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Desisting and persisting gender dysphoria after childhood: A qualitative follow-up study

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The aim of this qualitative study was to obtain a better understanding of the developmental trajectories of persistence and desistence of childhood gender dysphoria and the psychosexual outcome of gender dysphoric children. Twenty five adolescents (M age 15.88, range 14-18), diagnosed with a Gender Identity Disorder (DSM-IV or DSM-IV-TR) in childhood, participated in this study. Data were collected by means of biographical interviews. Adolescents with persisting gender dysphoria (persisters) and those in whom the gender dysphoria remitted (desisters) indicated that they considered the period between 10 and 13 years of age to be crucial. They reported that in this period they became increasingly aware of the persistence or desistence of their childhood gender dysphoria. Both persisters and desisters stated that the changes in their social environment, the anticipated and actual feminization or masculinization of their bodies, and the first experiences of falling in love and sexual attraction had influenced their gender related interests and behaviour, feelings of gender discomfort and gender identification. Although, both persisters and desisters reported a desire to be the other gender during childhood years, the underlying motives of their desire seemed to be different.
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... Ages 10-13 are considered a key time for consolidation of gender identity. 34 After this, only 1.9% to 3.5% of youth receiving gender-affirming medications at specialized gender clinics discontinue treatment. 35 Furthermore, studies have found that adults who stop treatment often do so for reasons related to social discrimination and not a change in identity and that, for those reporting a change in identity, some do not express regret for their earlier transition. ...
... For instance, in an influential research study, Thomas Steensma and colleagues (2011) conducted a longitudinal study of 25 adolescents with GID in Children (now, Gender Dysphoria). Their semi-structured interview focused on four main areas: gender identity, gender role behavior/preferences, stability in gender variance, and physical development (Steensma et al., 2011(Steensma et al., , 2013. Among notable differences between the two groups of adolescents, persisters (those who continued to experience and assert transgender feelings into adolescence) indicated that they were their experienced gender whereas desisters (those who came to identify with their gender assigned at birth by adolescence) reported merely wishing they were their previously experienced gender. ...
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... For instance, in an influential research study, Thomas Steensma and colleagues (2011) conducted a longitudinal study of 25 adolescents with GID in Children (now, Gender Dysphoria). Their semi-structured interview focused on four main areas: gender identity, gender role behavior/preferences, stability in gender variance, and physical development (Steensma et al., 2011(Steensma et al., , 2013. Among notable differences between the two groups of adolescents, persisters (those who continued to experience and assert transgender feelings into adolescence) indicated that they were their experienced gender whereas desisters (those who came to identify with their gender assigned at birth by adolescence) reported merely wishing they were their previously experienced gender. ...
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... For instance, in an influential research study, Thomas Steensma and colleagues (2011) conducted a longitudinal study of 25 adolescents with GID in Children (now, Gender Dysphoria). Their semi-structured interview focused on four main areas: gender identity, gender role behavior/preferences, stability in gender variance, and physical development (Steensma et al., 2011(Steensma et al., , 2013. Among notable differences between the two groups of adolescents, persisters (those who continued to experience and assert transgender feelings into adolescence) indicated that they were their experienced gender whereas desisters (those who came to identify with their gender assigned at birth by adolescence) reported merely wishing they were their previously experienced gender. ...
... For instance, in an influential research study, Thomas Steensma and colleagues (2011) conducted a longitudinal study of 25 adolescents with GID in Children (now, Gender Dysphoria). Their semi-structured interview focused on four main areas: gender identity, gender role behavior/preferences, stability in gender variance, and physical development (Steensma et al., 2011(Steensma et al., , 2013. Among notable differences between the two groups of adolescents, persisters (those who continued to experience and assert transgender feelings into adolescence) indicated that they were their experienced gender whereas desisters (those who came to identify with their gender assigned at birth by adolescence) reported merely wishing they were their previously experienced gender. ...
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Pereira, H. (2022). Relacionamentos em pessoas LGBTQIA+. In S. Neves & M. Correia, Investigação e prática: Abordagens interdisciplinares sobre a saúde e o bem-estar das pessoas LGBTI+ (pp. 14-42). Associação Plano I.
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Due to his high public profile, Harry Benjamin was often the first contact for those who identified as transsexual in the 1960s and 1970s, until his retirement in 1976. Among the over 800 letters from transsexuals written to Benjamin, 21 were from youth seeking his medical assistance. These letters, written from 1963–1976, provide a rare window into the lives and subjectivities of transsexual youth before the modern transgender movement took shape. Often taking the form of short autobiographies, these pioneers wrote about the meaning of their genders and sexualities, sometimes in great detail. Narrative analyses of these letters focused on narrative explanations for their transsexual desire; how Benjamin, his colleagues, and transsexual correspondents co-constructed transsexual narratives; and the rejection of these youth by their families and peers.
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CHOICE MAGAZINE Outstanding Academic Title for 2007 The field of "transgender" and "transpositionality" has been carved out as a new field of inquiry in the past decade, showing the fragmentation and diversification of masculinities and feminities - along with the error of any sharp polarisation. Dave King and Richard Ekins are the leading world sociologists in this field and have mined it richly since the 1970's. The book brings together a brilliant synthesis of history, case studies, ideas and positions as they have emerged over the past thirty years, and brings together a rich but always grounded account of this field, providing a state of the art of critical concepts and ideas to take this field further during the twenty first century. This is a must read for all interested in this new area of inquiry ' - Ken Plummer, Professor of Sociology, University of Essex. Editor of Sexualities. Author of Intimate Citizenship An outstanding survey of the evolution of trans phenomena, splendidly written, highly informative, scholarly at its best, yet easy to read even for those neither trans nor sociologist. Drs Ekins and King, experts in the field, unroll the panoramas of sex, gender, and transgendering that have evloved during the last decades. For everyone wanting to understand the interaction of women and men and of those who cannot or will not identify with either of these two cataegories, reading this book is a must, and a real pleasure' - Professor Friedmann Pfaefflin, University of ULM In a work destined to be a classic, Ekins and King offer a comprehensive overview of the diversity of contemporary transgender expression, along with an impressive conceptual framework for making sense of that diversity. The abundant case vignettes bring the authors' concepts to life and make the book a pleasure to read' - Dr Anne Lawrence, Clinical Sexologist in Private Practice, Seattle An outstanding survey of the evolution of trans phenomena, splendidly written, highly informative, scholarly at its best, yet easy to read even for those neither trans nor sociologist. Drs Ekins and King, experts in the field, unroll the panoramas of sex, gender, and transgendering that have evloved during the last decades. For everyone wanting to understand the interaction of women and men and of those who cannot or will not identify with either of these two cataegories, reading this book is a must, and a real pleasure' - This groundbreaking study sets out a framework for exploring transgender diversity for the new millennium. It sets forth an original and comprehensive research and provides a wealth of vivid illustrative material.Based on two decades of fieldwork, life history work, qualitative analysis, archival work and contact with several thousand cross-dressers and sex-changers around the world, the authors distinguish a number of contemporary transgendering stories' to illustrate:" the binary male/female divide;" the interrelations betwen sex, sexuality and gender;" the interrelations between the main sub-processes of transgendering. Wonderfully insightful, The Transgender Phenomenon develops an original and innovative conceptual framkework for understanding the full range of the transgender experience.
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