Isolation and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in foods of animal origin in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Article · March 2011with45 Reads
DOI: 10.1016/j.jiph.2010.10.002 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Listeriosis is a disease of humans and animals, in which it is one of the important emerging bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Among the different species of the genus Listeria, Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is known to cause listeriosis in humans and animals with low incidence but high case fatality rate. Information on the occurrence and distribution of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria species is very limited both in the veterinary and public health sectors in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize L. monocytogenes and other Listeria species from foods of animal origin (cottage cheese, raw beef, raw milk and liquid whole egg) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A total of 391 food samples of animal origin were collected randomly, using a cross-sectional study design from November 2008 to March 2009. L. monocytogenes isolation and characterization were performed according to mainly the United States Food and Drug Administration procedures. Of the samples examined, 102 (26.1%) were found to be positive for Listeria. Listeria species were isolated in 39 (51.3%), 37 (32.2%), 22 (22%) and 4 (4%) of the raw beef, liquid whole egg, raw milk and cottage cheese samples respectively. L. monocytogenes was detected in 5.4% of the samples analyzed. It was isolated mainly from raw milk (13%) and liquid whole egg (4.3%) followed by raw beef (2.6%) and cottage cheese (1%). In addition to L. monocytogenes, other Listeria species were identified as L. innocua (60.8%), L. welshimeri (6.9%), L. seeligeri (3.9%), L. murrayi (2.9%) and L. grayi (2.9%) and L. ivanovii (1.9%). It was shown that L. monocytogenes and other Listeria species are widely spread in occurrence in foods of animal origin in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.