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Work environments for employee creativity

Authors:
  • Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam

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Innovative organisations need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process innovation. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the effect of personal, social-organisational and physical factors on employee creativity. Based on this framework, an instrument to analyse the extent to which the work environment enhances creativity is developed. This instrument was applied to a sample of 409 employees and support was found for the hypothesis that a creative work environment enhances creative performance. This paper illustrates how the instrument can be used in companies to select and implement improvements. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The ergonomics discipline addresses the work environment mainly for improving health and safety and sometimes productivity and quality. This paper opens a new area for ergonomics: designing work environments for enhancing employee creativity in order to strengthen an organisation's capability for product and process innovation and, consequently, its competitiveness.
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... For this reason, it is speculated: H4: Individual considerations have a positive effect on employee creativity. Dul & Ceylan (2011) distinguish between the social work environment and the physical work environment. The social work environment refers to the employee's social and organizational context regarding job design, teamwork, reward system, and leadership styles (Pawirosumarto, Sarjana, & Gunawan, 2017). ...
... However, many scholars suggest that the physical work environment may also enhance creativity. Physical environments engineered to be cognitively and perceptually stimulating can enhance creativity (Dul & Ceylan, 2011). Motalebi & Parvaneh (2021) mention the physical environment as a contextual influence and suggest that future research should address how the physical work environment moderates creative performance. ...
... Based on the results, it seems that the physical work environment has no bearing on the connection between transformational leaders and employee creativity. As Dul & Ceylan (2011) point out, there are two main types of work environments: the social and the physical. By imparting their values and treating each team member individually, leaders can encourage their teams to think creatively. ...
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Objective: In today's competitive business environment, a start-up must attract and retain employees with a high level of creativity. The effects of intrinsic motivation, dimensions of transformational leadership, and personal factors on employee creativity are investigated—the physical space of the workplace as a moderator between the transformative leadership and inventiveness dimensions. Design/Methods/Approach: This study employs a quantitative strategy using the Partial Least Squares (PLS) method for data analysis with the assistance of SmartPLS. Based on the findings, we know that 101 employees of Indonesian start-ups with a shorter history of employment than a year participated in this study. Findings: Inspiring motivation, idealized influence, intellectual stimulation, and personal consideration were all found to increase employees' inventiveness. However, results did not improve when the physical work environment was moderated between the four dependent variables: inspirational motivation, idealized influence, intellectual stimulation, and individual consideration of employees' creativity. Originality: A leader's idealized influence and intellectual stimulation on their employees is the dimension of transformational leadership used in this study. Practical/Policy implication: This study's significance is that it contributes new knowledge to the literature on the factors that affect employee creativity in Indonesia. Moreover, they can provide valuable input for company management to boost employee creativity by inspiring further development.
... Ergonomics, Žunjić et al (2015) mention, highly contribute to the quality of education through three streams including preserving students' health, creating a comfortable working environment, and adjusting instruction according to students' abilities. Dul and Ceylan (2011) clarify that the field of ergonomics deals primarily with the working environment, improving health and safety, and sometimes productivity and quality. Designing a work environment that enhances creativity and the ability to innovate in products and processes. ...
... Even the room's color and furniture can be a source of leader creativity. This workspace is included in a creative work environment that can foster the creativity of subordinates and can be referred to as a physical characteristic of the organization (Dul & Ceylan, 2010). It is natural in today's modern times when the principal plays the role of a creative leader through direct communication using symbolic workspace arrangement as a reflection of directing the realization of his creative vision in leading MTs creatively. ...
... การสร้ างนวั ตกรรม (Dul & Ceylan, 2011;Moultrie, Nilsson, Dissel, Haner, Janssen & Van der Lugt, 2007 (Davis, 1984;Van der Vaurlt, 2004;Becker, 2007;Becker & Sims, 2001;Stryker, 2004 ...
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การวิจัยนี้มีเป้าหมายค้นหาลักษณะทางกายภาพที่เอื้อให้คนทำงานสามารถใช้ความคิดสร้างสรรค์และสร้างนวัตกรรมได้ จากการวิเคราะห์ลักษณะทางกายภาพที่มีการใช้ความคิดสร้างสรรค์อย่างเข้มข้นของกรณีศึกษา 8 แห่งและติดตามสังเกตพฤติกรรมการทำงานและการใช้พื้นที่คนทำงานสร้างสรรค์ จำนวน 15 คน ตลอดระยะเวลาทำงานทั้งวันรวมทั้งสิ้น 58 วัน พบว่า สำนักงานทั้งหมดมีพื้นที่ทำงานแบบเปิดโล่ง (open plan) นักออกแบบมีพฤติกรรมการนั่งทำงานแบบใช้สมาธิมากที่สุด รองลงมาคือ การร่วมกันทำงานหรือการคุยงาน 2-3 คน ทั้งสองพฤติกรรมส่วนใหญ่เกิดขึ้นในพื้นที่นั่งทำงาน สำนักงานออกแบบสามารถจำแนกได้เป็น 3 กลุ่ม ตามลักษณะพฤติกรรมการทำงานของนักออกแบบคือ สำนักงานที่ให้ความสำคัญกับการนั่งทำงานแบบมีสมาธิ สำนักงานที่ให้ความสำคัญกับการปรึกษาพูดคุยระหว่างคนทำงาน และสำนักงานที่ให้ความสำคัญกับการพักเบรคและผ่อนคลาย การสร้างสภาพแวดล้อมภายภาพที่สนับสนุนกระบวนการทำงานเชิงสร้างสรรค์และการสร้างนวัตกรรมที่สำคัญคือ การวางแผนการออกแบบพื้นที่นั่งทำงานที่เอื้อต่อการเกิดสมาธิในการทำงาน (concentrate) และการร่วมมือกันทำงาน (collaborate)
... It is a unique type of renewable human resource and skill. It entails bringing thoughts, fantasies, and ambitions to life, combining tradition and innovation [320] . ...
Chapter
In today’s corporate environment, organizations are paying increasing attention to the spatial configuration of workspaces where creative processes and innovation are supposed to take place. These environments are designed to foster and sustain creative performance at work, providing digital, physical, and hybrid solutions to fulfill individuals’ needs and to enable modes of working alone as well as in teams. Starting with a literature review of previous research on this multidisciplinary topic addressing team dynamics, workspace design, and their relations to creativity, this chapter provides useful guidelines for the processes of creation and usage of physical, digital, and hybrid environments to foster and manage creativity in work-related settings. Firms’ strategic intents and users’ needs, sensorial experiences, and modes of interaction during the development of the creative process are aspects that are thoroughly explored and explained.KeywordsWorkspace designCreativity management
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