Article

Self-, parent-, and teacher-reported behavioral symptoms in youngsters with Tourette syndrome: A case-control study

Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy.
European journal of paediatric neurology: EJPN: official journal of the European Paediatric Neurology Society (Impact Factor: 2.3). 03/2011; 15(2):95-100. DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2011.01.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple tics and associated with co-morbid behavioral problems (TS-plus). We investigated the usefulness of self-report versus parent- and teacher-report instruments in assisting the specialist assessment of TS-plus in a child/adolescent population.
Twenty-three patients diagnosed with TS (19 males; age 13.9 ± 3.7 years) and 69 matched healthy controls participated in this study. All recruited participants completed a standardized psychometric battery, including the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Self Administrated Psychiatric Scales for Children and Adolescents (SAFA) and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised (CPRS-R). Participants' teachers completed the Conners' Teacher Rating Scales-Revised (CTRS-R). Results were compared with similar data obtained from controls.
Nineteen patients (82.6%) fulfilled DSM-IV-TR criteria for at least one co-morbid condition: obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, n = 8; 34.8%); attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, n = 6; 26.1%); OCD + ADHD (n = 5; 21.7%). Scores on self-report instruments failed to show any significant differences between TS and controls. Most subscores of the CPRS-R, CTRS-R, and CBCL were significantly higher for the TS group than controls. The TS + OCD subgroup scored significantly higher than the TS-OCD subgroup on the CBCL-Externalizing, Anxious/Depressed and Obsessive-Compulsive subscales.
Self-report instruments appear to have limited usefulness in assisting the assessment of the behavioral spectrum of young patients with TS. However, proxy-rated instruments differentiate TS populations from healthy subjects, and the CBCL can add relevant information to the clinical diagnosis of co-morbid OCD.

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    • " generally indicate that anger in TS is closely associated with more complex presentations often characterized by OCD , ADHD , and / or impulsivity ( Budman et al . , 2000 ; Budman , Rockmore , Stokes , & Sossin , 2003 ; Cavanna , Cavanna , & Monaco , 2008 ; Chen et al . , 2013 ; Frank , Piedad , Rickards , & Cavanna , 2011 ; Kano et al . , 2008 ; Termine et al . , 2011 ; Wright , Rickards , & Cavanna , 2012 ) ."
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    ABSTRACT: Young patients with Tourette Syndrome (TS) can exhibit poor emotional control and aggression. We explored anger in young patients with TS. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with TS and 41 healthy controls completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Parents and teachers completed the Child Behavior Checklist, and Conners' Parent/Teacher Rating Scales-Revised. STAXI scores were not significantly different between patients with TS and controls. However, many proxy-rated measures linked to anger and externalizing problems were significantly higher in TS. As proxy-rated instruments revealed more oppositional and aggressive behaviors in young patients with TS, they are important in the multidimensional assessment of TS. These findings offer useful insights into the nature of anger symptoms in young patients with TS and provide a basis for more effective diagnosis and management.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Children s Health Care
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    • "Young patients with GTS often report functional impairments , defined as the inability to perform routine and age-appropriate tasks in the domains of school, home, and social activities [13] [14]. It has been suggested that a comprehensive assessment of GTS-related difficulties in young patients with GTS should take into account both self-and proxy-reports, which can differ substantially [15]. A study of 138 youths aged 5 to 18 years showed that 46% of children with GTS demonstrate school-related problems. "
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    ABSTRACT: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterised by multiple motor and phonic tics and associated behavioural problems, carrying a significant burden on patients' lives. Although the term health related-quality of life (HR-QOL) has only been used in recent years, several studies have long addressed the impact of GTS on physical, psychological and social aspects of wellbeing of both children and adults with GTS. We set out to answer the question "Is HR-QOL affected by GTS and, if so, in what domains?" by conducting a systematic literature review of published original studies addressing HR-QOL in both children and adult patients with GTS. This review focuses on the current evidence on the impact of GTS on patients' lives, mainly informed by studies using generic functional impairment and HR-QOL measures from the last decade, and expands on the new opportunities introduced by the recently developed GTS-specific HR-QOL scales (GTS-QOL and GTS-QOL-C&A). Analysis of the first decade of studies specifically addressing HR-QOL in GTS suggests that co-morbid conditions are key factors in determining HR-QOL in young patients, whilst the picture is more complex in adults with GTS. These findings offer some general directions for both current clinical practice and future research.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · Behavioural neurology
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    ABSTRACT: AimsTourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple tics and associated with co-morbid behavioral problems (TS-plus). We investigated the usefulness of self-report versus parent- and teacher-report instruments in assisting the specialist assessment of TS-plus in a child/adolescent population.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · European journal of paediatric neurology: EJPN: official journal of the European Paediatric Neurology Society
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