Functional Dilator Capacity is Independently Associated with Insulin Sensitivity and Age in Central Obesity and is not Improved by High Dose Statin Treatment

ArticleinMicrocirculation (New York, N.Y.: 1994) 18(1):74-84 · January 2011with1 Read
Impact Factor: 2.57 · DOI: 10.1111/j.1549-8719.2010.00070.x · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    To test the hypothesis that: (i) functional microvascular dilator capacity is independently associated with insulin sensitivity and age in individuals with central adiposity at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD); and (ii) functional microvascular dilator capacity is improved by high dose statin treatment.
    Functional dilator capacity (measured as change in laser Doppler blood flux from baseline during post occlusive reactive hyperemia [peak flux%resting flux; PF%RF] and flowmotion (power spectral density [PSD] analysis)) were assessed in 40 people with central adiposity and one or more other CVD risk factors. Measurements were made at rest and during acute hyperinsulinaemia before and six months after high dose atorvastatin (40 mg daily) or placebo.
    Insulin-induced change in PF%RF was independently associated with insulin sensitivity (M/I) (r = 0.46 p = 0.02) and age (r = -0.46 p = 0.02), which together explained almost half of the variance in PF%RF (adjusted r² = 0.37, p = 0.008). Whilst atorvastatin decreased LDL cholesterol by 51% (p < 0.001), PF%RF and flowmotion remained unchanged.
    Insulin sensitivity and age are independently associated with an insulin-induced change in functional microvascular dilator capacity in individuals with central adiposity at risk of CVD. Dilator capacity is not improved by six months high dose statin treatment.