Article

WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools

Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney, Australia.
Quality and Safety in Health Care (Impact Factor: 2.16). 12/2010; 19(6):542-6. DOI: 10.1136/qshc.2009.036970
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background The urgent need for patient safety education for healthcare students has been recognised by many accreditation bodies, but to date there has been sporadic attention to undergraduate/graduate medical programmes. Medical students themselves have identified quality and safety of care as an important area of instruction; as future doctors and healthcare leaders, they must be prepared to practise safe healthcare. Medical education has yet to fully embrace patient safety concepts and principles into existing medical curricula. Universities are continuing to produce graduate doctors lacking in the patient safety knowledge, skills and behaviours thought necessary to deliver safe care. A significant challenge is that patient safety is still a relatively new concept and area of study; thus, many medical educators are unfamiliar with the literature and unsure how to integrate patient safety learning into existing curriculum.
Design To address this gap and provide a foothold for medical schools all around the world, the WHO's World Alliance for Patient Safety sponsored the development of a patient safety curriculum guide for medical students. The WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools adopts a ‘one-stop-shop’ approach in that it includes a teacher's manual providing a step-by-step guide for teachers new to patient safety learning as well as a comprehensive curriculum on the main patient safety areas. This paper establishes the need for patient safety education of medical students, describes the development of the WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools and outlines the content of the Guide.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Felix Greaves
  • Source
    • "The WHO guide acknowledges that patient safety should be integrated , but recognises that most curricula are 'already filled beyond capacity' (Walton et al., 2010, p.545). While short term evaluation of the guide is reported as taking place, long term research into patient safety labelled curricula would be valuable in exploring impacts and consequences such as those predicted by participants in this study. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2014
  • Source
    • "topic 2: What is human factors engineering, and why is it important to patient safety?, and (b) topic 3: Understanding systems and the impact of complexity on patient care (Walton et al., 2010). The US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) promotes an HFE approach to the design of health information technology (IT) (NRC Committee on the Role of Human Factors in Home Health Care, 2010, 2011) and has published a variety of guidance documents on using HFE systems models to analyze patient safety events in healthcare delivery (Henriksen et al., 2008, 2009). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Applied ergonomics
  • Source
    • "The WHO guide acknowledges that patient safety should be integrated , but recognises that most curricula are 'already filled beyond capacity' (Walton et al., 2010, p.545). While short term evaluation of the guide is reported as taking place, long term research into patient safety labelled curricula would be valuable in exploring impacts and consequences such as those predicted by participants in this study. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Education is crucial to how nurses practice, talk and write about keeping patients safe. The aim of this multisite study was to explore the formal and informal ways the pre-registration medical, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy students learn about patient safety. This paper focuses on findings from nursing. A multi-method design underpinned by the concept of knowledge contexts and illuminative evaluation was employed. Scoping of nursing curricula from four UK university programmes was followed by in-depth case studies of two programmes. Scoping involved analysing curriculum documents and interviews with 8 programme leaders. Case-study data collection included focus groups (24 students, 12 qualified nurses, 6 service users); practice placement observation (4 episodes=19hrs) and interviews (4 Health Service managers). Within academic contexts patient safety was not visible as a curricular theme: programme leaders struggled to define it and some felt labelling to be problematic. Litigation and the risk of losing authorisation to practise were drivers to update safety in the programmes. Students reported being taught idealised skills in university with an emphasis on 'what not to do'. In organisational contexts patient safety was conceptualised as a complicated problem, addressed via strategies, systems and procedures. A tension emerged between creating a 'no blame' culture and performance management. Few formal mechanisms appeared to exist for students to learn about organisational systems and procedures. In practice, students learnt by observing staff who acted as variable role models; challenging practice was problematic, since they needed to 'fit in' and mentors were viewed as deciding whether they passed or failed their placements. The study highlights tensions both between and across contexts, which link to formal and informal patient safety education and impact negatively on students' feelings of emotional safety in their learning.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Nurse education today
Show more