Article

New directions in simulation-based surgical education and training: Validation and transfer of surgical skills, use of nonsurgeons as faculty, use of simulation to screen and select surgery residents, and long-term follow-up of learners

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.
Surgery (Impact Factor: 3.38). 02/2011; 149(6):735-44. DOI: 10.1016/j.surg.2010.11.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The Consortium of American College of Surgeons-Accredited Education Institutes was created to explore new opportunities in simulation-based surgical education and training beyond the scope of individual accredited institutes. During the Third Annual Meeting of the Consortium of American College of Surgeons-Accredited Education Institutes Consortium, 4 work groups addressed the validation and transfer of surgical skills, the use of nonsurgeons as faculty, the use of simulation to screen and select surgery residents, and long-term follow-up of learners. The key elements from the deliberations and conclusions are summarized in this manuscript.

0 Followers
 · 
69 Reads
  • Source
    • "Considering that surgical training on living patients (traditional learning) violates ethical and medical-legal aspects, that training on live animals and fresh human cadaver increases the risk of infections, involves high costs and limited access, requires specialized installations, and also contravenes ethical legal aspects, and that using virtual reality simulators involves high costs and restricted access [7] [8], the simulation-based basic surgical teaching on inanimate bench models is becoming widely used [9]. However, to date, it has not been established a teaching program that allows surgical skills to be completely acquired [4] [5], and new opportunities in simulation-based surgical education need to be explored to positively impact quality and safety in surgical care [10]. Among all the surgical specialties, plastic surgery now occupies a negligible component of many undergraduate curricula, and there is much discussion in the worldwide literature regarding if there is a place for plastic surgery in the undergraduate curriculum [11] [12] [13] [14]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Due to ethical and medical-legal drawbacks, high costs, and difficulties of accessibility that are inherent to the practice of basic surgical skills on living patients, fresh human cadaver, and live animals, the search for alternative forms of training is needed. In this study, the teaching and learning process of basic surgical skills pertinent to plastic surgery during medical education on different inanimate bench models as a form of alternative and complementary training to the teaching programs already established is proposed.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Methods of learning may differ between generations and even the level of training or the training paradigm, or both. To optimize education, it is important to optimize training designs, and the perspective of those being trained can aid in this quest. The Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery leadership sent a survey to all vascular surgical trainees (integrated [0/5], independent current and new graduates [5 + 2]) addressing various aspects of the educational experience. Of 412 surveys sent, 163 (∼40%) responded: 46 integrated, 96 fellows, and 21 graduates. The survey was completed by 52% of the integrated residents, 59% of the independent residents, and 20% of the graduates. When choosing a program for training, the integrated residents are most concerned with program atmosphere and the independent residents with total clinical volume. Concerns after training were thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm procedures and business aspects: 40% to 50% integrated, and 60% fellows/graduates. Integrated trainees found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (79%), with 9% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory and venous training were judged "just right" by 87% and ∼71%, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 82% felt it prevented fatigue, and 24% thought it was detrimental to patient care. Independent program trainees also found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (71%), with 12% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory/venous training were "just right" by 87% and 60% to 70%, respectively, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (∼65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 62% felt it was detrimental to patient care, and 42% felt it prevented fatigue. A supportive environment and adequate clinical volume will attract trainees to a program. For "an urgent need to know," the integrated trainees are especially turning to online texts rather than traditional textbooks, which suggests an opportunity for a shift in educational focus. Point-of-care is the best time for education and feedback, suggesting a continued need for dedicated faculty. The business side of training is underserved and should be addressed.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2011 · Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Current problems in surgery
Show more