal of health promotion: AJHP (Impact Factor: 2.37). 03/2011; 25(4):227-30. DOI: 10.4278/ajhp.081216-ARB-307
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this pilot study was to conduct an impact evaluation of a 10-week Web-based physical activity intervention.
Quasi-experimental, three-group pretest, posttest design.
Large Midwestern university.
Participants (N = 233) included college students registered for three courses. The study employed a convenience sample consisting of a Web-based group (n = 108), a physical activity group (n = 64), and a general health group (n = 61).
The Web-based group received a Social Cognitive Theory behavioral skill-building intervention and exercised 3 days per week in their leisure time. The physical activity group received exercise instruction and was required to attend three physical activity labs per week. The comparison group received health instruction.
Outcome variables included moderate and vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, social support, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations and expectancies.
Differences between groups were assessed at pretest and posttest using multiple analyses of variance.
Vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, and outcome expectancy value changed significantly in the Web-based and physical activity course groups (p < .01).
Even with consideration of limitations such as small sample size and lack of randomization, the Web-based and traditional physical activity lecture and activity lab interventions were superior in eliciting changes in vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, and outcome expectancy value than a traditional health course.

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    • "0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 − 17. Grim et al. 2011 [5] "
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective . Evaluate the literature on interventions targeting tertiary education staff within colleges and universities for improvements in health behaviors such as physical activity, dietary intake, and weight loss. Data Source . One online database, Medline, was searched for literature published between January 1970 and February 2013. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria . All quantitative study designs, including but not limited to randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, nonrandomized experimental trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies, were eligible. Data Extraction . Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers. Extraction was checked for accuracy and consistency by a second reviewer. Data Synthesis . Data in relation to the above objective were extracted and described in a narrative synthesis. Results . Seventeen studies were identified that focused on staff within the tertiary education setting. The review yielded overall positive results with 13 reporting significant health-related improvements. Weight loss, physical activity and fitness, and/or nutrition were the focus in more than half (n = 9) of the studies. Conclusion . This appears to be the first review to examine health interventions for tertiary education staff. There is scope to enhance cross-disciplinary collaboration in the development and implementation of a "Healthy University" settings-based approach to health promotion in tertiary education workplaces. Universities or colleges could serve as a research platform to evaluate such intervention strategies.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
    • "0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 − 17. Grim et al. 2011 [5] "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective. Evaluate the literature on interventions targeting tertiary education staff within colleges and universities for improvements in health behaviors such as physical activity, dietary intake, and weight loss. Data Source. One online database, Medline, was searched for literature published between January 1970 and February 2013. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria. All quantitative study designs, including but not limited to randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, nonrandomized experimental trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies, were eligible. Data Extraction. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers. Extraction was checked for accuracy and consistency by a second reviewer. Data Synthesis. Data in relation to the above objective were extracted and described in a narrative synthesis. Results. Seventeen studies were identified that focused on staff within the tertiary education setting. The review yielded overall positive results with 13 reporting significant health-related improvements. Weight loss, physical activity and fitness, and/or nutrition were the focus in more than half (n = 9) of the studies. Conclusion. This appears to be the first review to examine health interventions for tertiary education staff. There is scope to enhance cross-disciplinary collaboration in the development and implementation of a “Healthy University” settings–based approach to health promotion in tertiary education workplaces. Universities or colleges could serve as a research platform to evaluate such intervention strategies.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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